More Employment Coverage

  • March 27, 2024

    2nd Circ. Won't Revive Ex-NY Law Clerk's Harassment Suit

    The Second Circuit Wednesday agreed with a New York federal district court's dismissal of a suit brought by a former New York law clerk accusing the state's judicial system of covering for a judge she says sexually harassed her, holding that it lacked jurisdiction to hear the appeal.

  • March 26, 2024

    9th Circ. Unsure Uber Can Dodge Suit Over Slain Driver

    A pair of Ninth Circuit judges seemed to question Tuesday if Uber Technologies Inc. could avoid liability after a driver was murdered in a carjacking, with one judge asking if the law needed to catch up with new technology in a case where the company controlled information about the identity of riders.

  • March 26, 2024

    Ohio Health Staffing Co. Settles Visa Fraud Probe For $9.25M

    An Ohio healthcare staffing company has agreed to pay a $9.25 million penalty to resolve criminal and civil investigations that the U.S. Department of Justice was conducting into its visa sponsorship program over what the firm's chief executive officer called "problematic conduct in our visa process."

  • March 26, 2024

    Boeing Can't Exit Wash. Worker's Birth Defect Suit

    A Washington state judge has declined to throw out a lawsuit accusing Boeing of exposing a factory worker to chemicals that caused birth defects in his child, after casting doubt last month on the company's assertion it had no legal duty to protect employees' future children from foreseeable harm.

  • March 26, 2024

    NC Software Execs Ask To Raze Payroll Tax Fraud Conviction

    Two former software executives found guilty of failing to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in employment taxes have sought to wipe out their conviction based on what they allege was insufficient evidence presented by the government at trial.

  • March 25, 2024

    Boeing Called Out For 'Circular' Logic In Love-Triangle Murder

    A Washington federal judge suggested on Monday that it would be unfair to let Being avoid liability in the early stages of a case involving a love-triangle among workers that ended in murder, calling the argument against allowing litigation to move forward "circular."

  • March 25, 2024

    Judge Finalizes Ban On Taking $540M IP Fight To China

    An Illinois federal judge granted Motorola's request to stop Hytera from pursuing a non-infringement case against it in China, saying Monday that she would also start contempt proceedings in the case.

  • March 25, 2024

    Gorsuch Irked At Having To Decide $3K Furlough Dispute

    Justice Neil Gorsuch expressed incredulity that the U.S. Supreme Court has to resolve a Pentagon employee's $3,000 dispute stemming from a furlough decision, remarking Monday on the "extraordinary" lengths the government has gone to in fighting the case.

  • March 25, 2024

    Tesla, Travelers Settle Wrongful Death Coverage Dispute

    Tesla and a Travelers unit reached an agreement in the parties' dispute over coverage of a wrongful death lawsuit involving a construction worker at a company factory in Austin, shortly after a Texas federal judge declined to strike three of the insurers' defenses.

  • March 25, 2024

    Prior Deal Bars Issues-Only Classes In NCAA Football MDL

    An Illinois federal judge has denied a bid by former NCAA football players for issue-only classes in multidistrict litigation over concussion injuries, saying a settlement from a prior MDL specifically prohibits issue-only classes.

  • March 25, 2024

    Jury Hands Mortgage Co. $73K Win In Trade Secrets Fight

    An Ohio federal jury has found that Revolution Mortgage owes just over $73,700 to competitor Equity Resources in a case where Equity accused its rival of misappropriation of trade secrets.

  • March 25, 2024

    NC High Court Vacates Workers' Comp For Weight Loss Surgery

    A divided North Carolina Supreme Court has adopted a test for determining when someone is entitled to workers' compensation for treatment related to their workplace injury and, in doing so, reversed a ruling finding a preschool must pay for an employee's weight loss surgery.

  • March 22, 2024

    Activists Press Full 5th Circ. To Nix Nasdaq Diversity Rule

    Conservative groups opposing a requirement that Nasdaq-listed companies publicly disclose board diversity data are pressing the full bench of the Fifth Circuit to declare the rule unconstitutional, arguing the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's involvement in the rulemaking process transforms the requirement into an unconstitutional restraint on free speech. 

  • March 22, 2024

    Fired CFO Of Conn. Gas Co. Seeks $5.6M From Sale

    The former chief financial officer of Hocon Gas Inc., a propane and heating oil company serving three Northeastern states, says he was fired for dubious reasons after demanding his share of distributions ahead of a planned sale of the company and its affiliates, in a $5.6 million lawsuit in Connecticut state court.

  • March 22, 2024

    DraftKings' Suit Is 'Character Assassination,' Former VP Says

    A former DraftKings executive picked apart a trade secret suit brought against him in Massachusetts federal court by his ex-employer, saying it's an attempt to "torch his reputation" with questionable evidence that also demonstrates the company's practice of smearing employees who leave for better opportunities.

  • March 22, 2024

    'Love Is Blind' Contestant's Suit Sent To Arbitration

    A California judge on Friday held that claims against Netflix from a "Love Is Blind" contestant alleging she was matched with a violent drug addict must be sent to arbitration after finding that the arbitrability of the contract in question is not for the court to decide.

  • March 22, 2024

    6th Circ. Says Fired Doctor Got Enough Due Process

    The Sixth Circuit backed two Ohio healthcare companies and Wright State University's early wins against a former resident doctor's claims that she was improperly fired for unprofessional conduct, stating that all the parties involved engaged in "more than enough due process" before terminating her.

