Commercial Litigation UK

  • April 09, 2024

    Climate Inaction Violates Human Rights Law, ECHR Rules

    The European Court of Human Rights found on Tuesday that the Swiss government was at fault over failures to tackle global warming, one of three major decisions on climate change that could affect litigation in the future.

  • April 09, 2024

    Worker Sacked For Posting Facebook Meme Wins £15K

    A tribunal has awarded an employee of a lighting manufacturer almost £15,000 ($19,000) after concluding that her boss unfairly sacked her for re-posting a work-related meme on Facebook.

  • April 09, 2024

    Insurance Director Denies Inducing Employees' Defection

    The director of an insurance startup incubator has denied allegations that he induced a managing general underwriter's employees to violate their duties when they left to found a new business, saying he believed the establishment of the new company was lawful.

  • April 09, 2024

    Newcastle United Accused Of Harming Fans With Kit Deal

    Lawyers representing Sports Direct asked the U.K.'s antitrust court on Tuesday to grant an injunction to force Newcastle United to stock its stores with the soccer club's replica kits after a rival retailer was given an exclusive supply deal.

  • April 09, 2024

    Gaming Co. Fires Back In 'Burning Hot' TM Clash With Rival

    A casino gaming business has hit back at a challenge to the validity of its "Mini Burning Hot" trademark, arguing that its rival is trying to relitigate earlier proceedings and alleging that the competitor's U.K. trademark protections are invalid.

  • April 08, 2024

    Ex-Autonomy Exec Says Boss's Invoice Ask Caused Concern

    A former Autonomy finance employee took the stand Monday in the criminal fraud trial of ex-CEO Michael Lynch and finance director Stephen Chamberlain, telling a California federal jury that he was "not comfortable" with one of Chamberlain's invoice requests and was sacked after raising concerns about accounting irregularities.

  • April 08, 2024

    Canada's High Court Enforces Award In Greek Defense Suit

    The Supreme Court of Canada has affirmed the enforcement of an arbitral award in a dispute over a contract between aircraft manufacturer Bombardier Inc. and Greece's Ministry of National Defence, saying a Canadian bank had to refuse payment to the beneficiary of a letter of credit because of fraud.

  • April 08, 2024

    Council CEO Unlawfully Warned Against Strike, Tribunal Rules

    A local council boss violated worker protection laws when he sent a "highly unusual" email to staff, an employment tribunal has ruled, concluding it was intended to convince them not to vote in favor of an impending strike.

  • April 08, 2024

    BT Unfairly Sacked Disabled Worker, Tribunal Rules

    A British Telecommunications PLC worker who was forced to medically retire due to her disability was unfairly dismissed through an "unreasonable" procedure, a tribunal ruled.

  • April 08, 2024

    Barrister Suspended For Failing To Pay £64K Court Order

    A barrister has been banned from practicing for six months after a tribunal concluded he damaged trust in himself or the legal profession by failing to comply with a court order to pay £64,000 ($80,875).

  • April 08, 2024

    UK Eyes Reforms To Ease Corporate Apologies To Victims

    The government opened a new consultation on Monday into potential reforms that would make it easier for companies to apologize to alleged victims of wrongdoing, including in cases where organizations might be vicariously liable for the actions of an employee or a member.

  • April 08, 2024

    Lloyd's Syndicates Fight Not To Cover US Nightclub Bias Suits

    Two insurance underwriting syndicates hit back at a London claim from an international hospitality group that wants to be indemnified for two putative class actions alleging sex discrimination against men and nonbinary people at a California nightclub.

  • April 08, 2024

    Solicitor Accused Of Falsifying Costs Faces Tribunal

    A solicitor was brought before a disciplinary tribunal on Monday to face allegations that he made untruthful statements in costs schedules submitted to the High Court and undermined confidence in the legal profession.

  • April 08, 2024

    Minister Calls For Prison Time Over Post Office IT Scandal

    Individuals in the Post Office who wrongfully prosecuted innocent sub-postmasters "should go to jail," a minister said on Monday, on the eve of the inquiry into the miscarriage of justice resuming.

  • April 08, 2024

    Attwells Denies Breaking Promise In £1.2M Loan Dispute

    Attwells Solicitors LLP has denied promising that it was acting on behalf of a man who, the law firm says, was probably fraudulently posing as the owner of two properties in a move to borrow £775,000 ($980,000) from a finance company.

