Wage & Hour

  • April 23, 2024

    Divisive Cost Cap Deadline Looms For Calif. Healthcare Cos.

    California healthcare attorneys are preparing for the state's first cap on healthcare spending proposed by a new state office tasked with making care affordable. Industry leaders are sharply split on the viability of a proposed 3% target, which some say may ultimately do more harm than good for a state suffering from skyrocketing healthcare costs.

  • April 23, 2024

    Judge Overturns Biz's H-2B Ban, Blaming 'Gaslighting' Atty

    A U.S. Department of Labor administrative law judge overturned a decision to debar a Minnesota concessions stand company from the H-2B visa program over its failure to pay back wages and penalties, saying the small business's owner had only followed his attorney's advice — right into a legal disaster.

  • April 23, 2024

    Family Dollar Stiffs Assistant Managers On OT, Suit Says

    Family Dollar has not been paying its assistant managers overtime wages even though they regularly perform work off-the-clock like sorting money and cleaning the store, an ex-worker claimed in a proposed collective action filed in Tennessee federal court.

  • April 23, 2024

    Firefighters Want LA County's Early Win Bid Axed In Hotel Suit

    Los Angeles County firefighters urged a California federal judge to deny the county's bid for an early win in their suit alleging they weren't paid for time they spent quarantined in hotels during the COVID-19 pandemic, saying the motion attempts to use the courts as a "pawn to escape liability."

  • April 23, 2024

    Apple Settles Labor Fight Over COVID-19 Policy At Okla. Store

    An Apple Store in Oklahoma City has agreed to restore the sick time of workers who took off for COVID-19 since last August, pursuant to a recently announced settlement of an unfair labor practice charge filed by the workers' union.

  • April 23, 2024

    Virginia Contractor Owes $1.2M For Wage Violations

    A Virginia concrete contractor owes nearly $1.2 million in back wages, damages and fines for denying 81 workers their full pay, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Tuesday.

  • April 23, 2024

    Walmart Security Contractor Settles Guard's OT Suit

    A company that provides security for Walmart and an ex-worker told a Texas federal court they've agreed to end a lawsuit accusing the company of failing to pay guards overtime despite working 60 to 70 hours a week, and asked the court to close the case.

  • April 23, 2024

    DOL Unveils Final OT Rule That Raises Salary Limits

    The U.S. Department of Labor on Tuesday released its long-awaited final rule raising the salary thresholds for overtime exemptions, solidifying aspects of a proposal that faced opposition from Republicans and business groups.

  • April 22, 2024

    Ex-Twitter Workers Can't Arbitrate Until Class Cert. Resolved

    A proposed class of former employees of Twitter, now known as X, cannot yet force the company to move forward with their various employment claims in arbitration, a California federal judge determined Monday, saying the issue of class certification needs to be decided first.

  • April 22, 2024

    Uber Can't Ditch All Drivers' Pay Claims, Ill. Judge Says

    Three Uber drivers claiming they're unlawfully classified as independent contractors and therefore paid illegally must arbitrate those proposed collective claims, but one driver who fought the issue in a previous case can pursue his claim in court, an Illinois federal judge said Monday.

  • April 22, 2024

    NY Becomes First State In US To Mandate Paid Prenatal Leave

    With its budget passage Saturday, New York became the first state in the U.S. to implement paid leave for pregnant employees to attend doctors' appointments, expanding its paid sick time requirements to create a new bank of up to 20 hours for this purpose.

  • April 22, 2024

    Quest Owes OT For Login Time, Ex-Call Center Agent Says

    Quest Diagnostics hasn't been paying its call center agents for off-the-clock work, such as the time it takes them to log into computer systems and shut down the programs, an ex-worker alleged in a proposed collective action filed Monday in New Jersey federal court.

  • April 22, 2024

    Cleaning Crew Says United Airlines Unit Didn't Pay All OT

    A United Airlines subsidiary providing cleaning services on planes failed to properly pay cabin workers for the nonscheduled overtime they worked, according to a proposed class action the company removed to Colorado federal court.

