Commercial Contracts

  • March 29, 2024

    10th Circ. Says Insurance Payout Deal In Jet Sale Is Invalid

    An aircraft seller does not owe a purchaser $500,000 in insurance proceeds intended to cover repairs to the aircraft's permanent engines and the installation of temporary engines, the Tenth Circuit affirmed, saying an agreement to pay the proceeds was invalid because of a mutual mistake of fact.

  • March 29, 2024

    Klehr Harrison Exits Athlete-Poaching Claims, Citing Conflict

    Klehr Harrison Harvey Branzburg LLP has ended its representation of sports memorabilia brokers ensnared in two sports agencies' battle in Pennsylvania federal court over a contract with former Detroit Lions wide receiver Kenny Golladay, citing concerns about an unspecified conflict of interest.

  • March 29, 2024

    Epiq Says Chubb Owes Costs In Clergy Abuse Data Leak Case

    Epiq Corporate Restructuring LLC has sued Chubb-affiliated insurers in Connecticut federal court seeking to be reimbursed for $2.5 million in settlement costs and roughly $1.8 million for its defense of litigation over Epiq's disclosure of sex abuse survivors' names in a Chapter 11 case.

  • March 29, 2024

    Dentons Europe Says Houston Co. Owes $4.7M In Legal Fees

    International law firm Dentons Europe CS LLP has accused a Houston-area company, self-described as a leader in kidnap and ransom resolution and crisis response, of failing to pay more than $4.7 million in legal fees in connection with the development of a port in Africa.

  • March 29, 2024

    DraftKings Rips Former Exec's 'Lies' In Ongoing Fanatics Spat

    Former DraftKings executive Michael Hermalyn lied in his opposition last week to its preliminary injunction request, just as he had during his departure to rival Fanatics and throughout a trade secrets and breach of contract suit against him, the company has told a Massachusetts federal court in defending its injunction request.

  • March 29, 2024

    Lawmakers Call For Robinson-Patman Act Revival

    A group of lawmakers is urging the Federal Trade Commission to reinvigorate enforcement of the Robinson-Patman Act, a Roosevelt-era wholesale pricing statute that fell out of use in the 1970s, to help small businesses and stem the power of dominant grocery chains.

  • March 29, 2024

    5 Appellate Arguments Benefits Attys Should Watch In April

    A defense contractor will square off with the government over pension obligations, workers at an auto parts retailer and Georgetown University staffers will look to revive suits claiming their retirement savings were mismanaged, and a ban on gender-affirming care for minors will get an en banc review. Here are five argument sessions that should be on benefits attorneys' radar in April.

  • March 28, 2024

    Penile Implant Doc Awarded $18.3M After Trade Secrets Trial

    A California federal judge on Thursday awarded more than $18.3 million in royalties and damages to a urologist who won a jury trial verdict last year over a competitor's theft of penile implant trade secrets.

  • March 28, 2024

    Telecom Co. Wants Rival Sanctioned In Contract Row

    Florida telecom Local Access LLC is again seeking sanctions against the Chicago-based rival it's suing over a contract dispute, claiming that Peerless Network destroyed records and refuses to turn over revenue information it's been seeking since 2017, even after a Florida federal judge directed the company to do so.

  • March 28, 2024

    United Airlines Beats Class Cert. Bid In COVID Refund Suit

    Passengers who say United Airlines used the COVID-19 pandemic as cover for refusing to reimburse them for cost-cutting cancelations cannot pursue their case as a class because their claims turn on too many individual questions, an Illinois federal judge determined Wednesday.

  • March 28, 2024

    Chancery Tosses Mixmax Derivative Suit

    A stockholder who filed a derivative suit against two Mixmax Inc. directors without first notifying the company's board has failed to prove that a majority of the board was too compromised to respond to the shareholder's concerns, so the lawsuit must be dismissed, a Delaware Chancery Court judge ruled.

  • March 28, 2024

    Foxwoods Tribal Owner Loses $76M COVID Insurance Appeal

    The Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation, which owns and operates the Foxwoods Resort Casino in Connecticut, did not meet a key burden when suing its insurer for more than $76 million in losses tied to the COVID-19 pandemic, the state's intermediate-level appeals court ruled Thursday in declining to revive the litigation.

