Class Action

  • April 05, 2024

    Where Will 10 Private IPhone Suits Call Home, Calif. or NJ?

    Two different groups of consumers are pushing competing visions for where they want to pursue claims that Apple tried to lock in iPhone users, with one case first filed in California seeking transfer to New Jersey while a second group sought consolidation of all private lawsuits in the Golden State.

  • April 05, 2024

    Neb. Beef Seller Says No Proof It Joined Wage-Fixing Scheme

    A Colorado federal judge gave a Nebraska beef wholesaler another chance to petition for dismissal from a class action accusing it of participating in a meat industry wage-fixing scheme, after the company filed a motion that didn't follow the court's page limit.

  • April 05, 2024

    Tesla Workers Skipped Breaks To Meet Quotas, Suit Says

    Two former warehouse workers hit Tesla with a proposed wage and hour class action Thursday in California federal court, alleging the electric carmaker violated labor laws by not providing sufficient break time, operating an illegal quota system and failing to pay all of their wages.

  • April 05, 2024

    Feds Say Bombing Survivors' Suit Is Outside Court's Authority

    The Biden administration is again pushing to escape survivors' efforts to hold it accountable for U.S. allies' airstrikes in Yemen, telling a Washington, D.C., federal court it had no authority over the executive branch's foreign arms dealing.

  • April 05, 2024

    Home Depot Accused Of Using Fake Discounts Online

    Home Depot has been hit with a class action in Georgia federal court, alleging it tricks buyers into purchasing items online by advertising false original prices and corresponding discounts that create the "illusion of short-lived bargains."

  • April 05, 2024

    Publix Wants Ga. High Court Input On Opioid Public Nuisance

    Grocery chain Publix has asked the Ohio federal court overseeing the opioid multidistrict litigation to send questions to Georgia's high court about whether that state's law allows public nuisance claims over a healthcare provider's dispensing of prescription narcotics.

  • April 05, 2024

    Insurers Fight Kidde-Fenwal's Bid For Coverage Of Foam Suits

    Two AIG units and another insurer have told a Delaware bankruptcy court it should reject fire-suppression company Kidde-Fenwal Inc.'s bid to secure their coverage for a bevy of underlying suits alleging the company exposed those plaintiffs to so-called forever chemicals via its production of firefighting foam.

  • April 05, 2024

    Nationwide Optometry To Pay $3.4M Over 2021 Data Breach

    Nationwide Optometry will pay $3.4 million to a proposed class of approximately 714,000 patients whose personal information was compromised following a ransomware attack in 2021 on network servers belonging to co-defendant U.S. Vision, according to a preliminary approval motion filed in New Jersey federal court.

  • April 05, 2024

    Solar Company Hit With TCPA Suit After $13.8M FTC Fine

    Months after the Federal Trade Commission slapped lead generation firm Solar Xchange with a $13.8 million fine for sending out millions of pestering calls to people on the National Do-Not-Call Registry, one recipient of those calls has filed suit in Massachusetts federal court to seek his own recompense.

  • April 05, 2024

    UBS Beats Blockchain Co.'s Spoofing Suit, For Now

    UBS Securities LLC has, for now, escaped a suit accusing it of a so-called spoofing campaign against blockchain company Phunware's stock, with a New York federal judge saying that while Phunware has adequately alleged the spoofing scheme took place, it has failed to show how it was impacted or injured by it. 

  • April 05, 2024

    SXSW Insurer Asks 5th Circ. To Rethink Coverage Ruling

    The insurer of Texas music festival South by Southwest has asked a Fifth Circuit panel to rehear its case seeking to avoid covering a class action by ticket holders who didn't get refunds when the event was canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020.

  • April 05, 2024

    Food Co. Shells Out $1.5M To End 401(k) Mismanagement Suit

    A California food manufacturer will pay $1.5 million to end a proposed class action alleging it loaded a $323 million employee 401(k) plan with excessive fees and costly, underperforming investment options, according to settlement details unveiled in federal court Friday.

  • April 05, 2024

    School District Seeks To Knock Out Teachers' Equal Pay Suit

    A school district asked a Pennsylvania federal judge Friday to toss or at least decertify a collective action alleging it paid male teachers more than women who had similar experience, arguing that the workers couldn't show they had enough in common to justify a group action.

