Labor

  • April 17, 2024

    School District To Pay $200K To End EEOC Age Bias Suit

    An Illinois school district will pay about $206,000 to bring an end to a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission suit claiming it capped salary increases for teachers over 45 to dodge increased retirement payments, the agency said Wednesday.

  • April 17, 2024

    NLRB Says Co. Violated Labor Law With Wage Suit Questions

    A chemical manufacturer illegally questioned an employee about his conversations with co-workers and union stewards linked to a wage and hour lawsuit, the National Labor Relations Board concluded, upholding an agency judge's decision about the workers' confidentiality interests.

  • April 17, 2024

    Welch's Rehire Challenge Should Fail, Judge Recommends

    Welch Foods should comply with an arbitrator's order to rehire a Teamsters-represented worker fired for making vulgar comments to a female co-worker, a Pennsylvania federal magistrate judge said, recommending that the district judge toss the company's challenge to the order.

  • April 16, 2024

    NLRB Revives Worker's Union Ouster Bid At Bus Co. Plant

    The National Labor Relations Board reinstated a worker's bid to oust the Communications Workers of America at a bus manufacturing facility in Kentucky on Tuesday, finding the employee made a good faith effort to send signatures for a decertification petition via fax.

  • April 16, 2024

    NLRB Official OKs Teamsters Vote At Food Distributor

    A group of delivery drivers at a United Natural Foods Inc. facility in Florida may vote in a representation election with a Teamsters local, a National Labor Relations Board official determined, saying the company couldn't show that an end to the workers' employment was imminent.

  • April 16, 2024

    Starbucks, Union In Talks To Settle Bargaining Fight

    Starbucks and Workers United are in talks to settle a National Labor Relations Board suit accusing the company of refusing to bargain labor contracts, according to a notice released Tuesday.

  • April 16, 2024

    Chattanooga VW Vote To Test UAW's Ability To Unionize South

    Workers at a Volkswagen facility in Chattanooga, Tennessee, will begin voting this week on whether to be represented by the United Auto Workers, an election that union experts call a key early test of the UAW's ability to organize automakers in the historically union-averse South.

  • April 16, 2024

    Meet The Atty For An Ex-Union Leader Facing His 3rd Trial

    The only thing standing between ex-Philly union leader John Dougherty and a third conviction is attorney Greg Pagano, and he feels confident going into the next trial that things will be different. 

  • April 16, 2024

    Mortgage Co. Fights NLRB GC's Bid For Broad Remedies

    A mortgage lender told the National Labor Relations Board to reject a request from agency attorneys seeking an expansive make-whole remedy for workers who were affected by illegal work rules, arguing that such relief would flout federal labor law.

  • April 15, 2024

    Coal Exec's Widow Seeks Atty Fees After Toss Of $6.5B Suit

    The widow of a bankrupt coal company's former president requested $525,000 in attorney fees and costs Monday after a D.C. federal judge tossed a suit alleging her husband's estate and another business owed a union pension plan $6.5 billion, saying the plan's trustees can afford to pay.

  • April 15, 2024

    Union, Workers Fight Subpoena Order Over NY Starbucks

    Workers United and former Starbucks employees objected to a federal judge's order to comply with a subpoena of communications about workers' sentiments toward the union at a Long Island, New York, store, arguing the company's information bids run counter to workers' confidentiality and privacy rights.

  • April 15, 2024

    2nd Circ. Affirms Telecom Co.'s $13M Union Pension Bill

    The Second Circuit upheld a New York federal court's determination that a telecommunications company owed $13 million in withdrawal liability to a multiemployer pension plan for electrical and contract workers, agreeing Monday with an arbitrator's finding that a construction industry exception didn't apply to the disputed work.

  • April 15, 2024

    Guard Claims Union Kept Her 'In The Dark' About Fees

    An International Guards Union of America affiliate did not give a U.S. Department of Homeland Security employee an audit report on agency fees and kept her "in the dark about its finances," she told a D.C. federal court, arguing the union violated its duty of fair representation.