  • March 22, 2024

    Off The Bench: Ohtani Lawyers Up, UFC Settles, ACC Clash

    MLB superstar Shohei Ohtani enlists a Hollywood boutique to advise him amid a still-unfolding sports betting scandal, UFC forks over $335 million to settle a wage class action and Clemson's bid to join a new conference spills into court. Catch up with the sports and betting stories that had Law360's readers talking with this week's Off The Bench.

  • March 21, 2024

    10th Circ. Doubts Officers Can Get Redo In Training Attack

    A Tenth Circuit panel was skeptical Thursday that tactical officers at a Colorado supermax prison can challenge a trial court's decision not to hold an evidentiary hearing in a suit about a training exercise that turned violent, with one judge noting that the officers did not object at the time.

  • March 21, 2024

    Oil Worker's $4M Injury Verdict Tossed By Texas Justices

    A Texas appeals court on Thursday erased an oil worker's nearly $4 million jobsite injury award, ruling jurors should have had to determine if one of the companies held responsible for the accident was shielded from liability for lending employees to the other defendant.

  • March 21, 2024

    Barings' Exec Helped Raid Employees To Join Rival, Suit Says

    A former executive of the investment firm Barings LLC is accused of joining a rival firm who together conspired to hire away 21 Barings employees and then offered to buy the decimated Barings unit for "on the dollar" in "one of the largest corporate raids at an asset manager in years," a suit alleges.

  • March 21, 2024

    Ga. Justices Fear 'Massive Effect' Of Teacher Contract Claim

    Justices of Georgia's highest court appeared skeptical Thursday of claims from a teacher who said he was wrongly denied a contract renewal with his school district over a deadline dispute, with several justices worrying that siding with him could upend the standard contract renewal procedure for thousands of educators statewide.

  • March 21, 2024

    12 Ex-Constantine Cannon Attys Launch Whistleblower Firm

    A dozen attorneys who have represented whistleblowers from Facebook, Theranos and Boeing have left Constantine Cannon LLP to form their own stand-alone boutique to support whistleblowers and boost corporate accountability globally, according to a Thursday announcement.

  • March 21, 2024

    Plan Admin. Escapes Ex-Aerospace Execs' Death Benefits Suit

    A third-party administrator isn't liable for misrepresentation and negligence claims from former aerospace company executives over death benefits, a Pennsylvania federal judge has ruled, saying the administrator isn't to blame for the plaintiffs' lack of understanding about the termination of a deferred compensation plan.

  • March 21, 2024

    Faegre Drinker Hires Indianapolis Litigation Boutique Founder

    Faegre Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP has hired a founding partner of Indianapolis litigation boutique Hoover Hull Turner LLP, who joins the firm as a partner to continue her practice centered on business litigation matters, the firm recently announced.

Expert Analysis

  • How AI Executive Order Aims To Compete For Foreign Talent

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    Immigration provisions within the Biden administration's executive order on artificial intelligence take a strategic approach to promoting the U.S. as a destination for AI and STEM talent by streamlining visa processing, enhancing educational and exchange programs, and improving current visa programs and pathways to permanent residency, says Eric Bord at Morgan Lewis.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • How New Expert Rules Are Already Changing Court Decisions

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    Though not formally effective until last week, some courts have been relying for several years on amended federal rules clarifying judges’ gatekeeping role, so counsel should be prepared to justify their expert witnesses’ methodologies and expect additional motion practice on expert testimony admissibility, say Colleen Kenney and Daniel Kelly at Sidley.

  • Legal Lessons From Past World Cups To Keep In Mind For '26

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    The 2022 World Cup in Qatar and the 2023 Women's World Cup in Australia and New Zealand set new standards for sustainability, human rights and sponsorship — and with those new standards come new challenges for those involved in the planning of the 2026 World Cup in North America, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • 2nd Circ. Defamation Ruling May Chill NY Title IX Reports

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    The Second Circuit’s recent decision, holding accusers in Connecticut Title IX sexual misconduct cases are not immune to defamation claims, means that New York higher education institutions should reassess whether their disciplinary hearing procedures both protect due process and encourage victim and witness participation, says Nicole Donatich at Cullen and Dykman.

  • Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

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    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

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    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

  • How Color Psychology Can Help Tell Your Trial Narrative

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    Research shows that color is a powerful sensory input that affects memory and perception, so attorneys should understand how, when and why to use certain shades in trial graphics to enhance their narrative and draw jurors’ focus, says Adam Bloomberg at IMS Consulting.

  • A Look At Mass. Sports Betting Data Privacy Regulations

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    The Massachusetts Gaming Commission recently approved data privacy regulations under the state's sports wagering act to promote responsible gaming, showing a trend of regulators directing companies on how to protect personal information used by artificial intelligence systems, say Liisa Thomas and Kathryn Smith at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Title IX Grievance Rules Raise Due Process Questions

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    The U.S. Department of Education’s proposed Title IX regulations for campus disciplinary proceedings would ease the administrative burden on institutions, but raise fairness and due process questions that will likely lead to follow-on litigation, say Markus Funk and Christopher Wilkinson at Perkins Coie.

  • Understanding Discovery Obligations In Era Of Generative AI

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Attorneys and businesses must adapt to the unique discovery challenges presented by generative artificial intelligence, such as chatbot content and prompts, while upholding the principles of fairness, transparency and compliance with legal obligations in federal civil litigation, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Why Criminal No-Poach Cases Can Be Deceptively Complex

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    Mark Rosman at Wilson Sonsini discusses the reasons many criminal no-poach cases that appear simple are actually more complicated than they seem, following several jury trial acquittals and two dismissed cases.

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