  • April 05, 2024

    Green Energy Co. Duped Investors Out Of $40M, Suit Says

    A proposed class of investors has hit a purported Chicago green energy outfit and its executives with a federal suit claiming they used promises of extravagant returns to get the plaintiffs to invest but never created any energy or produced the returns they promised. 

  • April 05, 2024

    2nd Circ. Revives Coinbase Securities Class Action

    The Second Circuit on Friday revived a proposed class action accusing crypto trading platform Coinbase of selling unregistered securities, saying that competing user contracts left it open for interpretation as to who, exactly, was the direct seller of dozens of tokens trading on the exchange.

  • April 05, 2024

    IBM Retirees Filed Shorted Pension Suit Too Late, Judge Says

    IBM escaped a proposed class action alleging it stiffed workers on pension payments by using outdated mortality data to calculate their benefits when a New York federal judge ruled that their claims timed out under the plan's limitations on when its participants could sue.

  • April 04, 2024

    Google Ad Privacy Class Loses Cert. Bid, For Now

    A California federal judge Thursday refused to certify a class of potentially tens of millions of Google account holders alleging the company's ad auction practices violate privacy rights, saying that while the consumers have hit many certification requirements, the current class definition is improperly fail-safe.

  • April 04, 2024

    'No Madonna Fan' Expects Show At Ticket Time, Singer Says

    Madonna, Live Nation and the Barclays Center asked a New York federal judge to toss a lawsuit alleging fans were "lulled" into buying tickets for a show that started two hours late, saying no reasonable concertgoer — "and certainly no Madonna fan" — expects the headliner to begin at the ticketed time.

  • April 04, 2024

    Tribes And McKinsey Take Final Step In $39.5M Opioid Deal

    A California judge signed off Thursday on the completion of a $39.5 million nationwide settlement deal that resolves all opioids litigation brought by federally recognized tribes against McKinsey & Co.

  • April 04, 2024

    MoneyLion's Woes Draw Del. Suit Against SPAC Insiders

    Investors have sued the sponsor of a blank-check company and several of its directors and controllers in Delaware's Chancery Court, accusing them of overvaluing a merger with digital finance platform MoneyLion, which was sued by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in 2022.

  • April 04, 2024

    DraftKings Beats Bettors' Suit Tied To Damar Hamlin Collapse

    DraftKings on Thursday defeated a proposed class action when a federal judge found that the online sports betting platform followed its own rules after a Monday Night Football game was halted and ultimately canceled due to the collapse of Buffalo Bills safety Damar Hamlin.

  • April 04, 2024

    Crypto Bank, Chair Blast FTX Investors' 'Gatling Gun' Claims

    A crypto bank and its chairman have urged a Florida federal judge to toss a second amended complaint from FTX investors alleging they helped Sam Bankman-Fried abscond with $8 billion in customer assets, saying the investors "employ a Gatling gun approach to pleading."

  • April 04, 2024

    Athletes Say NCAA's Own Actions Prove NIL Rules No Good

    Athletes suing the NCAA over restrictions on the use of their names, images and likenesses are seeking summary judgment, arguing the practice dampens competition with no legitimate justification and that the organization's own actions have shown that to be true.

  • April 04, 2024

    Morgan Stanley, Goldman Sachs Can't Duck Archegos Claims

    A New York appellate court on Thursday affirmed a decision refusing to dismiss ViacomCBS investors' claims against Morgan Stanley, Goldman Sachs and a long list of banks over the collapse of Archegos Capital Management, finding that investors plausibly identified statements the banks made that could have been misleading.

