Discrimination

  • April 11, 2024

    Partisan Split On Display As EEOC Makes Policy Strides

    Since gaining a Democratic majority in August, the five-seat U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission found common ground on age and race bias claims, but split down party lines on all of its major regulatory moves and cases addressing emerging issues like LGBTQ bias.

  • April 11, 2024

    Supermarket Chain Settles Fired Manager's Sex Bias Suit

    A supermarket chain will pay a former store manager $25,000 to shutter her New York federal court suit claiming she was paid less than her male counterparts, and she was fired after complaining that her male supervisor favored those male colleagues, according to a Thursday filing.

  • April 11, 2024

    Texas Staffing Co. Settles Noncitizen Bias Claims

    A Texas staffing company settled the federal government's claims that it discriminated against a man by requiring he show his green card to prove he can work in the U.S., the U.S. Department of Justice announced Thursday.

  • April 11, 2024

    Ex-COO Sues NJ Law Firm, Claiming Sexual Harassment

    The former chief operating officer of New Jersey personal injury giant Garces Grabler & LeBrocq PC sued the firm Wednesday for sexual harassment and discrimination, alleging firm leaders unfairly impeded her from doing her job and made lewd comments about her.

  • April 11, 2024

    Ex-NFL Players Near Settlement In Race-Norming Benefits Suit

    Two former players whose lawsuit accuses the NFL's disability benefit plans of awarding them lower benefits because they are Black told a Maryland federal court they have had "productive" meetings with the defendants and are near a settlement proposal.

  • April 11, 2024

    Tech Co. To Pay Ex-Worker $7K To End Anxiety Firing Suit

    A computer and cellphone accessory manufacturer will pay nearly $7,000 to end a former worker's suit alleging unpaid overtime as well as a failure to accommodate her extreme anxiety, a Georgia federal judge ordered Thursday, approving the deal.

  • April 11, 2024

    Medical Co. Owes Ex-Worker $20M For Race Bias, Jury Says

    A ventilator supply company should pay a Black former customer service representative more than $20 million for failing to intervene when her supervisor used racist slurs and acted aggressively toward her, a Pennsylvania federal jury said.

  • April 11, 2024

    Eye Care Company Settles EEOC Sex Harassment Probe

    A Colorado-based eye care company struck a deal with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to end an agency investigation into allegations that the company's owner sexually harassed an employee until that employee quit, the EEOC said Thursday.

  • April 11, 2024

    Ex-Ellenoff Grossman Atty Faces Possible Firing Suit Remand

    A former Ellenoff Grossman & Schole LLP associate's suit saying she was fired for protesting sexual harassment should return to state court, a New York federal judge recommended, saying the federal court can't enforce arbitration pacts invalidated by a 2022 amendment to the Federal Arbitration Act.

  • April 11, 2024

    United Airlines Defeats Religious Bias Suit Over Vax Mandate

    United Airlines workers failed to furnish "basic factual details" to back up their case alleging the airline discriminated against employees for their religious beliefs by requiring a COVID-19 vaccination, an Illinois federal judge said, tossing the suit.

  • April 11, 2024

    Apple Must Face Former Executive's Trimmed Age Bias Suit

    A California federal judge narrowed a former Apple executive's suit alleging his age led the company to withhold bonuses, though the suit stands, as the judge said it sufficiently showed a contract was breached when the company did not pay a hefty stock retention bonus.

  • April 10, 2024

    Disney Defends Right To Fire 'Star Wars' Actor Over X Posts

    The Walt Disney Co. and Lucasfilm Ltd. asked a California federal judge to toss Gina Carano's claims that she was unlawfully fired from "The Mandalorian" for her social media posts, arguing they have a constitutional right as artistic creators to decide which actors to employ to express their artistic messages.

  • April 10, 2024

    Marshalls Failed to Stop Sex Harassment, Cashier Says

    A Marshalls cashier said in a suit filed in New York federal court Wednesday that the company failed to step in when she complained that a male co-worker sexually harassed her and other customers, and instead moved her into more physically demanding jobs out of retaliation.

