Benefits

  • April 02, 2024

    Public Gets More Time To Comment On Secure 2.0 Disclosure

    Government agencies tasked with reviewing the reporting and disclosure requirements for employee retirement plans said Tuesday that they'll be extending the deadline for comments on how these processes could be improved, a goal established under retirement plan incentive package Secure 2.0.

  • April 02, 2024

    Ex-Trustees Urge Ga. High Court To Take On Legal Fee Spat

    Former trustees of a furniture tycoon's trust have asked the Georgia Supreme Court to rule that the trust has a duty to defend them against claims from the trust beneficiaries, arguing that this "appeal has implications for every indemnitee/insured" in the state.

  • April 02, 2024

    Unum Beats Ex-Hogan Lovells Atty's Disability Fight

    A Maryland magistrate judge has handed Unum Life Insurance Co. of America a win in an Employee Retirement Income Security Act lawsuit brought by a former Hogan Lovells attorney who claimed she was wrongly denied long-term disability benefits for her fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue and abdominal and joint pain.

  • April 02, 2024

    Emirates Can't Sink COVID-19 Severance Suit

    A New York federal judge refused to toss a proposed class action alleging the airline Emirates withheld severance from American workers after they were furloughed and then let go during the COVID-19 pandemic, ruling the employees showed they may have been owed extra money.

  • April 02, 2024

    DOL Narrows Retirement Asset Manager Exemption

    The U.S. Department of Labor unveiled a final regulation Tuesday making it tougher for investment managers with serious misconduct on their records to handle Employee Retirement Income Security Act-covered retirement plans, broadening an ineligibility clause that previously only covered criminal convictions.

  • April 01, 2024

    Inotiv Can't Toss Investor Suit Over Feds' 'Puppy Mill' Probe

    Medical research services provider Inotiv Inc. must face a proposed investor class action accusing it of failing to disclose that subsidiaries it acquired had come under investigations by the U.S. Department of Justice for animal welfare and smuggling violations, an Indiana federal judge ruled while lamenting the "appalling" mistreatment of beagles that investigators had found.

  • April 01, 2024

    Milliman Lost 401(k) Funds On Unproven Strategy, Judge Told

    Milliman's risky investments cost its employees' retirement plan more than $50 million and were part of a failed "experiment" to benefit its own bottom line, a class of employees told a Washington federal judge on Monday, kicking off a bench trial seeking to recover their losses.

  • April 01, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Last week, Delaware's Court of Chancery saw a $42.5 million settlement, dismissal of two big suits with two more remanded back, and new cases from shareholders of Walt Disney, Donald Trump's Truth Social, Rivian Automotive and BarkBox.

  • April 01, 2024

    AIG Unit Can't Toss Conn. Utility's $3M Defense Cost Bid

    An AIG unit can't escape the Connecticut Municipal Electric Energy Cooperative's third-party suit seeking to recoup $3 million in legal expenses, a Connecticut federal court ruled, saying the cooperative has standing to pursue coverage on behalf of its former CEO who was convicted of stealing public funds.

  • April 01, 2024

    Bankrupt Coal Co.'s Affiliates Beat $6.5B Union Pension Suit

    A bankrupt coal company's affiliates have dodged claims that they owe $6.5 billion to a union pension plan, with a Washington, D.C., federal judge holding that the plan's trustees lacked standing to sue under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act because one trustee wasn't properly appointed.

  • April 01, 2024

    MassMutual Escapes Ex-Worker's 401(k) Mismanagement Suit

    A Massachusetts federal judge tossed a former MassMutual worker's suit claiming the life insurance and investment company mismanaged its workers' $4.1 billion retirement plan, ruling that her claims were either time-barred or lacked adequate details.

  • April 01, 2024

    Cigna Can't Escape Patients' ERISA Fight Over Claim Rates

    A Connecticut federal judge agreed to trim a federal benefits lawsuit against Cigna alleging the company underpaid claims from providers who indirectly contracted with the insurer, finding allegations from participants in employer-sponsored health plans could proceed to discovery but that several medical associations lacked standing to sue.