  • April 22, 2024

    Comcast Cable Installation Techs Drop FLSA Suit

    Former Comcast cable installation technicians asked a Pennsylvania federal judge Monday to formally dismiss a proposed class action alleging a subsidiary of the company failed to pay for work completed before and after their shifts and during meal breaks, saying they reached a settlement.

  • April 22, 2024

    Calif. High Court Says Pretrial Inmates Can't Get Min. Wage

    The California Supreme Court on Monday ruled that pretrial detainees who work while in jail are not entitled to minimum wage and overtime claims under California's labor law, finding the state's penal code permitting such work covers nonconvicted individuals.

  • April 22, 2024

    Justices Skeptical Staying Arbitration Cases Burdens Courts

    The U.S. Supreme Court tackled Monday whether courts should stay or dismiss suits headed to arbitration, with some justices appearing skeptical of the argument that tossing the suits burdens courts less than pausing litigation.

  • April 22, 2024

    Ohio Transportation Co. To Pay $25K To End DOL OT Suit

    An Ohio transportation services company will pay $25,000 in back wages and liquidated damages to end a U.S. Department of Labor suit accusing it of stiffing workers on overtime wages, according to court papers filed Monday.

  • April 22, 2024

    Luxury Brand Seeks To Trim Workers' Recordkeeping Claims

    High-end fashion brand Comme Des Garçons asked a New York federal judge to toss recordkeeping claims that a proposed collective of employees brought as part of their suit alleging they were misclassified as managers and denied overtime wages, calling the claims derivative of the overtime allegations.

  • April 22, 2024

    DOL, Roofing Co. Ink $100K Deal To End OT Suit

    A Baltimore roofing company will pay $100,000 in back wages and liquidated damages to settle a U.S. Department of Labor suit alleging it denied workers overtime wages, according to court papers filed Monday.

  • April 22, 2024

    5 New State Employment Laws Passed This Year So Far

    State legislatures around the country are winding down legislative sessions that began in January, bringing newly enacted employment laws into effect in the coming months. From child labor to pay inequality to mandatory overtime, Law360 looks at five state laws that employers will have to comply with.

  • April 22, 2024

    Supreme Court Denies Amazon Bid To Review Arbitration Scope

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday denied Amazon's bid to review a Ninth Circuit decision on whether last-mile delivery drivers are exempt from the Federal Arbitration Act.

  • April 22, 2024

    Justices Won't Hear Bakery's Arbitration Exemption Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to again examine a carveout to a federal arbitration law for interstate transportation workers, in a case involving baked goods delivery drivers, after already issuing a decision in a similar case.

  • April 22, 2024

    Justices Won't Weigh If Domino's Drivers Arbitration-Exempt

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday passed on reviewing whether Domino's Pizza truck drivers are interstate transportation workers who are exempt from federal arbitration requirements, declining to pave the way for a ruling that could have expanded or narrowed the arbitration carveout.

  • April 19, 2024

    Uber, Lyft Ask Justices To Review Calif. Arbitration 'Loophole'

    Uber Technologies and Lyft Inc. asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review a California appellate court's decision rejecting their efforts to force into arbitration coordinated litigation alleging they misclassified drivers as independent contractors, saying the Golden State is trying to "create a loophole" in the Federal Arbitration Act.

  • April 19, 2024

    Wash. Hospital Workers Can't Replicate Related Wage Win

    A Washington state court ruled Friday that workers of a Seattle-area hospital system still have to prove that their employer's timekeeping and meal break policies violated state law, even though an affiliated healthcare system with policies the employees alleged were "virtually the same" was found liable in a similar case.

Expert Analysis

  • Ecolab Ruling Opens Doors For Percentage Bonuses In Calif.

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    California's Second Appellate District recently became the first court in the state to clear the air on percentage bonuses, providing employers who have wanted to offer such bonuses with a new option to do so without having to recalculate the overtime regular rate, says Paul Lynd at ArentFox Schiff.