  • April 10, 2024

    Littler Adds Shareholder With Gov. Background To Wis. Office

    Littler Mendelson PC brought on a shareholder who beefed up his practice serving as acting chief legal counsel to former Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, a role that now informs his work defending employers undergoing government investigations.

  • April 10, 2024

    Wells Fargo Can't Bar Atty From Deposition, NC Judge Rules

    Wells Fargo lost its bid to stop the lawyer of a fired investment director, who is accusing the bank of disability discrimination, from questioning his former supervisor, with a North Carolina federal judge saying the bank fell short of showing that the attorney's previous representation of the supervisor was related in any way to the current action.

  • April 10, 2024

    Novant Wants Fired Exec's Atty Fees Cut After Trip To 4th Circ.

    An attorney representing a former Novant Health executive should receive about $140,000 after prevailing on claims that his client was fired for being white amid a diversity push, the healthcare network said, urging a North Carolina federal judge to reduce the ex-executive's request for about $152,000 in attorney fees.

  • April 10, 2024

    3rd Circ. Revives Retaliation Suit Against Pa. House GOP

    The Third Circuit breathed new life Wednesday into a former district office manager's lawsuit alleging she was fired by the Pennsylvania House Republican Caucus for reporting she had discovered mold in a state representative's office, finding she was acting outside her job duties when she spoke up.

  • April 10, 2024

    DOJ Sues School District For Denying Remote Work Request

    An Arkansas school district violated federal anti-discrimination law when it denied an asthmatic employee's request to switch to temporary telework during the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a lawsuit filed Tuesday by the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • April 10, 2024

    Ohio Appeals Court Remands AFSCME Reinstatement Row

    An Ohio appeals court sent back to a lower court an arbitration award dispute over a township's claim that a maintenance worker "abandoned his position," finding Wednesday that an arbitrator did had the power under a labor contract to order reinstatement and make the employee whole.

  • April 10, 2024

    Alston & Bird Pushes Arbitration Of COVID Vax Claims

    Alston & Bird LLP urged a Georgia federal court to reject a former aide's objection to a magistrate judge's recommendation to force her to arbitrate her claims alleging she was fired after refusing to get vaccinated for COVID-19.

  • April 10, 2024

    Ex-Reed Smith Atty Can't DQ Judge In Bias Suit Against Firm

    A former Reed Smith LLP attorney failed in her bid to have a New Jersey state judge disqualified from her gender discrimination suit against the firm, with the judge on Wednesday turning down her argument that he improperly reviewed a certification from the firm's general counsel.

  • April 10, 2024

    EEOC Throws Weight Behind AI Bias Suit Against Workday

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission said Workday shouldn't be able to dodge a Black job seeker's California federal court suit claiming it uses biased algorithms to screen out applicants, arguing that the software company can't evade liability by claiming it's not an employer.

  • April 10, 2024

    Major Lindsey Wins Bid To Have Sex Assault Suit Arbitrated

    A former Major Lindsey & Africa LLC employee's sexual assault lawsuit against the legal recruiting giant must go to arbitration, a New York state judge has decided.

  • April 10, 2024

    Ex-Coupang Atty Fights Bid To Toss Whistleblower Suit

    A former in-house attorney at South Korean conglomerate Coupang told a Washington federal judge this week that his whistleblower claims against the company are valid according to the terms of his employment contract.

  • April 10, 2024

    Ex-Judge Dropped From Harassment Suit After NJ Courts' Win

    A New Jersey municipal court administrator has agreed to end a suit alleging she was sexually harassed by a former municipal court judge after a state superior court ruled she could not include the Administrative Office of the Courts as a defendant in the case.

Expert Analysis

  • 5 New Calif. Laws Employers Need To Know

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    Now is a good time for employers to evaluate personnel rules to keep pace with California’s newly adopted employee protections, which go into effect early next year and include laws regarding reproductive loss leave, cannabis use, workplace violence prevention and noncompete agreements, say attorneys at Farella Braun.

