Discrimination

  • April 15, 2024

    High Court Turns Away Fired Male Doctor's Sex Bias Suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court refused Monday to review a cardiologist's unsuccessful gender bias suit alleging he was fired after being falsely accused of mistreating female colleagues, despite his argument that the Second Circuit used the wrong legal standard when it backed the case's dismissal.

  • April 15, 2024

    High Court Won't Take Up Black Librarian's Race Bias Suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined Monday to hear a challenge by a Black librarian from Alabama to an Eleventh Circuit decision that shut down her suit alleging she was fired for complaining about a Confederate celebration.

  • April 15, 2024

    EEOC Maintains Broad Take On PWFA In Final Rule

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission unveiled its final rule implementing the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act on Monday, largely adopting a sweeping pro-worker interpretation of the year-old law.

  • April 15, 2024

    1st Circ. Reopens Fired Whole Foods Worker's BLM Mask Suit

    The First Circuit reinstated a lawsuit accusing Whole Foods of unlawfully disciplining and then firing an employee who wore a Black Lives Matter mask at work, overturning the Amazon-owned supermarket chain's pretrial win.

  • April 12, 2024

    UMG Seeks Escape From Woman's Diddy Sex Assault Suit

    UMG Recordings Inc. urged a New York state judge on Thursday to dismiss it from a lawsuit accusing hip-hop mogul Sean "Diddy" Combs and R&B artist Aaron Hall of sexually assaulting a woman in 1990, saying the woman's claims are untimely and have nothing to do with the music company.

  • April 12, 2024

    AAA Wants Dismissal Over Depo No Show For Solar Eclipse

    AAA asked a Florida federal court to toss a former employee's gender discrimination suit after he skipped out on a deposition to watch the solar eclipse, part of a pattern of nonprosecution and delay of the case that AAA says should warrant dismissal.

  • April 12, 2024

    Dunn DeSantis Expands San Diego Office With 7 Attorneys

    Dunn DeSantis Walt & Kendrick LLP recently expanded its San Diego office with the addition of seven employment law attorneys, the firm said in a statement.

  • April 12, 2024

    'Much More Is Coming': Experts See Wave Of AI-Related Suits

    Legal experts speaking Friday at the University of California, Berkeley School of Law's symposium on artificial intelligence and evidence in civil litigation warned that broadening usage and increased regulation will lead to a wave of litigation over the technology, leaving courts to analyze the "black box" of corporate AI algorithms to determine liability.

  • April 12, 2024

    Berry Appleman Faces Disability Bias Suit By Ex-Tech Lead

    Global immigration law firm Berry Appleman & Leiden is facing a disability discrimination suit filed Friday in Texas federal court by its former software tech lead, who says the firm set him up to fail when he sought reasonable accommodations for a coding project due to side effects from his medication.

  • April 12, 2024

    Petition Watch: Judge DQs, 'Excessive' Damages & Price Wars

    A former al-Qaida member has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to clarify disqualification protocol for judges overseeing a case related to their prior work as a government attorney, and energy drink manufacturers want the court to develop a modern-day test to determine if companies qualify as price-discrimination competitors. Here's four high court petitions filed recently that you might've missed.

  • April 12, 2024

    Jackson Lewis Hires Employment Litigator In Baltimore

    Employer-side firm Jackson Lewis PC has added a former U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission litigator to its Baltimore office who says her experience with the federal bias watchdog gives her a comprehensive view on how to advise clients.

  • April 12, 2024

    Nurse Accused Of Drinking Keeps Disability Bias Suit Alive

    A Pennsylvania federal judge declined to toss the crux of a nurse's disability bias suit alleging the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center forcibly sedated him after claiming he was drunk on the job, ruling the former worker put forward enough detail showing the incident may have been prejudicial.

  • April 12, 2024

    11th Circ. Axes Religious Bias Suit Against LinkedIn

    An Eleventh Circuit panel on Friday tossed a Florida woman's suit claiming LinkedIn banned her for spreading COVID-19 vaccine misinformation, finding she abandoned her appeal by failing to support her arguments.

