Commercial Contracts

  • April 12, 2024

    Jane Street Says Millennium, Ex-Workers Stole Trade Secrets

    Trading firm Jane Street Group LLC sued rival Millennium Management LLC and two former employees in New York federal court Friday, alleging they stole a confidential trading strategy and have reaped "massive profits from this theft."

  • April 12, 2024

    Gilstrap Rejects Jury Instruction Tweaks In Samsung Retrial

    U.S. District Judge Rodney Gilstrap on Friday largely denied jury instruction requests made by both Samsung and G+ Communications ahead of a damages retrial in Texas federal court in litigation over wireless network patents, rejecting each company's ideas for limiting what's presented to jurors.

  • April 12, 2024

    Dunn DeSantis Expands San Diego Office With 7 Attorneys

    Dunn DeSantis Walt & Kendrick LLP recently expanded its San Diego office with the addition of seven employment law attorneys, the firm said in a statement.

  • April 12, 2024

    Sports Co.'s Logistics Shutdown Suit Survives Dismissal Bid

    A Washington federal judge has partially rejected a logistics company's dismissal bid in a manufacturer's lawsuit over a cyberattack that allegedly stunted operations, criticizing the "obtuse" argument that their deal didn't explicitly require the contractor to shield the client from such breaches.  

  • April 12, 2024

    Virgin Fest Wins $2M In Del. After Calif. Music Event Bust

    A festival-promoting interest of British billionaire Richard Branson's empire secured a $2 million judgment in Delaware's Superior Court Friday against a music festival producer, previously known as Kaaboo LLC, after a court finding that Kaaboo provided an unsupported, $10 million value for a California festival before Virgin Fest purchased the business.

  • April 12, 2024

    TRO Won't Save Auto Supplier From Fallout, Judge Says

    A Colorado federal judge on Friday denied an auto part supplier's bid to force a business partner to follow through on an exclusivity deal, ruling that a temporary restraining order may not prevent the supplier from having to shut down a facility.

  • April 12, 2024

    Connecticut Credit Union Settles Overdraft Fee Lawsuit

    Connecticut-based Connex Credit Union Inc. has agreed to settle a proposed class action that challenged $35 overdraft fees in "authorize positive, settle negative" transactions, according to a request that seeks to cancel a state court hearing in the matter.

  • April 12, 2024

    Republicans Warn CFPB Against Pursuing Arbitration Rule 2.0

    Two Republican lawmakers are cautioning the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau against heeding calls for another rulemaking to restrict arbitration provisions in consumer financial contracts, warning that such an effort would be a "significant abuse" of the agency's authority.

  • April 12, 2024

    Denver Jury Says Dish Wireless Didn't Flout Cell Tower Lease

    A Denver jury has rejected a telecommunications infrastructure company's claim that Dish Wireless Inc. breached a lease for cell tower sites by failing to pay at least $22 million in extra rent, with jurors reaching a unanimous verdict after eight days of trial.

  • April 12, 2024

    Capital Recruiter Awarded $7.8M In Back Fees In Breach Suit

    An Atlanta-area capital recruiting firm is owed more than $7.8 million in lost commissions from a former financial technology client that violated its agreement to pay the recruiter to connect it with investors, according to a verdict from a Georgia federal jury.

  • April 12, 2024

    ITC To Look Into Motorola's 5G IP Claims Against Ericsson

    Motorola is taking its 5G intellectual property battle with Ericsson to the U.S. International Trade Commission, with the agency agreeing to launch an investigation into Motorola's accusations of patent infringement against the Swedish company.

  • April 12, 2024

    Mediation Not Required In River Authority Price Hike Row

    The Texas Supreme Court on Friday reversed a lower court decision that the San Jacinto River Authority was required to mediate claims with two Houston-area cities over unpaid amounts for groundwater services, writing that contract provisions for alternative dispute resolution "do not serve as limits" on a waiver of governmental immunity.

  • April 12, 2024

    Tribes Look To Overturn Enbridge's Line 5 Mich. Tunnel Permit

    Several tribal nations are asking the Michigan Court of Appeals to overturn and remand a state commission's permit approval that allows Enbridge Energy to build a Line 5 pipeline tunnel project beneath the Straits of Mackinac, arguing that they and others were barred from introducing evidence relevant to the final decision.