  • 3 Employer Strategies To Streamline Mass Arbitrations

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    Workers under arbitration agreements have gained an edge on their employers by filing floods of tedious and expensive individualized claims, but companies can adapt to this new world of mass arbitration by applying several new strategies that may streamline the dispute-resolution process, says Michael Strauss at Alternative Resolution Centers.

  • How AI 'Cultural Fit' Assessments Can Be Analyzed For Bias

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    Attorneys at Sanford Heisler explore how the use of artificial intelligence to assess workplace cultural fit may provide employees with increased opportunities to challenge biased hiring practices, and employers with more potential to mitigate against bias in algorithmic evaluations.

  • High Court's Old, Bad Stats Analysis Can Miss Discrimination

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    Courts and practitioners should reconsider a common statistical test for evidence of employment discrimination, created by the U.S. Supreme Court for its 1977 Castaneda and Hazelwood cases, because its “two or three standard deviations” criteria stems from a misunderstanding of statistical methods that can dramatically minimize the actual prevalence of discrimination, says Daniel Levy at Advanced Analytical Consulting Group.

  • Transparency And Explainability Are Critical To AI Compliance

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    Although there is not yet a comprehensive law governing artificial intelligence, regulators have tools to hold businesses accountable, and companies need to focus on ensuring that consumers and key stakeholders understand how their AI systems operate and make decisions, say Chanley Howell and Lauren Hudon at Foley & Lardner.

  • In Focus At The EEOC: Emerging And Developing Issues

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    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's recently finalized strategic enforcement plan highlights how the agency will prioritize its limited resources over the next four years, and the most notable emerging issues include ensuring protections for pregnant workers and those dealing with long-term COVID-19 effects, says Jim Paretti at Littler.

  • Employer Takeaways From 2nd Circ. Equal Pay Ruling

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    The Second Circuit 's recent decision in Eisenhauer v. Culinary Institute of America reversed a long-held understanding of the Equal Pay Act, ultimately making it easier for employers to defend against equal pay claims brought under federal law, but it is not a clear escape hatch for employers, say Thelma Akpan and Katelyn McCombs at Littler.

  • AI Isn't The Wild West, So Prepare Now For Bias Risks

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    In addition to President Joe Biden's recent historic executive order on safe, secure and trustworthy artificial intelligence, there are existing federal and state laws prohibiting fraud, defamation and even discrimination, so companies considering using or developing AI should take steps to minimize legal and business risks, says civil rights attorney Farhana Khera.

  • AI's Baked-In Bias: What To Watch Out For

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    The federal AI executive order is a direct acknowledgment of the perils of inherent bias in artificial intelligence systems, and highlights the need for legal professionals to thoroughly vet AI systems, including data and sources, algorithms and AI training methods, and more, say Jonathan Hummel and Jonathan Talcott at Ballard Spahr.

  • 'Miss Manners' Scenarios Holds Job Accommodation Lessons

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    Robin Shea at Constangy looks at the potentially negative legal consequences for employers who follow some advice recently given in the Washington Post's "Miss Manners" column, and offers solutions of her own.

  • How Biden's AI Order Stacks Up Against Calif. And G7 Activity

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    Evaluating the federal AI executive order alongside the California AI executive order and the G7's Hiroshima AI Code of Conduct can offer a more robust picture of key risks and concerns companies should proactively work to mitigate as they build or integrate artificial intelligence tools into their products and services, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Handling Religious Objections To Abortion-Related Job Duties

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    While health care and pharmacy employee religious exemption requests concerning abortion-related procedures or drugs are not new, recent cases demonstrate why employer accommodation considerations should factor in the Title VII standard set forth by the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2023 Groff v. DeJoy ruling, as well as applicable federal, state and local laws, say attorneys at Epstein Becker.

  • Transgender Worker Rights: A Guide For California Employers

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    California employers should know their obligations under overlapping state and federal law to protect the rights of their transgender, nonbinary and gender-nonconforming workers, and implement best practices to avoid discriminating in how they hire and promote, offer medical benefits to, and prevent harassment of these employees, says Michael Guasco at Littler.