  • April 01, 2024

    Aramark Accuses Aetna Of 'Gamesmanship' In Benefits Fight

    Aramark said Aetna sued it over an arbitration pact in Connecticut as a tactical response to Aramark's Texas suit claiming the insurer cost it millions by approving shoddy health benefit claims, and urged a federal judge to ship Aetna's suit to Texas as well.

  • April 01, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Wary Of Defense Co.'s Late $19.4M Pension Claim

    The Federal Circuit appeared skeptical Monday of an aviation defense company's attempt to revive pension claims against the federal government, as judges on the panel questioned the implications of reviving a claim outside the six-year statute of limitations.

  • March 29, 2024

    Petition Watch: Off-Label Ads, Retiree Discrimination & PPE

    A Utah attorney has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to determine whether allegedly retaliatory IRS summonses can be quashed, and two former pharmaceutical executives are challenging the constitutionality of their convictions for marketing the off-label use of a drug. Here, Law360 looks at recently filed petitions that you might've missed.

  • March 29, 2024

    Hogan Lovells Vet's High Court Debut A Study In Contrasts

    Several weeks ago, when a Hogan Lovells lawyer finally delivered U.S. Supreme Court arguments after 20 years at the firm, she parsed arcane arbitration issues and her words weren't widely heard outside the courtroom. But weeks later and back at the high court podium, her words were heard nationwide when she pointedly spotlighted a judge's use of "anonymous blog posts" in a bombshell abortion ruling.

  • March 29, 2024

    BP Hid Negative Effects Of Pension Changes, Judge Says

    A Texas federal judge sided with a class of over 7,000 BP retirees who alleged that the oil giant meddled with their pension plans and underpaid their retirement benefits, finding that BP touted the changes to the plan as positive while unlawfully hiding more detrimental information.

  • March 29, 2024

    Home Depot Asks High Court To Block $2.67B BCBS Deal

    Home Depot has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to take up its challenge of a $2.67 billion settlement in antitrust litigation targeting Blue Cross Blue Shield, saying the deal immunizes activity that hurts competition.

  • March 29, 2024

    Retirement Advisers Back Biden Admin's ESG Rule In 5th Circ.

    Supporters of a Biden administration rule allowing retirement advisers to consider environmental, social and governance issues when making decisions for clients rose to defend the policy in the Fifth Circuit, arguing the move aligns with fiduciary duties to minimize risks and maximize returns for clients.

  • March 29, 2024

    Sweeping Class Certified In Nationwide Pension Plan Suit

    More than 50,000 participants in a Nationwide pension plan can proceed as a class with claims that the company unlawfully transferred assets from the plan to a company subsidiary, as an Ohio federal judge ruled that questions about Nationwide's conduct outweigh differences among participants.

  • March 29, 2024

    5 Appellate Arguments Benefits Attys Should Watch In April

    A defense contractor will square off with the government over pension obligations, workers at an auto parts retailer and Georgetown University staffers will look to revive suits claiming their retirement savings were mismanaged, and a ban on gender-affirming care for minors will get an en banc review. Here are five argument sessions that should be on benefits attorneys' radar in April.

  • March 29, 2024

    Weekly Internal Revenue Bulletin

    The Internal Revenue Service issued its weekly bulletin Friday, which included proposed regulations for claiming a tax credit for the production of qualified clean hydrogen.

  • March 28, 2024

    Fruit Grower Cleared To Leave Ch. 11 With $43M Exit Loan

    California stone fruit producer Prima Wawona is set to wind down its packing and distribution division, hand ownership of the reorganized company to creditors and leave bankruptcy after a Delaware bankruptcy judge agreed to approve its Chapter 11 plan Thursday.