  • How Employers Can Defend Against Claims Made In Bad Faith

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    When an employer becomes aware of an employee complaint, it should carefully research whether the claim could be characterized as frivolous or in bad faith, and then consider various defense strategies, say Ellen Holloman and Jaclyn Hall at Cadwalader.

  • Encouraging Labor Abuse Reports Beyond The PAGA Model

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    The recent stalling of several state bills modeled after California's Private Attorneys General Act, which would allow workers to sue on behalf of the state over labor violations, suggests budget-constrained regulators should consider alternative tools for incentivizing employees to flag workplace abuses, says Joseph Jeziorkowski at Valiant Law.

  • Eye On Compliance: Service Animal Accommodations

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    A Michigan federal court's recent ruling in Bennett v. Hurley Medical Center provides guidance on when employee service animals must be permitted in the workplace — a question otherwise lacking clarity under the Americans with Disabilities Act that has emerged as people return to the office post-pandemic, says Lauren Stadler at Wilson Elser.

  • Joint Employment Mediation Sessions Are Worth The Work

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    Despite the recent trend away from joint mediation in employment disputes, and the prevailing belief that putting both parties in the same room is only a recipe for lost ground, face-to-face sessions can be valuable tools for moving toward win-win resolutions when planned with certain considerations in mind, says Jonathan Andrews at Signature Resolution.

  • Takeaways From Virgin's Wage And Hour Class Action Loss

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    A California district court recently issued a $31 million judgment against Virgin America in a wage and hour class action brought by flight attendants, a reminder that the state Labor Code's reach extends beyond the Golden State when the facts show a strong connection to work performed there, says Julie O’Dell at Armstrong Teasdale.

  • There's More To The Helix FLSA Opinion Than Meets The Eye

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    At first blush, the U.S. Supreme Court's recent Helix decision seems remarkable for its determination that an oil rig worker who makes $200,000 a year can still be entitled to overtime, but the decision also offers two more important takeaways about how the Fair Labor Standards Act may be applied, says Nicholas Woodfield at The Employment Law Group.

  • What Employers Need To Know About New Breastfeeding Law

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    The recently enacted federal PUMP Act expands employers' existing obligations to provide breaks and space for certain employees to express breast milk, so employers should review the requirements and take steps to ensure that workers' rights are protected, say Sara Abarbanel and Katelynn Williams at Foley & Lardner.

  • 6 Labor Compliance Questions For Infrastructure Contractors

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    Eric Leonard at Wiley provides a checklist to help both traditional and nontraditional government contractors identify and understand the enhanced labor and employment compliance obligations they assume by taking on a project funded under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Termination Lessons From 'WeCrashed'

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper chat with Fulton Bank’s Allison Snyder about how the show “WeCrashed” highlights pitfalls companies should avoid when terminating workers, even when the employment is at will.

  • Clean Energy Tax Credits' Wage, Apprentice Rules: Key Points

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    The Inflation Reduction Act's complicated prevailing wage and apprenticeship requirements for clean energy facility construction tax credits recently took effect — and the learning curve will be more difficult for taxpayers who are not already familiar with such programs, say attorneys at Shearman.

  • New Rulings Show Job Duties Crucial To Equal Pay Act Claims

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    Two recent decisions from the Fourth and Tenth Circuits emphasize that it is an employee's actual responsibilities, and not just their job title, that are critical to a pay discrimination claim under the Equal Pay Act and can offer some lessons for employers in avoiding and defending these claims, say Fiona Ong and Lindsey White at Shawe Rosenthal.

  • Tips For Handling Employee Pay Scale Asks As Laws Expand

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    Due to the increase in pay transparency legislation, companies are being forced to get comfortable with pay-related discussions with their employees, and there are best practices employers can apply to ensure compliance with new laws and address the challenging questions that may follow, say Maria Stearns and Joanna Blake at Rutan & Tucker.