  • March 28, 2024

    Faruqi & Faruqi Beats 5 Firms To Lead NewAge Investor Suit

    A Colorado district judge has selected two clients of Faruqi & Faruqi LLP to lead an investor class action accusing the executives and directors of wellness company NewAge Inc. of securities fraud, saying the plaintiff with an even bigger financial interest is unfit for appointment because he hid his "troubling" background.

  • March 28, 2024

    Auto Parts Mogul Must Face Lender's $127M Trust Fraud Suit

    An auto parts mogul must face allegations that he tampered with assets in a trust that owes hundreds of millions of dollars to a lending agent, a Michigan federal judge said this week after ruling the lender has plausibly alleged the mogul made fraudulent transfers to hinder the debt repayment.

  • March 28, 2024

    NC Atty Says Career Coaching Business Stiffed Him On Pay

    A North Carolina lawyer said this week that he hasn't been paid for his work at a career coaching business in which he owns a minority stake after he discovered the company was bleeding funds and rife with mismanagement, according to an amended state business court complaint.

  • March 28, 2024

    Mercedes, Insurer Don't Owe Reimbursement For Vehicle Fire

    Mercedes-Benz's North American research arm and its insurer don't owe reimbursement to a commercial real estate operator's insurer for $1 million in damages stemming from a vehicle fire at a testing facility, a Michigan federal judge ruled, finding that Mercedes' insurer issued commercial general liability coverage, not property protection insurance.

  • March 28, 2024

    Timberwolves Owner Calls Off $1.5B Sale To A-Rod, Lore

    Glen Taylor, the longtime majority owner of the NBA's Minnesota Timberwolves and the WNBA's Minnesota Lynx, confirmed Thursday he will not sell the teams for $1.5 billion to former MLB star Alex Rodriguez and entrepreneur Marc Lore, publicly stating the two would-be buyers missed the deadline to acquire a controlling interest.

  • March 28, 2024

    McCarter & English Wins Extra $1.8M In Client Billing Suit

    A Connecticut federal judge has found that McCarter & English LLP is entitled to another $1.8 million on top of the $1.85 million it has already been granted as a prejudgment remedy in a contract dispute, saying the former client on the hook for the award must also disclose assets under oath that could support the total $3.65 million award.

  • March 28, 2024

    Fired Alston & Bird Aide Fights Arbitration Of Vax Claims

    An Alston & Bird LLP staffer fired after refusing to get vaccinated for COVID-19 told a Georgia federal court that it should refuse to force her discrimination suit into arbitration, since her employment contract was not a matter of interstate commerce.

  • March 28, 2024

    NBCUniversal, DeLorean Settle 'Back To The Future' TM Suit

    NBCUniversal Media LLC has settled a trademark infringement suit over royalty payments for its use of the iconic DeLorean DMC-12 sports car on "Back to the Future" merchandise, according to a notice filed Tuesday in California federal court.

  • March 28, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen investors target fraudsters who ran a fake film tax scheme, Barclays Bank sue privately owned Russian bank PJSC Sovcombank, easyGroup bring a trademark infringement claim against online casino TGI Entertainment for its "easybet" word sign, and a bioethanol fuel company hit high-profile individuals connected to the collapsed Elysian Fuels scheme. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • March 27, 2024

    No New Trial For Hedge Fund Boss In Forex Rigging Case

    A New York federal judge on Friday refused to acquit or call for a new trial for a U.K.-based hedge fund chief convicted of illegally manipulating a currency exchange rate, rejecting his argument that his alleged conduct lacked sufficient ties to the United States.

  • March 27, 2024

    AI Software Co. Hid Oil Biz Partnership's Collapse, Suit Says

    Executives and directors of artificial intelligence company C3.ai Inc. have been hit with a shareholder derivative suit in California federal court claiming they failed to disclose that the company's partnership with oil company Baker Hughes Co. was falling apart and that its sales team was experiencing high turnover.

  • March 27, 2024

    Energy Co. Origis Exits Investor Suit Over Devalued Shares

    Renewable energy company Origis USA Inc. has escaped a suit by former shareholders after a New York federal judge concluded that the plaintiffs failed to show that the company was privy to an alleged scheme by its now-former CEO to induce them to sell their stakes for considerably less than the $1.4 billion they were later sold for.

  • March 27, 2024

    Texas Appeals Court Nixes Injunction In Bitcoin Mining Dispute

    A Texas state appeals court chucked a temporary injunction Wednesday that would have forced a property owner to keep providing electricity and access to a bitcoin mining company, ruling Thursday that the injunction was lacking in specifics and insufficient under Texas law.