  • April 12, 2024

    NJ Firm Wants Boardwalk Malpractice Suit Tossed For Good

    Hankin Sandman Palladino Weintrob & Bell has called on a New Jersey federal court to lift a stay and allow the firm to pursue summary judgment in a legal malpractice lawsuit from a couple over their investment in an Atlantic City Boardwalk amusement park, which resulted in an $11.8 million claim against the investors.

  • April 12, 2024

    Gas Co. Accuses Tech Partner Of 'Snake Oil Salesman' Tactics

    A Houston natural gas company asked a federal court Thursday to revoke a state settlement agreement between it and a partner who allegedly provided it with faulty monitoring equipment, calling the company a "modern-day snake oil salesman" that retaliated when it was "called on its failures."

  • April 12, 2024

    Off The Bench: Ohtani 'Victim' In Theft, Arbitration Nod To NFL

    In this week's Off The Bench, Shohei Ohtani looks to get off the hook on sports-betting allegations while his former interpreter faces charges, the NFL wins a critical court victory in the Brian Flores lawsuit, and troubled WWE founder Vince McMahon cuts even more financial ties with the company.

  • April 12, 2024

    Chubb Unit Must Contribute To Fatal Crash Deal, Lowe's Says

    A Chubb unit wrongly refused to contribute its $10 million policy limits to a settlement in a Texas state court suit over a crash involving a Lowe's employee that killed an infant and seriously injured the child's parents, the home improvement giant has told a North Carolina federal court.

  • April 12, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen footwear brand Dr. Martens hit online retailer Temu with a passing off claim, Welsh soccer club Swansea sue its former head coach Russell Martin, Russian diamond tycoon Dmitry Tsvetkov file a claim against his former business Equix Group Ltd., and U.S. bank Omega Financial Corporation hit African oil and gas company Tende Energy with a claim. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • April 11, 2024

    Wash. Justices Side With EB-5 Firm Over Arbitration Award

    Washington's high court ruled on Thursday that the payment of an arbitration award does not resolve a case seeking to confirm that award, standing by a lower court's decision to enter a confirmation order on an investment firm's $11.5 million win against a beleaguered developer over missed payments on a loan.

  • April 11, 2024

    Investors Again Seek Asset Freeze To Enforce $60M Awards

    Two Chinese investment firms have again urged a California federal court to impose a worldwide freeze against a renewable energy company's assets as they seek to enforce about $60 million in arbitral awards, saying the company is in increasing financial distress.

  • April 11, 2024

    FTC's Bedoya Looking For Market Power In Pricing Cases

    Federal Trade Commissioner Alvaro Bedoya said Thursday he is most interested in bringing potential cases under the Robinson Patman Act when a company is using its market power to gain an unfair advantage over smaller rivals.

  • April 11, 2024

    FCC Says Satellite Co.'s Dispute With Backer Belongs In Court

    The Federal Communications Commission on Thursday told a satellite company and its financial backer to take their squabble over a withdrawn enforcement petition to court, rejecting BIU LLC's bid to reopen an administrative proceeding first prompted by Spectrum Five.

  • April 11, 2024

    Wells Fargo Wants Ex-CEO's $34M Back-Pay Suit Tossed

    Wells Fargo & Co. has asked a California state court to throw out a lawsuit filed by former CEO Timothy Sloan that seeks $34 million in compensation he alleges was wrongfully withheld from him, a payout the bank maintains it doesn't owe.

  • April 11, 2024

    NJ Town Pays $5.5M To Exit Claims It Steered Deloitte HQ Deal

    Morristown, New Jersey, has agreed to pay $5.5 million to settle claims that officials meddled in a project to relocate accounting firm Deloitte's headquarters to one town site in an attempt to direct the project to another owned by developers they preferred.

  • April 11, 2024

    Flopped Casino SPAC Investor Sues In Del. To Block Payout

    An investor in a special purpose acquisition company that made a doomed, $2.7 billion effort to buy a casino in the Philippines has asked Delaware's Court of Chancery to prevent the SPAC from redeeming its outstanding shares, arguing it would violate Delaware law because the SPAC is insolvent.

Expert Analysis

  • How Retail Tenants Can Avoid Paying Rent Prematurely

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    When negotiating leases for spaces in shopping centers, retail tenants should ensure that the language specifies they only need to begin paying rent when the center is substantially occupied as a whole, as it can be difficult to modify leases that are executed without co-tenancy requirements or termination rights, say Joshua Bernstein and Benjamin Joelson at Akerman.

