Wage & Hour

  • May 15, 2024

    Untranslated Arbitral Pact Can Stand In Wage Row, Panel Says

    A California winery's failure to translate an arbitration agreement from English to Spanish doesn't make the pact fraudulent, a state appellate panel ruled, flipping a trial court's decision finding that a group of former cellar workers could keep their wage suit in court.

  • May 15, 2024

    Last-Mile Amazon Driver Does Interstate Work, Panel Says

    A driver for a logistics company who primarily made local deliveries for Amazon was engaged in interstate commerce and thus exempt from mandatory arbitration, a California appeals court has held, saying the worker's wage and hour claims can remain in state court.

  • May 15, 2024

    IT Recruiters Pursue Win Against Staffing Co. In OT Class Suit

    Recruiters for tech staffing company TEKsystems have asked a California federal judge to award them a pretrial win on their claim that the company misclassified them, saying recruiters are entry-level employees, not managers, so they don't qualify for the narrow exemption to California's overtime statute.

  • May 15, 2024

    Chemical Biz's Worker Numbers Can't Keep Wage Suit Federal

    A chemical company failed to show that more than 100 workers would be part of a proposed class in a suit claiming unpaid wages, a Pennsylvania federal judge ruled, sending the suit back to state court.

  • May 15, 2024

    Toss Of Bonus Bias Claim Too Short On Details, 5th Circ. Says

    The Fifth Circuit has reinstated a Hispanic salesman's claim that he was denied $160,000 in bonuses by a construction contractor out of racial bias after he was fired, ruling the lower court didn't adequately explain why it nixed that allegation.

  • May 15, 2024

    FedEx Contractor Wage Deal Needs Work, Judge Rules

    A California federal judge wouldn't sign off on a settlement for more than $33,000 between a FedEx contractor and delivery drivers to partly end a wage suit that named both FedEx and the contractor, telling the parties the terms lacked necessary information.

  • May 14, 2024

    Venable Opens Colo. Office With 8 Sherman & Howard Attys

    Venable LLP is growing its presence by opening its first office in Colorado, with eight commercial and employment attorneys from Sherman & Howard LLP opening its Denver location, which will be headed by partner-in-charge James "Jim" Sawtelle, the firm announced Tuesday.

  • May 14, 2024

    Conn. Retaliation Suit Advances After Justices' Title VII Ruling

    With a recent U.S. Supreme Court opinion said to be illuminating the path forward, a federal judge in Connecticut has declined to dismiss a case by a self-described former "high-level" employee of a private equity firm who alleges she was fired after raising concerns about her employer's treatment of women.

  • May 14, 2024

    Revised $2.25M Walmart OT Deal Fails For Lack Of Changes

    A California federal judge again refused to approve a $2.25 million deal between Walmart and 1,700 workers that would resolve an unpaid overtime lawsuit, finding that the modified agreement did not fix deficiencies the court had previously identified in the settlement's distribution method.

  • May 14, 2024

    Intervenors Can't Convince Appeals Court to Ax PAGA Deal

    A California state appeals court found that a trial court properly evaluated and approved a deal ending a Private Attorneys General Act lawsuit, disagreeing that intervenors were owed input in the case and rejecting the state labor department's assertion that the settlement was a "reverse auction."

  • May 14, 2024

    Domino's Operator Can't Arbitrate Car Reimbursement Suit

    The operator of Domino's Pizza franchise stores can't push into arbitration a driver's suit claiming under-reimbursement, a Tennessee federal judge ruled, saying the operator is not part of an arbitration pact the worker signed.

  • May 14, 2024

    Eli Lilly Can Challenge Collective Cert. Ruling In Age Bias Suit

    An Indiana federal judge said Eli Lilly & Co. can immediately appeal a decision certifying a collective in a suit accusing the pharmaceutical company of favoring millennials over older workers for promotions, agreeing that the Seventh Circuit should clarify the requirements for moving forward collectively.

  • May 14, 2024

    California Pot Worker's Suit Alleges Slurs, Unpaid Overtime

    A former worker for a cannabis cultivator and distributor is suing his former employer in California state court, saying he was fired in retaliation for reporting a work environment rife with racial discrimination.