  • April 12, 2024

    Chicago Water Workers' Race Bias Suit Headed To Trial

    The City of Chicago can't dodge a lawsuit alleging its water management department created a work environment replete with racist slurs and subjected Black workers to harsher punishment than white colleagues, with an Illinois federal judge ruling Friday the workers provided enough evidence to proceed to trial.

  • April 12, 2024

    What Employers Should Know About Fla., Ariz. Abortion Bans

    Recent state supreme court decisions approving strict abortion bans in Arizona and Florida will have effects that are felt in the workplace, experts said, warning that employers should be prepared to accommodate workers and deal with disagreements. Here, Law360 looks at four things employers in those states, and in others that have implemented or may implement abortion bans, should be prepared to tackle.

  • April 12, 2024

    Whole Foods Illegally Sought Group Chats, NLRB Judge Says

    Whole Foods illegally requested group chat messages between a fired employee and co-workers as part of a Title VII case now before the First Circuit, a National Labor Relations Board judge ruled, finding the co-workers have a right to shield communications about their protected activities.

  • April 12, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Twitter Wants Age Bias Suit Tossed

    In the coming week, attorneys should keep an eye out for the potential dismissal of a proposed age discrimination class and collective action against Twitter Inc. and its successor, X Corp. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters on deck in California.

  • April 12, 2024

    NY Forecast: 2nd Circ. Hears Tech Co. Retaliation Suit

    This week, the Second Circuit will consider a former marketing manager's lawsuit claiming that the head of the technology company where she worked sexually harassed her and that she was fired after she refused his advances. Here, Law360 explores this and other cases on the docket in New York.

  • April 12, 2024

    Off-Road Vehicle Dealer Strikes Deal In EEOC Sex Bias Suit

    A motor sports retailer will settle a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission suit alleging it told a female sales manager her role was being scrapped and fired her, only to replace her with a less-experienced man, according to a filing in Oklahoma federal court.

  • April 11, 2024

    4th Circ. Backs Navy's Win In Black Employee's Bias Case

    The Fourth Circuit refused to upend the U.S. Navy's defeat of a Black civilian employee's lawsuit alleging he lost a promotion because he'd complained about being treated worse than white colleagues, finding Thursday he failed to overcome the government's reasoning that another candidate had better qualifications.

  • April 11, 2024

    Split 6th Circ. Upends Jail Worker's $1.5M Win In USERRA Suit

    A split Sixth Circuit panel on Thursday overturned a former county jail employee's $1.5 million jury trial win in his lawsuit alleging he was wrongly accused of taking invalid military leave and then fired, despite a dissent calling the majority's finding that he waived his right to sue "deplorable."

  • April 11, 2024

    Jewish Attys Sue Union Over Dues After Pro-Palestine Stance

    A public defenders union violated the First Amendment by forcing two Jewish attorneys who oppose its pro-Palestine rhetoric to continue paying dues, the New York City-based attorneys claimed in a federal lawsuit filed Thursday, naming the city and their employer as defendants as well.

  • April 11, 2024

    Full 8th Circ. Hears Ark. Bid To Revive Youth Trans Care Ban

    An en banc panel of the Eighth Circuit weighing whether to revive an Arkansas state law that banned gender-affirming care for children and teens heard oral arguments Thursday, as Arkansas officials sought to demonstrate that the law does not unconstitutionally discriminate based on sex.

  • April 11, 2024

    2nd Circ. Rules Flores Can't Block NFL's Arbitration Challenge

    The Second Circuit on Thursday handed the NFL a win in its effort to overturn a decision that kept former Miami Dolphins head coach Brian Flores' racial discrimination lawsuit out of arbitration, ruling Flores cannot cross-appeal the NFL's appeal of a lower court decision leaving the suit in federal court.

  • April 11, 2024

    Black Workers, Fish Farm Settle Claims Of Migrant Hiring Bias

    Black farmers and a Mississippi-based fish farm have agreed to settle claims that the farm pushed out the U.S. citizen farmers in favor of Mexican migrant workers, they announced to a Mississippi federal court on Thursday.

