Wage & Hour

  • April 19, 2024

    Wash. Hospital Workers Can't Replicate Related Wage Win

    A Washington state court ruled Friday that workers of a Seattle-area hospital system still have to prove that their employer's timekeeping and meal break policies violated state law, even though an affiliated healthcare system with policies the employees alleged were "virtually the same" was found liable in a similar case.

  • April 19, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Abortions & Presidential Immunity

    The U.S. Supreme Court will return Monday for the term's final week of oral arguments, during which it will consider several high-stakes disputes, including whether a federal healthcare law can preempt state abortion bans and whether former President Donald Trump is entitled to immunity from criminal charges related to official acts.

  • April 19, 2024

    Calif. Panel Says Wedbush Waived Arbitration Flag Too Late

    A U.S. Supreme Court might have changed the arbitration landscape in suits involving California's Private Attorneys General Act, but Wedbush Securities Inc. still waited too long to try pushing out of court financial advisers' claims, a California state appeals court ruled.

  • April 19, 2024

    Package Couriers Want Quick Appeal In OT Suit

    A package courier asked an Ohio federal judge Friday to greenlight an appeal to the Sixth Circuit regarding the decertification of a collective of workers alleging a delivery company misclassified them as independent contractors and denied them overtime pay, saying an appeal could expedite the lawsuit.

  • April 19, 2024

    Farmworkers Must Clarify FLSA Release In Wage Deal

    A California federal judge identified two issues with a proposed wage and hour settlement between a class of farmworkers and their employer, saying the deal inexplicably releases federal claims that were never filed and the parties haven't formally notified the court of a plaintiff's death.

  • April 19, 2024

    Franchise Operator On Pitfalls Of Calif.'s Fast-Food Min. Wage

    Rich Reinis, a member of California's newly formed Fast Food Council, said he wants to keep fast food affordable, especially as industry workers now earn a $20 minimum wage. Here, Law360 speaks with Reinis about the council’s future.

  • April 19, 2024

    NY Forecast: Judge Considers School District Race Bias Suit

    This week a New York federal judge will consider a school district's bid to dismiss a lawsuit brought by a Black former technology specialist who claims he was fired after facing discrimination on the job based on his race. Here, Law360 explores this and other cases on the docket in New York.

  • April 19, 2024

    Oilfield Services Co. Wants Worker's OT Suit Arbitrated

    An oilfield services company told a Texas federal judge to send an ex-oil rig worker's unpaid overtime suit into arbitration, saying the workers had signed binding, valid arbitration agreements.

  • April 19, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Hilton Seeks To Undo Tips Class

    In the coming week, attorneys should watch for a potential ruling on whether a class of hotel banquet event workers can continue together with wage claims against San Francisco Hilton Inc., in a long-running case that paid a visit to the Ninth Circuit. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters coming up in California.

  • April 19, 2024

    Aviation Services Co. Paid Only Scheduled Shifts, Suit Says

    An aviation services company ignored work that a former training specialist did outside her scheduled shifts, the worker told a Washington federal court, accusing the company in a proposed class and collective action of owing workers wages.

  • April 18, 2024

    Jury Awards $98M To Wash. Healthcare Workers In Wage Suit

    A Seattle jury said Thursday a Washington-based healthcare system should pay thousands of its employees almost $100 million for its illegal timeclock rounding and meal break practices, an award that's expected to be doubled because a judge has already determined that the company's violations were willful.

  • April 18, 2024

    Qdoba To Pay $3.8M To Wrap Up Wash. Pay Transparency Suit

    Mexican restaurant chain Qdoba will pay $3.8 million to resolve a class action alleging it violated Washington state's pay transparency law when it failed to disclose pay information in job postings, according to a filing in state court.

  • April 18, 2024

    Arbitration Issue Lingers After Justices' Wage Case Ruling

    A U.S. Supreme Court ruling that a transportation worker arbitration carveout hinges on what workers do, not the industry in which they work, resolved one issue related to the exemption while avoiding others in delivery and ride-hail driver wage and hour litigation, attorneys said.