  • May 14, 2024

    Lyft Driver Urges Justices Not To Review PAGA Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court already made clear that state courts "have the last word" on the arbitration fate of nonindividual Private Attorneys General Act claims, a Lyft driver said, saying there's no need for the justices to weigh in on his misclassification case.

  • May 14, 2024

    DOL Scores Order To Stop Diner From Intimidating Workers

    An Indiana diner must stop retaliating against workers cooperating with a U.S. Department of Labor probe into its pay practices after a federal judge granted the agency's request for an injunction.

  • May 14, 2024

    DoorDash's $664K Misclassification Deal Gets Final Approval

    A California federal judge gave the final sign-off on a $664,000 settlement ending claims that DoorDash misclassified delivery drivers as independent contractors and failed to pay minimum wage, finding the terms to be a fair resolution of the dispute.

  • May 13, 2024

    Driver Asks For Discovery Greenlight After 6th Circ. Ruling

    A driver for a Domino's franchisee told an Ohio federal court his suit claiming under-reimbursement for vehicle-related expenses should proceed normally after the Sixth Circuit weighed in, saying the appellate court's decision doesn't lead to a different way forward.

  • May 13, 2024

    Calif. Hyatt's $725K Wage Deal Scores Final OK

    A California federal judge Monday placed the final stamp of approval on a $725,000 deal resolving over 600 workers' wage claims against Hyatt, finding the terms to be a reasonable resolution, but trimmed the workers' attorney fees award because the case didn't warrant a larger-than-usual award.

  • May 13, 2024

    DOL Says Policy Disagreement Not Enough To Nix H-2A Rule

    The U.S. Department of Labor rejected a group of farms' criticisms of new H-2A agricultural wages as a mere policy disagreement, telling a North Carolina federal court that the rule was appropriately enacted after taking stock of its potential financial effects.

  • May 13, 2024

    NJ Justices Hold Contract Supersedes Real Estate Wage Law

    The contract a real estate agent signed deeming him an independent contractor is enough to resolve his claims of improper wage deductions, the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled Monday, saying that a state three-prong test doesn't need to apply.

  • May 13, 2024

    Popeye's Franchisee, DOL End Probe Interference Suit

    A Popeye's franchisee and one of its managers will end a U.S. Department of Labor suit in Pennsylvania federal court claiming they lied to and threatened department investigators, after a federal judge approved a deal Monday.

  • May 13, 2024

    Ex-Raleigh Cop Wants OT Suit Kept Alive

    An ex-police officer accusing the City of Raleigh, North Carolina, of forcing its officers to accept time off instead of overtime urged a federal court to deny the city's request to toss the suit, saying the city should be held accountable for failing to pay overtime.

  • May 13, 2024

    Workers Want $775K In Atty Fees After Multistate Wage Verdict

    An attorney who secured a six-figure judgment in a multistate wage class action against an Apple-affiliated repair company has asked for more than $775,000 in fees, citing her opponents' "aggressive" litigation tactics and the significant risk she incurred in taking on the case.

  • May 13, 2024

    Uber, Lyft Put Driver Work Fight In Reverse As Trial Begins

    A high-stakes battle over the employment status of drivers for Uber and Lyft kicked off in Massachusetts on Monday, as the companies sought to flip the government allegations by arguing that the ride-hailing giants work for their drivers, not the other way around.

  • May 13, 2024

    Rail Worker Wage Case Won't Get High Court Review

    The U.S. Supreme Court won't intervene in a pending Massachusetts lawsuit against the operator of a freight rail line over whether its employees are covered by the state's Prevailing Wage Act, declining Monday to review the case.

Expert Analysis

  • What OFCCP Enforcement Shift Means For Gov't Contractors

    Author Photo

    With long-awaited directives from the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs showing a shift away from self-imposed constraints on enforcement, contractors should prepare for greater scrutiny, broad records requests and the agency's unsettlingly hostile position on the limits of attorney-client privilege, says Christopher Durham at Duane Morris.