Expert Analysis

  • Del. Dispatch: The 2023 Corporate Cases You Need To Know

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    Corporate and mergers and acquisitions litigation has continued at a fevered pace this year, with the Delaware courts addressing numerous novel issues with important practical implications, including officer exculpation and buyer aiding-and-abetting liability, say attorneys at Fried Frank.

  • Contract Disputes Recap: Termination and Accrual

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    Edward Arnold and Bret Marfut at Seyfarth Shaw examine three recent decisions that illustrate why contractors should consider, during the bidding process, impediments to their ability to meet contract requirements, and the need to track the accrual dates of individual claims that may arise during performance to avoid being time-barred.

  • The Year In FRAND: What To Know Heading Into 2024

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    In 2023, there were eight significant developments concerning the fair, reasonable and nondiscriminatory patent licensing regime that undergirds technical standardization, say Tom Millikan and Kevin Zeck at Perkins Coie.

  • How Attorneys Can Be More Efficient This Holiday Season

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    Attorneys should consider a few key tips to speed up their work during the holidays so they can join the festivities — from streamlining the document review process to creating similar folder structures, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • What DOD Commercial Product Rule Means For Contractors

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    A recent amendment to the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement, along with forthcoming changes to the definition of what constitutes a subcontract, will offer some relief for commercial products and services contractors, but the U.S. Department of Defense should do more to reduce regulatory burdens, say Daniel Ramish and Jonathan Shaffer at Haynes Boone.

  • How Int'l Student-Athlete Law Would Change The NIL Game

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    Recently proposed legislation to allow international student-athletes the opportunity to profit from their name, image and likeness without violating their F-1 nonimmigrant student visa status represents a pivotal step in NIL policy, and universities must assess and adapt their approaches to accommodate unique immigration concerns, say attorneys at Phelps Dunbar.

  • A Former Bankruptcy Judge Talks 2023 High Court Rulings

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    In 2023, the U.S. Supreme Court issued four bankruptcy law opinions — an extraordinary number — and a close look at these cases signals that changes to the U.S. Bankruptcy Code will have to come from Congress, not the courts, says Phillip Shefferly at the University of Michigan Law School.

  • Series

    Children's Book Writing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Becoming a children's book author has opened doors to incredible new experiences of which I barely dared to dream, but the process has also changed my life by serving as a reminder that strong writing, networking and public speaking skills are hugely beneficial to a legal career, says Shaunna Bailey at Sheppard Mullin.

  • 5 Steps For Healthcare Companies After Biden's AI Order

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    Rather than simply monitoring for the issuance of agency guidelines on artificial intelligence in the wake of President Joe Biden's October executive order, health and life sciences companies should take action now and begin building internal operational and technical infrastructures designed to govern the use of AI, says Joy Sharp at Faegre Drinker.

  • 7 Ways To Address Unknowns In Outsourcing Contracts

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    Amid rising business uncertainty, companies outsourcing critical functions should build flexibility into their contracts and adopt several contracting approaches to be prepared for a large range of unknown conditions, say Brad Peterson and Laura Buchanan at Mayer Brown.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • When Patients Have Standing For Hospital Antitrust Suits

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    Brown v. Hartford Healthcare Corp., recently decided by a Connecticut state court, provides a useful examination of how antitrust standing issues may be analyzed when patients directly sue a healthcare system for anti-competitive conduct, says Charles Honart at Stevens & Lee.

  • Insurer's '600-Lb. Life' Win Shows Why Fraud Suits Don't Stick

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    A Texas federal court’s recent ruling that Philadelphia Indemnity Co. did not fraudulently induce Megalomedia, the production company behind reality show “My 600-Lb. Life,” into purchasing insurance, demonstrates why a policyholder’s fraudulent inducement claim against an insurer will rarely succeed, says Robert Tugander at Rivkin Radler.

  • What 3rd Circ. Gets Wrong About Arbitration Enforcement

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    The Third Circuit and other courts should correct their current law, exemplified by the Third Circuit's recent decision in Henry v. Wilmington Trust, requiring a motion to dismiss based on an arbitration clause because it conflicts with the Federal Arbitration Act, the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, and — with regard to the improper-venue approach — U.S. Supreme Court precedent, says David Cinotti at Pashman Stein.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

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