  • April 18, 2024

    Calif. Grocery Stores Pay $472K For OT Violations

    Three California grocery stores paid more than $472,000 in back wages, damages and fines for denying 60 workers their overtime wages, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Thursday.

  • April 18, 2024

    Building Groups Say They Can Fight Prevailing Wage Rule

    Several construction trade groups told a Texas federal judge that they don't need to point to specific members to support their argument that a U.S. Department of Labor final rule regulating prevailing wages will hurt them, urging the court to keep alive their suit challenging the rule.

  • April 18, 2024

    NY Appeals Court Revives AI Firm CLO's Claim For Pay

    In a significant ruling for executives and professionals, a New York state appeals court has reversed the dismissal of key claims in a former chief legal officer's lawsuit alleging he wasn't paid all wages owed after his employment ended at artificial intelligence company Amelia US LLC.

  • April 18, 2024

    Saladworks Operator Misclassified Asst. Managers, Suit Says

    A Pennsylvania-based franchisee of fast-casual salad eatery Saladworks misclassified its assistant managers as overtime-exempt even though they should have earned time-and-a-half wages for overtime hours, a former manager alleged in a proposed collective action filed in federal court Thursday.

  • April 18, 2024

    Buffalo Wild Wings Owes Pay For OT Work, Server Says

    Buffalo Wild Wings has not been paying its hourly employees overtime wages for time they spent working off the clock and didn't reimburse them for business expenses or allow them to take breaks, a server alleged in a proposed class action filed in California federal court.

  • April 18, 2024

    US Chamber, Groups Seek Win In DOL Contractor Rule Spat

    The U.S. Department of Labor acted illegally when it nixed a Trump-era rule determining workers' independent contractor status and issued a new rule, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and a slew of trade groups told a Texas federal court.

  • April 17, 2024

    Colo. Labor Dept. Says Amazon's Holiday Pay Must Be In OT

    The Colorado Department of Labor and Employment told the state Supreme Court that Amazon's holiday incentive pay is similar to shift differentials, backing warehouse workers' arguments that the pay should have been included in their overtime compensation.

  • April 17, 2024

    Drivers, Transport Cos.' $700K Wage Deal Nabs Initial OK

    A California federal judge placed the initial stamp of approval on a revised $700,000 settlement between a class of truck drivers, an agricultural product transportation company and labor contractor ending a wage lawsuit, saying the updated deal is an adequate resolution.

  • April 17, 2024

    Yacht Repair Co.'s Late Arguments Can't Save It From OT Suit

    A yacht repair company owes more than $55,000 in overtime and damages to a former employee, a Florida federal judge ruled, rejecting the company's Hail Mary argument that the worker was exempt from overtime under the Fair Labor Standards Act.

  • April 17, 2024

    Airplane Servicers Nod to Justices, Reiterate That Fueling Isn't Interstate Work

    Two companies that service airplanes alerted the Ninth Circuit to the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision regarding the applicability of a worker exemption from the Federal Arbitration Act, saying the high court's ruling supports their contention that fuel pumping is not interstate work that would trigger the carveout.

  • April 17, 2024

    NJ Landscaping Co. Pays $255K For OT Violations

    A New Jersey landscaping company paid nearly $255,000 in back wages and damages for denying 20 workers their overtime wages, the U.S. Department of Labor announced.

  • April 17, 2024

    NLRB Says Co. Violated Labor Law With Wage Suit Questions

    A chemical manufacturer illegally questioned an employee about his conversations with co-workers and union stewards linked to a wage and hour lawsuit, the National Labor Relations Board concluded, upholding an agency judge's decision about the workers' confidentiality interests.

Expert Analysis

  • Musician Classification Pointers For Wash. Hospitality Cos.

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    Following a recent increase in audits by the Washington State Employment Security Department concerning hospitality employers’ classification of musical performers, businesses are strongly encouraged to assess state law requirements governing their relationship with hired talent and ensure written contracts are in place, say Emily Bushaw and Shannon McDermott at Perkins Coie.