  • April 15, 2024

    1st Circ. Reopens Fired Whole Foods Worker's BLM Mask Suit

    The First Circuit reinstated a lawsuit accusing Whole Foods of unlawfully disciplining and then firing an employee who wore a Black Lives Matter mask at work, overturning the Amazon-owned supermarket chain's pretrial win.

  • April 15, 2024

    Justices Won't Review Ex-NYC Union Head's Bribery Rap

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to take up the appeal of a former New York City union president who was convicted of taking bribes from now-defunct hedge fund Platinum Partners, rejecting a petition that argued his attorney failed to tell him about the trial judge's conflicts of interest.

  • April 12, 2024

    Hospital Asks DC Circ. To Rethink 'Successor Bar' Ruling

    A Puerto Rico hospital on Friday asked the D.C. Circuit to reconsider a February panel decision that upheld the National Labor Relations Board's finding that the hospital unlawfully withdrew recognition from a union, saying it was too deferential to the board's interpretation of federal labor law.

  • April 12, 2024

    Starbucks Warns Of Open 'Floodgates' With NLRB Deference

    Starbucks told the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday that siding with the National Labor Relations Board's arguments about deference to the agency for federal court injunction requests would "open the floodgates" in other ways for deference to federal agencies.

  • April 12, 2024

    DC Circ.'s NLRB Rebuke Aids Employers' Monitoring Defense

    A recent D.C. Circuit decision knocking the National Labor Relations Board for finding a trucking company illegally barred a driver from covering his in-cabin camera could be good news for employers amid an initiative by the board's chief prosecutor to curb workplace monitoring.

  • April 12, 2024

    Mich. High Court Snapshot: Atty Sanctions Kick Off April

    The Michigan Supreme Court returns Tuesday for its April session, hearing oral arguments about judges' ability to sanction lawyers for past attorneys' work in a case, what defendants say could be double recovery in wrongful death cases, and an attempt to use a Larry Nassar-inspired law to sue Catholic priests for decades-old abuse allegations.

  • April 12, 2024

    US Steel Stockholders Greenlight $14.9B Sale To Nippon

    U.S. Steel said Friday that its shareholders have "overwhelmingly" approved the American steel company's nearly $15 billion takeover by Japan's Nippon Steel, a positive development in a deal that's otherwise received a high degree of political and regulatory scrutiny. 

  • April 12, 2024

    Ex-Philly Union Leader Denied Bench Trial In Extortion Case

    A Pennsylvania federal judge has denied twice-convicted former International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 98 leader John "Johnny Doc" Dougherty's request to have his third criminal trial — this time over extortion charges — handled by a judge instead of a jury.

  • April 12, 2024

    Whole Foods Illegally Sought Group Chats, NLRB Judge Says

    Whole Foods illegally requested group chat messages between a fired employee and co-workers as part of a Title VII case now before the First Circuit, a National Labor Relations Board judge ruled, finding the co-workers have a right to shield communications about their protected activities.

  • April 12, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Twitter Wants Age Bias Suit Tossed

    In the coming week, attorneys should keep an eye out for the potential dismissal of a proposed age discrimination class and collective action against Twitter Inc. and its successor, X Corp. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters on deck in California.

  • April 12, 2024

    NY Forecast: 2nd Circ. Hears Tech Co. Retaliation Suit

    This week, the Second Circuit will consider a former marketing manager's lawsuit claiming that the head of the technology company where she worked sexually harassed her and that she was fired after she refused his advances. Here, Law360 explores this and other cases on the docket in New York.

  • April 11, 2024

    Jewish Attys Sue Union Over Dues After Pro-Palestine Stance

    A public defenders union violated the First Amendment by forcing two Jewish attorneys who oppose its pro-Palestine rhetoric to continue paying dues, the New York City-based attorneys claimed in a federal lawsuit filed Thursday, naming the city and their employer as defendants as well.

Expert Analysis

  • 5 NLRA Changes To Make Nonunion Employers Wary In 2024

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    As the National Labor Relations Board continues pushing an aggressive pro-union agenda and a slate of strict workplace rules, nonunion employers should study significant labor law changes from 2023 to understand why National Labor Relations Act compliance will be so crucial to protecting themselves in the new year, say attorneys at Hunton.

