Benefits

  • April 26, 2024

    Mich. To Pay $55M In Suit Over COVID-19 Aid Clawbacks

    Michigan's unemployment insurance agency will pay $55 million to people whose benefits were improperly clawed back without notice during the pandemic and reform its collection practices to ensure due process under a settlement that has received initial approval from a state judge.

  • April 26, 2024

    ERISA Suits Targeting Annuity Deals Could Escalate

    A quartet of lawsuits targeting employers who terminate their pension plans and exchange them for annuity insurance contracts could trigger a new wave of class action litigation if they gain traction, since hundreds of thousands of retirees have been subject to pension risk transfers in recent years, attorneys say.

  • April 26, 2024

    Health Co. Not Liable For Cigna Underpayment, 3rd Circ. Says

    The Third Circuit on Friday backed a win for a healthcare cost management company in a suit over Cigna's alleged underpayment for plastic surgery, finding the contract between the company and a plastic surgery practice did not guarantee a set payment rate.

  • April 26, 2024

    Investors Ask 3rd Circ. To Revive Row With Maiden Holdings

    Investors urged the Third Circuit to revive their suit claiming that reinsurance company Maiden Holdings Ltd. misrepresented its underwriting and risk management practices, saying the lower court's erroneous discovery restriction prevented them from proving their case.

  • April 26, 2024

    Ex-Conn. Hospital Worker Says He Was Assaulted, Then Fired

    Stamford Health Inc. terminated a hospital maintenance worker soon after he suffered a violent assault in the workplace, claiming that he abandoned his job even though it failed to provide him with necessary paperwork to take medical leave, according to an amended lawsuit filed Friday in Connecticut federal court.

  • April 26, 2024

    Gov't Wants Ex-Boston Celtic Imprisoned For Health Plan Scheme

    Prosecutors asked a Manhattan federal judge to sentence former Boston Celtics player Glen "Big Baby" Davis to roughly three years in prison after he was convicted of scheming with a group of ex-pros to submit fraudulent invoices to the NBA's healthcare plan.

  • April 26, 2024

    Ex-BP Commodities Trader Says Co. Reneged On Bonus

    A former BP commodities trader accused the company in Texas federal court of shorting him to the tune of $6 million when it abruptly fired him in January 2022 and paid him a smaller bonus than the $11 million he expected to receive.

  • April 25, 2024

    Tesla Says Investors May Want To Influence Shareholder Vote

    Tesla on Thursday questioned the motives of investors who want billions of dollars in company stock put into a trust, saying that their push to hasten the court's decision in their suit over Elon Musk's compensation plan raises concerns that they want to "elicit commentary" ahead of a shareholder meeting.

  • April 25, 2024

    Zendesk Beats Shareholders' Suit Over $10B PE Takeover

    Zendesk Inc. has defeated a securities class action in California federal court accusing the customer service software company of undervaluing itself to get a $10.2 billion go-private merger with private equity firms approved by Zendesk shareholders.

  • April 25, 2024

    Feds Say COVID Fraud Case Against Ex-Pol Clears Early Bar

    Federal prosecutors said Thursday that a former Massachusetts politician should save for trial his arguments seeking to dismiss claims that he lied to rake in COVID-19 relief funds and tried to avoid reporting income to the Internal Revenue Service. 

  • April 25, 2024

    Manufacturer To Pay $3M To End Retirement Kickback Suit

    An aerospace and auto parts manufacturer will pay nearly $3 million to settle a suit claiming it pushed workers' retirement savings into lackluster funds through an investing tool that prioritized kickbacks for the plan's recordkeeper over returns for employees, according to a filing Thursday in Michigan federal court.

  • April 25, 2024

    Judge Decries Discovery Delay In Chicago Genetic-Bias Fight

    An Illinois federal judge has warned a proposed class of Chicago employees that further discovery delays in their suit alleging a city wellness program intentionally discriminated against them on the basis of their genetic information could result in the court barring witnesses' testimony from the case.

  • April 25, 2024

    Paint Cos. Owe Fringe Benefits, Union Fund Trustees Say

    The trustees of an International Union of Painters and Allied Trades benefits fund accused a Michigan painting company of violating a collective bargaining agreement by not making contributions and subcontracting work to a related entity in an attempt to evade its obligations.

  • April 25, 2024

    4 Takeaways From DOL's Final ERISA Investment Advice Regs

    The U.S. Department of Labor’s finalized regulations broadening who qualifies as a fiduciary under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act will bring more investment advisers under the purview of federal benefits law, but the final version contains some important differences from what the DOL initially proposed. Here are four key takeaways.

  • April 25, 2024

    Mich. Justices Reject Park Ranger's Disability Benefits Appeal

    Two Michigan Supreme Court justices on Thursday agreed with the rest of the bench not to rule on a park ranger's claims that state retirement law unconstitutionally prevents him from challenging his disability benefit denial, but called out a lower court's "circular" reasoning for finding him ineligible.

  • April 25, 2024

    WWE Shareholders Combine Chancery TKO Merger Suits

    Delaware's Court of Chancery will decide this summer whether teams led by Block & Leviton, Bernstein Litowitz or Robbins Geller will represent World Wrestling Entertainment Inc. stockholders in a consolidated class suit against founder Vincent McMahon and others over the company's $21 billion merger with the Endeavor Group.

  • April 25, 2024

    Class Counsel Seeks $31M From $93M Lipitor Settlement

    Attorneys representing a class of buyers in antitrust litigation against Pfizer over the cholesterol medication Lipitor have asked a New Jersey federal judge to approve their request for $31 million in fees after the two sides agreed to a $93 million settlement in February.