  • April 04, 2024

    Oracle Gets Wiretap Claim Cut From Data Collection Fight

    A California federal judge on Wednesday trimmed a proposed class action alleging Oracle illegally sold internet users' "electronic profiles," finding that new allegations that executive Larry Ellison admitted Oracle's new technology was "scaring the lawyers" aren't enough to show tortious intent to plead a viable Electronic Communications Privacy Act claim.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    New Rule 702 Helps Judges Keep Bad Science Out Of Court

    Author Photo

    A court's recent decision to exclude dubious testimony from the plaintiffs' experts in multidistrict litigation over acetaminophen highlights the responsibility that judges have to keep questionable scientific evidence out of courtrooms, particularly under recent amendments to Federal Rule of Evidence 702, says Sherman Joyce at the American Tort Reform Association.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

    Author Photo

    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Opinion

    Proposed Rule Could Impair MDL Flexibility, Harm Plaintiffs

    Author Photo

    While proposed Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 16.1 is intended to enhance the management of multidistrict litigation proceedings, its one-size-fits-all requirements could stifle the flexibility that judges need to address the varying circumstances of MDLs effectively, and jeopardize plaintiffs' ability to pursue justice, say Christopher Seeger and Jennifer Scullion at Seeger Weiss.

  • Del.'s Tesla Pay Takedown Tells Boards What Not To Do

    Author Photo

    The Delaware Chancery Court’s ruthless dissection of the Tesla board’s extreme departures from standard corporate governance in its January opinion striking down CEO Elon Musk’s $55 billion pay package offers a blow-by-blow guide to mistakes Delaware public companies can avoid when negotiating executive compensation, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • What Brands Must Know For Calif. Recycle Label Compliance

    Author Photo

    A brand that stamps nonrecyclable packaging with the chasing arrows symbol could face liability under California's new law on labeling recyclable material, so brand owners should keep an eye on the state's pending survey process to identify which materials meet the criteria before requirements go into effect, say attorneys at ArentFox Schiff.

  • Opinion

    3rd-Party Financiers Have Power To Drive Mass Tort Cases

    Author Photo

    The abnormal recovery premium presented by modern mass tort cases coupled with their deemphasized role for attorneys creates an opportunity for third-party financiers to both create and control these cases, says Samir Parikh at Lewis & Clark Law School.

  • Del. Dispatch: Clarification On Fiduciary Duties Of Controllers

    Author Photo

    The Delaware Chancery Court’s January opinion in a Sears Hometown and Outlet Stores' stockholder dispute — holding that a controlling stockholder owes the company and minority shareholders some fiduciary duties when selling shares or voting to change the status quo — suggests instances where investors opposing board decisions should tread carefully, say attorneys at Fried Frank.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

    Author Photo

    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • What Retailers Should Note In Calif. Web Tracking Suits

    Author Photo

    As retailers face a deluge of class actions alleging the use of conventional web analytic tools violate wiretapping and eavesdropping provisions of the California Invasion of Privacy Act, uncovering the path toward a narrow interpretation of the law will largely depend on how these cases proceed, say Matthew Pearson and Kareem Salem at BakerHostetler.

  • Musk Pay Package Ruling Offers Detailed Lesson On Del. Law

    Author Photo

    Anat Alon-Beck and John Livingstone at Case Western Reserve University discuss the specifics that led Delaware's chancellor to rescind Elon Musk's $55.8 billion Tesla pay package on Jan. 30, how the state’s entire fairness doctrine played into the ruling, and its bigger-picture impact on the executive compensation landscape.

  • Chancery's Sears Ruling Clarifies Stockholder Duties

    Author Photo

    In a recent landmark decision involving stockholders of Sears Hometown and Outlet Stores, the Delaware Chancery Court addressed for the first time what precise duties a controlling stockholder owes, highlighting that controller interference with board action is not per se invalid and that enhanced scrutiny is a reasonableness test, say Christopher Chuff and Taylor Bartholomew at Troutman Pepper.

  • Del. Ruling Adds Momentum For Caremark Plaintiffs

    Author Photo

    The Delaware Supreme Court's recent opinion in Lebanon County Employees' Retirement Fund v. Collis could be viewed as expanding plaintiffs' ability to viably plead a Caremark claim against directors, so Delaware companies should be on heightened alert and focus on creating a record of board oversight, say attorneys at V&E.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

    Author Photo

    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • Best Practices For Untangling Mass Tort Claimants' Liens

    Author Photo

    Recent litigation over faulty earplugs produced by 3M is just one example of a mass tort where settlement payouts to claimants will likely be complicated by the number of liens and lienholders involved — but claimants' attorneys can speed up the lien resolution process by keeping a few key strategies in mind, says Mark Eveland at Verus.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Class Action archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!