  • March 28, 2024

    9th Circ. Won't Let Cigna Patients Appeal Class Cert. Denial

    The Ninth Circuit won't let a group of Cigna plan participants immediately appeal a trial court's rejection of class status in their lawsuit accusing the insurance giant of unlawfully colluding with its billing contractor to underpay out-of-network claims for mental health treatments.

  • March 28, 2024

    Radiology Co. To Pay $19M To End ESOP Self-Dealing Suit

    A radiology company and its employee stock ownership plan trustee will pay $19 million to settle a proposed class action alleging that executives used shell companies to suck value out of the company and shorted workers when the business was sold for $215 million.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    CFPB Must Clarify When Anti-Fraud Benefits Offset Harms

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    The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's ill-explained orders against two banks, concerning legitimate unemployment accounts that were frozen in attempts to control COVID-era fraud, illustrate an urgent need for bureau guidance on when the systemwide benefits of a potentially unfair practice outweigh the risk of harming a minority of consumers, says Jonathan Joshua at Joshua Law Firm.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • How To Win More Money For Terminated Executives

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Terminated executives are often rattled into accepting too little money and too many restrictive covenants, but by converting the company’s hidden anxieties into leverage and using proven bargaining-table talking points to reframe the employer’s risks, outgoing executives can negotiate significantly better severance packages, says Stephen Zweig at FordHarrison.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Arbitration Is Still On The Table To Fight ERISA Class Actions

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    Despite the U.S. Supreme Court recently denying certiorari in two cases that would have brought clarity to the arbitrability of ERISA claims, it is likely that the issue will remain hotly contested for some time, but lower court decisions provide tools for plan sponsors to curtail their ERISA exposure, say attorneys at Sullivan & Cromwell.

  • Exploring Menopause Benefits: A Guide For Employers

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    With 64% of women surveyed in 2023 wanting employer-sponsored menopause benefits, companies that wish to recruit and retain female employees should consider updating both their healthcare plans and corporate culture to help these often-marginalized workers feel and perform their best, say Diane Dygert and Maria Rossi at Seyfarth.

  • ERISA Litigation Faces New Frontiers In 2024

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    As plaintiffs firms explore novel theories for recovery and the Department of Labor attempts to broaden the definition of an investment advice fiduciary, 2024 could see new types of Employee Retirement Income Security Act litigation after just 100 class actions were filed last year, say attorneys at Groom Law.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

  • Federal Courts And AI Standing Orders: Safety Or Overkill?

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    Several district court judges have issued standing orders regulating the use of artificial intelligence in their courts, but courts should consider following ordinary notice and comment procedures before implementing sweeping mandates that could be unnecessarily burdensome and counterproductive, say attorneys at Curtis.

  • 7 E-Discovery Predictions For 2024 And Beyond

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    The legal and technical issues of e-discovery now affect virtually every lawsuit, and in the year to come, practitioners can expect practices and policies to evolve in a number of ways, from the expanded use of relevancy redactions to mandated information security provisions in protective orders, say attorneys at Littler.

  • Securities Class Actions Show No Signs of Slowing In 2024

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    Plaintiffs asserted securities class actions at elevated levels in 2023 — a sign that filings will remain high in the year ahead — as they switched gears to target companies that allegedly have failed to anticipate supply chain disruptions, persistent inflation, rising interest rates and other macroeconomic headwinds, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • Justice O'Connor Was Architect of ERISA's Lasting Success

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    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor laid the foundations of Employee Retirement Income Security Act jurisprudence, defining a default standard of review, preemption rules and the act's interplay with employment law, through opinions that are still instructive as ERISA approaches its 50th anniversary, says José Jara at Fox Rothschild.

  • 5 Litigation Funding Trends To Note In 2024

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    Over the next year and beyond, litigation funding will continue to evolve in ways that affect attorneys and the larger litigation landscape, from the growth of a secondary market for funded claims, to rising interest rates restricting the availability of capital, says Jeffery Lula at GLS Capital.

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