  • April 08, 2024

    Quran Teacher Wins Sex, Race Bias Case Against Mosque

    A female Quran teacher has won her race and sex discrimination case against a London mosque, with a tribunal ruling in a judgment published Monday that leaders viewed her as "expendable" because she was a Somali woman and unfairly fired her when pupil numbers dwindled.

  • April 08, 2024

    Saturday Work Is Not Sex Discrimination, Tribunal Rules

    London Underground did not discriminate against an employee by refusing to give her Saturdays off to look after her child — but the transport operator botched the process for assessing her request for flexible working, a tribunal has ruled.

  • April 05, 2024

    Miner Faces Mounting Financial Woes After Failed Arbitration

    Nearly a month after losing its $4.4 billion arbitration against Romania over a blocked gold and silver mining project, Canadian mining company Gabriel Resources said Thursday that it's facing a major cash crunch as it continues to weigh its options to try to revive its claims.

  • April 05, 2024

    CMS Breached Instructions Over Lawyer Fees, Ex-Client Says

    A former CMS Cameron McKenna Nabarro Olswang LLP client told a London court Friday that the law firm acted in breach of instructions when using some of the money earmarked for counsel in civil and criminal proceedings to pay itself.

  • April 05, 2024

    Korean Trade Promoter Wins Claim Despite Kickback Bid

    A South Korean trade agency unfairly dismissed a London-based employee of over 20 years — but won't have to pay him a dime after he tried to negotiate a secret commission, an employment tribunal has ruled.

  • April 05, 2024

    High Court Limits Use Of Confidential Info In $3.7B Asset Fight

    Relatives of a dead Russian oligarch and an investment company accused of international fraud on Friday partially succeeded in obtaining an order to prevent the alleged misuse of their confidential information.

  • April 05, 2024

    Exec Wins £61K After Being Forced To Quit Following Merger

    A bedding company must pay its former managing director £61,000 ($77,000) after it forced him to quit following a merger by backtracking on his benefits under the deal, and blocking him from entering the premises, a tribunal has ruled.

  • April 05, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen the BBC sued by former Georgian defense minister David Kezerashvili, Russian businessman Ildar Sharipov file a defamation claim against the publisher of the Liverpool Echo newspaper, MEX Group Worldwide sue Barclays and NatWest, and a climbing gear company hit retailer Next with a claim of copyright infringement. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • April 05, 2024

    6 Questions For Paul Hastings' Stuart Alford KC

    Paul Hastings LLP's new partner, Stuart Alford KC, is a former senior official at the Serious Fraud Office and has worked at two heavyweight U.S. firms, Kirkland & Ellis and Latham & Watkins. Here, he talks to Law360 about his career and about white-collar crime.

  • April 05, 2024

    Cloud Biz Denies Owing Telecom Execs Over Bad Sale

    A cloud technology business has denied owing directors of a telecommunications company £1.5 million ($1.9 million) left unpaid after it bought their business, claiming the money due is offset by the £2 million it lost from the sale.

Expert Analysis

  • Prompt Engineering Skills Are Changing The Legal Profession

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    With a focus on higher-value work as repetitive tasks are delegated to artificial intelligence, legal roles are set to become more inspiring, and lawyers need not fear the rising demand for prompt engineers that is altering the technology-enabled legal environment, say Eric Crawley, Shah Karim and Paul O’Hagan at Epiq Legal.

  • Opinion

    UK Whistleblowers Flock To The US For Good Reason

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    The U.K. Serious Fraud Office director recently brought renewed attention to the differences between the U.K. and U.S. whistleblower regimes — differences that may make reporting to U.S. agencies a better and safer option for U.K. whistleblowers, and show why U.K. whistleblower laws need to be improved, say Benjamin Calitri and Kate Reeves at Kohn Kohn.

  • 4 Legal Privilege Lessons From Dechert Disclosure Ruling

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    The Court of Appeal's recent decision in Al Sadeq v. Dechert LLP, finding that evidence may have been incorrectly withheld, provides welcome clarification of the scope of legal professional privilege, including the application of the iniquity exception, says Tim Knight at Travers Smith.