  • Employer Ramifications From Wash. Prevailing Wage Ruling

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    After the Washington Supreme Court's recent ruling in Associated General Contractors v. Washington that altered how prevailing wage rates are set, employers of public works projects can expect to see higher wage rates for their employees, say Cassidy Ingram and Brett Hill at Ahlers Cressman.

  • In 2023, Pursue The 'Why' Behind Employment Compliance

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    As employers approach new compliance requirements that will take effect on Jan.1, considering why these laws and regulations were put in place — rather than what must be done to satisfy them — can open greater opportunities to move ahead of the curve and align actions with company values and culture, says Christopher Ward at Foley & Lardner.

  • Employee Pay Takeaways From Computer Startup Time Ruling

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    The Ninth Circuit’s recent ruling in Cadena v. Customer Connexx, which held that time spent booting up laptops is compensable, is a reminder of how the continuous workday rule affects employee pay and provides insight on whether other types of tasks are integral and indispensable, say attorneys at Husch Blackwell.

  • IRS Starts Clock On Energy Projects' Labor Rule Exemption

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    A U.S. Department of the Treasury notice published this week started the 60-day clock for clean energy projects seeking to be grandfathered from having to meet new labor requirements to qualify for enhanced tax credits, and uncertainty about how the provisions will apply should be incentive for some investors to begin construction soon, say attorneys at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • Top 10 Labor And Employment Issues In M&A Transactions

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    In order to ensure that M&A transactions come to fruition in the current uncertain environment, companies should keep several labor and employment issues in mind during the due diligence process to minimize risk, says Cassidy Mara at Akerman.

  • Employer Lessons From Google's $118M Equal Pay Deal

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    The recent $118 million settlement in the Ellis v. Google class action over a systemic scheme directed at underpaying women can be used as the foundation for employers to implement better business practices and avoid lawsuits of this magnitude, say attorneys at Gordon & Rees.

  • State Law Compliance Considerations For Remote Job Posts

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    In light of the increasing prevalence of state and local laws mandating a salary range on job listings, employers should provide pay transparency when looking for remote workers in order to avoid potential penalties and litigation, says Eric Fox at Gordon & Rees.

  • Employers Should Note Post-Midterms State Law Changes

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    State ballot measures in the recent midterm elections could require employers to update policies related to drug use, wages, collective bargaining and benefit plans that offer access to abortion care — a reminder of the challenges in complying with the ever-changing patchwork of state workplace laws, say attorneys at Jackson Lewis.

  • PAGA Claims Are A Gamble As Calif. Justices Mull Uber Case

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    The California Supreme Court's pending Private Attorneys General Act decision in Adolph v. Uber will have significant repercussions for both employers and employees, potentially forcing employers to question whether there is any benefit to arbitrating individual PAGA claims, says Jonathan Andrews at Signature Resolution.

  • Why Companies Lose In Gig Worker Class Cert. Cases

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    The recent class certification of gig workers in Roman v. Jan-Pro Franchising in California and Bedoya v. American Eagle Express in New Jersey shows that companies who rely on uniform contracts and policies with independent contractors expose themselves to liability in a judicial climate that increasingly favors workers, say Joan Fife and Kevin Simpson at Winston & Strawn.

  • DOL Proposal Invokes ABC Test For Contractor Classification

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    The U.S. Department of Labor recently issued a proposed rule for determining whether workers are independent contractors or employees, that, if adopted, would effectively implement California's so-called ABC test for classification and substantially rewrite the employment playbook nationwide, says Ronald Zambrano at West Coast Employment Lawyers.

  • Labor Rules Will Unlock IRA Tax Credits' Full Value

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    Companies that make sure to follow the Inflation Reduction Act's unique labor rules will be in the best position to unlock the law's tremendous tax incentives aimed at promoting renewable energy, lowering greenhouse gas emissions and encouraging carbon sequestration, say Nicole Elliott and Timothy Taylor at Holland & Knight.