Expert Analysis

  • Sex Harassment Arbitration Exemption: Devil Is In The Date

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    A Federal Arbitration Act amendment that exempts workplace sexual harassment claims from arbitration is muddled in ongoing confusion about its chronological reach — and as many such cases begin to run up against applicable statutes of limitations, the clock is ticking for claimants to bring their actions in court, says Abe Melamed at Signature Resolution.

  • Top 10 Employer Resolutions For 2024

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    From technological leaps to sea changes in labor policy to literal sea changes, 2024 provides opportunities for employers to face big-picture questions that will shape their business for years to come, say Allegra Lawrence-Hardy and Lisa Haldar at Lawrence & Bundy.

  • Lessons Learned From 2023's Top FMLA Decisions

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    This year’s most significant Family and Medical Leave Act decisions offer lessons on the act's technical requirements, including the definition of serious health condition, compliance with notice requirements and whether it is permissible to give an employee substantial extra work upon their return from leave, says Linda Dwoskin at Dechert.

  • Artificial Intelligence Is In Need Of Regulation — But How?

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    Since most of the artificial intelligence-related laws in 2023 were part of more extensive consumer privacy law, the U.S. still has a lot of work to do to build consensus on how to oversee AI, and even who should do the regulating, before moving forward on specific and reasonable guidelines as AI's capabilities grow, say Nick Toufexis and Paul Saputo at Saputo Toufexis.

  • Lessons Learned From 2023's Top ADA Decisions

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    This year saw the courts delving into the complexities of employee accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act in the post-pandemic workplace, going beyond bright-line rules with fact-intensive inquiries that are likely to create uncertainty for employers, says Linda Dwoskin at Dechert.

  • What's Ahead For Immigrant Employee Rights Enforcement

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    The U.S. Department of Justice’s increased enforcement related to immigration-based employment discrimination is coupled with pending constitutional challenges to administrative tribunals, suggesting employers should leverage those headwinds when facing investigations or class action-style litigation, say attorneys at Jones Day.

  • Top 10 Whistleblowing And Retaliation Events Of 2023

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and federal and state courts made 2023 another groundbreaking year for whistleblower litigation and retaliation developments, including the SEC’s massive whistleblower awards, which are likely to continue into 2024 and further incentivize individuals to submit tips, say attorneys at Proskauer.

  • 10 Steps To Reduce Risks From AI Employment Tools

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    In light of the White House’s recent executive order on responsible use of artificial intelligence, companies using AI tools to make employment decisions should take steps to understand and mitigate the legal risks posed by these products and keep up with the rapidly evolving regulations that govern them, say attorneys at Cooley.

  • What Employers Can Learn From EEOC's 2023 ADA Priorities

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    Between a spike in Americans with Disabilities Act suits filed by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in 2023 and the agency’s newly released priorities, the EEOC has provided employers a preview of several ADA issues — like web accessibility, pregnancy discrimination and inflexible policies — it will likely focus enforcement on next year, says Stacy Bunck at Ogletree.

  • Eye On Compliance: EEOC Focus On Workplace AI

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    With the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s recent guidance and enforcement focus on the use of artificial intelligence tools during the hiring process and other job-related assessments, companies should be mindful that anti-discrimination laws apply equally to both human- and AI-generated decisions, say Laura Stutz and Lisa Ackerman at Wilson Elser.

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Sets Bostock, Faith Exemption Up For Review

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    The Fifth Circuit's Braidwood v. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission decision could tee up U.S. Supreme Court review of whether employing an individual to whose protected class the employer objects infringes on the employer's religious beliefs, potentially narrowing LGBTQ worker protections from the high court's 2020 Bostock v. Clayton County decision, says Adam Grogan at Bell Law.

  • Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • Why Employers Should Refrain From 'Quiet Firing'

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    While quiet firing — when an employer deliberately makes working conditions intolerable with the goal of forcing an employee to quit — has recently been identified in the news as a new trend, such constructive discharge tactics have been around for ages, and employers would do well to remember that, comparatively, direct firings may provide more legal protection, says Robin Shea at Constangy.