  • April 25, 2024

    Airplane Fuel Co. Seeks To Ax Union Healthcare Dispute

    A company that fuels airplanes at major U.S. airports asked a New York federal judge to dismiss a $157,000 suit accusing it of underfunding a Teamsters healthcare plan, saying the plan trustees filed the suit too late and can't prove the company owes the money.

  • April 24, 2024

    Chancery Lets $344M Carlyle Tax-Payout Suit Move Ahead

    A vice chancellor of the Delaware Court of Chancery on Wednesday refused to toss most claims in a stockholder suit led by a Pittsburgh pension fund targeting a $344 million tax-asset buyout at The Carlyle Group Inc., though she did trim the suit by a single count.

  • April 24, 2024

    Metals Firm To Pay $66M Over Retirement Coin Scam

    A California federal judge has ordered a metals trading firm to pay $66 million and each of its owners to pay between $1 million and $3 million to settle claims that they defrauded hundreds of investors by convincing them to sell their retirement securities to buy gold and silver coins at inflated prices.

  • April 24, 2024

    Investors Can't Hit Reset In 737 Max Fraud Suit, Boeing Says

    Investors claiming Boeing wiped out billions in stock value by misrepresenting the 737 Max's safety shouldn't be allowed to "effectively hit the reset button" and pursue an amended complaint that relies on statements already deemed inactionable, the aerospace giant argued Wednesday.

  • April 24, 2024

    Solar Co. Must Pay Workers, Union Benefit Funds

    A Kalamazoo, Michigan-based solar company must follow an arbitration board's order to remit unpaid wages to two workers and unpaid contributions to a group of union benefit funds, a Michigan federal judge ruled Wednesday.

  • April 24, 2024

    3rd Circ. Won't Let Keystone Coal Escape Black Lung Payout

    The Third Circuit on Wednesday denied Keystone Coal Mining Corp.'s request to revoke benefits awarded to a miner with pneumoconiosis under the Black Lung Benefits Act, rejecting its argument that the administrative law judge hearing the case did not properly consider all the evidence.

  • April 24, 2024

    Boston Pension Doubles Down On Bid To Lead NYCB Suit

    Boston's municipal pension plan and its attorneys from Labaton Keller Sucharow LLP stood firm on their bid to lead a proposed securities class action against New York Community Bancorp, saying their chief rival for lead status bought their shares too late and is too sketchy to be a potential plaintiff.

  • April 24, 2024

    Anthem Faces Class Action Over Cancer Treatment Denials

    Anthem Health Plans Inc. has been hit with a proposed class action in Connecticut alleging that it routinely denies requests for proton beam radiation therapy, a cancer treatment that the complaint asserts is recognized as "established, medically appropriate, safe and effective" but which the insurer deems experimental.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

    Author Photo

    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • The SEC's Cooled Down But Still Spicy Private Fund Rules

    Author Photo

    Timothy Spangler and Lindsay Trapp at Dechert consider recently finalized U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rules, which significantly alter the scope of obligations private fund advisers must meet under the Investment Advisers Act, noting the absence of several contentious proposals and litigation that could result in implementation delays.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

    Author Photo

    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • Pa. City Ch. 9 Ruling Raises Municipal Financing Concerns

    Author Photo

    A Pennsylvania district court’s recent ruling in a Chapter 9 case filed by the city of Chester, Pennsylvania, strengthens the foundations of the municipal bond market, but also demonstrates that bankruptcy courts continue to struggle with some of the features of municipal revenue bonds and issue rulings that contradict market expectations, say attorneys at Cadwalader.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

    Author Photo

    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

    Author Photo

    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

  • Understanding Discovery Obligations In Era Of Generative AI

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    Attorneys and businesses must adapt to the unique discovery challenges presented by generative artificial intelligence, such as chatbot content and prompts, while upholding the principles of fairness, transparency and compliance with legal obligations in federal civil litigation, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • How Mental Health Ruling Paves Road For Equal Coverage

    Author Photo

    The Tenth Circuit’s recent ruling in E.W. v. Health Net, which clarified the pleading requirements necessary to establish a Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act violation, is a win for plaintiffs as it opens the door to those who have been denied coverage for behavioral health treatment to prove a mental health parity violation, says Mark DeBofsky at DeBofsky Law.

  • An Informed Guide To Mastering Retirement Plan Forfeitures

    Author Photo

    When considering how to allocate departing retirement plan participants’ forfeitures, sponsors should consider recently filed lawsuits that allege Employee Retirement Income Security Act violations for using such funds to offset employer contributions, as well as proposed IRS guidance concerning how and when they must be used, says Eric Gregory at Dickinson Wright.

  • The Case For Post-Bar Clerk Training Programs At Law Firms

    Author Photo

    In today's competitive legal hiring market, an intentionally designed training program for law school graduates awaiting bar admission can be an effective way of creating a pipeline of qualified candidates, says Brent Daub at Gilson Daub.

  • Attorneys Have An Ethical Duty To Protect The Judiciary

    Author Photo

    The tenor of public disagreement and debate has become increasingly hostile against judges, and though the legislative branch is trying to ameliorate this safety gap, lawyers have a moral imperative and professional requirement to stand with judges in defusing attacks against them and their rulings, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • 5 New Calif. Laws Employers Need To Know

    Author Photo

    Now is a good time for employers to evaluate personnel rules to keep pace with California’s newly adopted employee protections, which go into effect early next year and include laws regarding reproductive loss leave, cannabis use, workplace violence prevention and noncompete agreements, say attorneys at Farella Braun.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Benefits archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!