  • Policy Misrepresentations Carry Insurance Rescission Risks

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    The Second Circuit's recent decision in Medical Mutual v. Gnik, finding that material misrepresentation in a clinic's insurance applications warranted policy rescission, is a clear example of the far-reaching effects that misrepresentations can have and provides a reminder that policyholders should employ relatively straightforward steps to decrease risks, say attorneys at Hunton.

  • Analyzing New EU Measure To Prevent Reexports To Russia

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    Niels Ersbøll, Alexander Italianer and Laura Beuls at Arnold & Porter offer a comprehensive overview of the European Union's new rule requiring export agreements to contain a clause prohibiting the reexport of goods to Russia, and discuss what companies should do to ensure compliance.

  • 3 Tech Sourcing Best Practices That Are Relevant For AI

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    It might be tempting to think that sourcing artificial intelligence tools requires a completely new set of skills, but the best practices that lead to a good deal are much the same as traditional technology procurement, says Mia Rendar at Pillsbury.

  • Weisselberg's Perjury At Trial Spotlights Atty Ethics Issues

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    Former Trump Organization executive Allen Weisselberg’s recent guilty plea for perjury in the New York attorney general's civil fraud trial should serve as a reminder to attorneys of their ethical duties when they know a client has lied or plans to lie in court, and the potential penalties for not fulfilling those obligations, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • Practicing Law With Parkinson's Disease

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    This Parkinson’s Awareness Month, Adam Siegler at Greenberg Traurig discusses his experience working as a lawyer with Parkinson’s disease, sharing both lessons on how to cope with a diagnosis and advice for supporting colleagues who live with the disease.

  • Series

    Playing Hockey Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Nearly a lifetime of playing hockey taught me the importance of avoiding burnout in all aspects of life, and the game ultimately ended up providing me with the balance I needed to maintain success in my legal career, says John Riccione at Taft.

  • A Snapshot Of The Evolving Restrictive Covenant Landscape

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    Rachael Martinez and Brooke Bahlinger at Foley highlight recent trends in the hotly contested regulation and enforcement of noncompetition and related nonsolicitation covenants, and provide guidance on drafting such provisions within the context of stand-alone employment agreements and merger or acquisition transactions.

  • For Lawyers, Pessimism Should Be A Job Skill, Not A Life Skill

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    A pessimistic mindset allows attorneys to be effective advocates for their clients, but it can come with serious costs for their personal well-being, so it’s crucial to exercise strategies that produce flexible optimism and connect lawyers with their core values, says Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Handling Customer Complaints In Bank-Fintech Partnerships

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    As regulators mine consumer complaint databases for their next investigative targets, it is critical that fintech and bank partners adopt a well-defined and monitored process for ensuring proper complaint handling, including by demonstrating proficiency and following interagency guidance, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Trump's NY Civil Fraud Trial Spotlights Long-Criticized Law

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    A New York court’s recent decision holding former President Donald Trump liable for fraud brought old criticisms of the state law used against him back into the limelight — including its strikingly broad scope and its major departures from the traditional elements of common law fraud, say Mark Kelley and Lois Ahn at MoloLamken.

  • What NAR Settlement Means For Agent Commission Rates

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    If approved, a joint settlement agreement between the National Association of Realtors and a class of home sellers will likely take the onus off home sellers to compensate buyers' agents, affecting considerations for all parties to real estate transactions, say attorneys at Jones Foster.

  • Opinion

    Requiring Leave To File Amicus Briefs Is A Bad Idea

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    A proposal to amend the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure that would require parties to get court permission before filing federal amicus briefs would eliminate the long-standing practice of consent filing and thereby make the process less open and democratic, says Lawrence Ebner at the Atlantic Legal Foundation and DRI Center.

  • 4 Ways To Motivate Junior Attorneys To Bring Their Best

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    As Gen Z and younger millennial attorneys increasingly express dissatisfaction with their work and head for the exits, the lawyers who manage them must understand and attend to their needs and priorities to boost engagement and increase retention, says Stacey Schwartz at Katten.

  • How 3 Unfolding Cases Could Affect The Energy Industry

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    Three judicial decisions now in the pipeline — Texas' challenge to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's methane regulations, Delaware's climate suit against big energy companies, and a case before the Supreme Court of Texas on royalty lease interpretation — could have important implications for the energy industry, say Michelle Scheffler and Rachael Cox at Skadden.

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