  • BT Case May Shape UK Class Action Landscape

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    The first opt-out collective action trial commenced in Le Patourel v. BT in the U.K. Competition Appeal Tribunal last month, regarding BT's abuse of dominance by overcharging millions of customers, will likely provide clarification on damages and funder returns in collective actions, which could significantly affect the class action regime, say lawyers at RPC.

  • Key Points From EC Economic Security Screening Initiatives

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    Lawyers at Herbert Smith analyze the European Commission's five recently announced initiatives aimed at de-risking the EU's trade and investment links with third countries, including the implementation of mandatory screening mechanisms and extending coverage to investments made by EU companies that are controlled subsidiaries of non-EU investors.

  • Following The Road Map Toward Quantum Security

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    With the Financial Conduct Authority’s recent publication of a white paper on a quantum-secure financial sector, firms should begin to consider the quantum transition early — before the process is driven by regulatory obligations — with the goal of developing a cybersecurity architecture that is agile while also allowing for quantum security, say lawyers at Cleary.

  • Why EU Ruling On Beneficial Ownership May Affect The UK

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    Following the EU judgment in Sovim v. Luxembourg that public access to beneficial ownership information conflicts with data protection rights, several British overseas territories and dependencies have recently reversed their commitment to introduce unrestricted access, and challenges to the U.K.’s liberal stance may be on the cards, says Rupert Cullen at Allectus Law.

  • Opinion

    Labour Should Reconsider Its Discrimination Law Plans

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    While the Labour Party's recent proposals allowing equal pay claims based on ethnicity and disability, and introducing dual discrimination, have laudable intentions and bring some advantages, they are not the right path forward as the changes complicate the discrimination claim process for employees, say Colin Leckey and Tarun Tawakley at Lewis Silkin.

  • AI Is Outpacing IP Law Frameworks

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    In Thaler v. Comptroller-General, the U.K. Supreme Court recently ruled that artificial intelligence can't be an inventor, but the discussion on the relationship between AI and intellectual property law is far from over, and it's clear that technology is developing faster than the legal framework, says Stephen Carter at The Intellectual Property Works.

  • Tracing The History Of LGBTQ+ Rights In The Workplace

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    Pride History month is a timely reminder of how recent developments have shaped LGBTQ+ employees' rights in the workplace today, and what employers can do to ensure that employees are protected from discrimination, including creating safe workplace cultures and promoting allyship, say Caitlin Farrar and Jessica Bennett at Farrer.

  • Ruling In FCA Case Offers Tips On Flexible Work Requests

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    In Wilson v. Financial Conduct Authority, the Employment Tribunal recently found that the regulator's rejection of a remote work request was justified, highlighting for employers factors that affect flexible work request outcomes, while emphasizing that individual inquiries should be considered on the specific facts, say Frances Rollin, Ella Tunnell and Kerry Garcia at Stevens & Bolton.

  • Pension Scheme Ruling Elucidates Conversion Issues

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    In Newell Trustees v. Newell Rubbermaid UK Services, the High Court recently upheld a pension plan's conversion of final salary benefits to money purchase benefits, a welcome conclusion that considered several notable issues, such as how to construe pension deeds and when contracts made outside scheme rules can determine benefits, say Ian Gordon and Jamie Barnett at Gowling.

  • New Fraud Prevention Offense May Not Make Much Difference

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    By targeting only large organizations, the Economic Crime Act's new failure to prevent fraud offense is striking in that, despite its breadth, it will affect so few companies, and is therefore unlikely to help ordinary victims, says Andrew Smith at Corker Binning.

  • Aldi Design Infringement Case Highlights Assessment Issues

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    The forthcoming English Court of Appeal decision in Marks and Spencer v. Aldi, regarding the alleged infringement of design rights, could provide practitioners with new guidance, particularly in relation to the relevant date for assessment of infringement and the weight that should be attributed to certain design elements in making this assessment, say Rory Graham and Georgia Davis at RPC.

  • Generative AI Raises IP, Data Protection And Contracts Issues

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    As the EU's recent agreement on the Artificial Intelligence Act has fueled businesses' interest in adopting generative AI tools, it is crucial to understand how these tools utilize material to generate output and what questions to ask in relation to intellectual property, data privacy and contracts, say lawyers at Deloitte Legal.

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