  • NLRA Expansion May Come With Risks For Workers

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    The last few years have seen a rapid expansion of the National Labor Relations Act to increase labor law coverage in as many ways and to as many areas as possible, but this could potentially weaken rather than strengthen support for unions and worker rights in the U.S., says Daniel Johns at Cozen O’Connor.

  • What The NLRB Wants Employers To Know Post-Cemex

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    Recent guidance from the National Labor Relations Board illuminates prosecutorial goals following Cemex Construction Materials, a decision that upended decades of precedent, and includes several notable points to which employers should pay close attention, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • Top 10 Employer Resolutions For 2024

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    From technological leaps to sea changes in labor policy to literal sea changes, 2024 provides opportunities for employers to face big-picture questions that will shape their business for years to come, say Allegra Lawrence-Hardy and Lisa Haldar at Lawrence & Bundy.

  • Cos. Should Be On Guard After Boom In Unfair Labor Claims

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    The National Labor Relations Board's recent expansion of protected activity and imposition of case-by-case policies led to a historic boom in unfair labor practice charges in 2023, so companies should prepare for labor complaints to increase in 2024 by conducting risk assessments and implementing compliance plans, say Daniel Schudroff and Lorien Schoenstedt at Jackson Lewis.

  • 3 Developments That Will Affect Hospitality Companies In 2024

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    As the hospitality industry continues its post-pandemic recovery, it faces both challenges and opportunities to thrive in 2024, including navigating new labor rules, developing branded residential living spaces and cautiously embracing artificial intelligence, says Lauren Stewart at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Top 10 Whistleblowing And Retaliation Events Of 2023

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and federal and state courts made 2023 another groundbreaking year for whistleblower litigation and retaliation developments, including the SEC’s massive whistleblower awards, which are likely to continue into 2024 and further incentivize individuals to submit tips, say attorneys at Proskauer.

  • Starbucks Raise Ruling Highlights Labor Law Catch-22

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    A National Labor Relations Board judge recently ruled that Starbucks violated federal labor law when it gave raises to nonunion employees only, demonstrating that conflicts present in workforces with both union and nonunion employees can put employers in no-win situations if they don't consider how their actions will be interpreted, say attorneys at Duane Morris.

  • Del. Ruling Shows Tension Between 363 Sale And Labor Law

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    The Delaware federal court's ruling in the Braeburn Alloy Steel case highlights the often overlooked collision between an unstayed order authorizing an asset sale free and clear of successor liability under Section 363 of the Bankruptcy Code and federal labor law imposing successor liability on the buyer, say attorneys at Proskauer.

  • How AI Executive Order Aims To Compete For Foreign Talent

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    Immigration provisions within the Biden administration's executive order on artificial intelligence take a strategic approach to promoting the U.S. as a destination for AI and STEM talent by streamlining visa processing, enhancing educational and exchange programs, and improving current visa programs and pathways to permanent residency, says Eric Bord at Morgan Lewis.

  • A Gov't Contractor's Guide To Davis-Bacon Prevailing Wages

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    In light of shifting federal infrastructure priorities and recent updates to U.S. Department of Labor regulations, employers should take the time to revisit the basics of prevailing wage requirements for federal contractors under the Davis-Bacon Act and similar laws, says Timothy Taylor at Holland & Knight.

  • Business Takeaways From Biden's Global Labor Rights Memo

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    President Joe Biden's recent memorandum on protecting worker rights is one of the most expansive statements the administration has made regarding international labor rights policy, and reflects several points of which businesses should take note, including the government’s interest in working with the private sector on these issues and a notable focus on the transition to clean energy, say Tom Plotkin and Pegah Nabili at Covington.

  • How Employers Should Prep For NLRB, OSHA Collaboration

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    The National Labor Relations Board and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s recent announcement of increased interagency cooperation may suggest that each agency will be expanding its scope of inquiry moving forward, and signals that employers need to be prepared for inspections that implicate both OSHA and NLRB issues, say attorneys at Baker Donelson.

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