  • Why NLRB Is Unlikely To Succeed In Misclassification Case

    Author Photo

    A recent National Labor Relations Board complaint would make the act of misclassifying workers as independent contractors a labor law violation, and while companies shouldn't expect this to succeed, they may want to take certain steps to better protect themselves from this type of initiative, say Richard Reibstein and Janet Barsky at Locke Lord.

  • 11th Circ. Ban On Service Awards May Inhibit Class Actions

    Author Photo

    Since the Johnson v. NPAS Solutions decision in 2020, the long-established practice of service awards for representative plaintiffs in class actions has fallen under a cloud in the Eleventh Circuit — and while the case remains an outlier, it may make class actions more difficult to bring in that jurisdiction, say William Reiss and Dave Rochelson at Robins Kaplan.

  • 11th Circ. Salt Bae Ruling Provides Service Charge Blueprint

    Author Photo

    The Eleventh Circuit’s recent decision in Compere v. Nusret Miami, holding that a restaurant owned by celebrity chef Salt Bae could use service charges to compensate employees, highlights the benefits of this pay plan over the tip credit, and illustrates six steps for hospitality employers to implement such a policy, say Ted Boehm and Courtney Leyes at Fisher Phillips.

  • How New Bill May Affect Enforcement Of Mass. Wage Laws

    Author Photo

    It would be difficult to overstate the potential impact of Massachusetts' proposed wage law legislation, which would expand liability for wage theft and enhance enforceability of the commonwealth's wage statutes, say attorneys at Seyfarth.

  • Calif. College Athlete Pay Bill May Lead To Employment Issues

    Author Photo

    While California’s College Athlete Race and Gender Equity Act may have a difficult time passing, it could open the door for an argument that players at academic institutions should be deemed employees, and schools must examine and prepare for the potential challenges that could be triggered by compensating college athletes, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Defeating Motions To Decertify FLSA Collective Actions

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    Matthew Helland at Nichols Kaster lays out plaintiff strategies that can help beat a defendant’s motion to decertify a Fair Labor Standards Act collective action and convince the judge that a case should be tried on a groupwide basis, highlighting key issues such as representative proof and varying circuit frameworks.

  • How A New Law Will Affect Ohio Overtime Class Actions

    Author Photo

    Ohio’s recently enacted S.B. 47 — which exempts employers from paying overtime to their employees under certain circumstances and converts state wage and hour class actions to the Fair Labor Standards Act opt-in collective — signals substantive changes for Ohio-based employers and employees, say Adam Primm and Thomas Jackson at Benesch.

  • Don't Be Late Paying Terminated Employees in Massachusetts

    Author Photo

    By imposing strict liability for an incorrect wage payment to a terminated employee, the Massachusetts high court’s recent decision in Reuter v. Methuen upends a long-standing precedent and means employers will lose a commonly used safety net, say attorneys at Day Pitney.

  • DOL's New Retaliation Focus Requires Employer Vigilance

    Author Photo

    In light of the U.S. Department of Labor’s recently issued bulletin signaling a wide-sweeping approach and enforcement posture to even subtle forms of retaliation, employers must ensure they have a solid framework for fair treatment, prompt investigation and appropriate resolution of employee complaints, says Mark Tabakman at Fox Rothschild.

  • To Close Pay Gaps, Laws Must Shift Burden To Employers

    Author Photo

    To address the scourge of gender- and race-based pay gaps, legislators should follow the recent lead of several jurisdictions by requiring companies to advertise salary ranges with job postings and prohibiting reliance on past pay, reversing the information asymmetry that gives employers more bargaining power, say Christine Webber and Rebecca Ojserkis at Cohen Milstein.

  • Bankruptcy Rulings Highlight Split On Excusable Neglect

    Author Photo

    The Fifth Circuit's recent decision in CJ Holding, and a New York federal bankruptcy court's recent decision in Westinghouse, contribute to a growing split on the weight assigned to various factors when courts decide what may constitute excusable neglect in bankruptcy filing, say attorneys at Cullen Dykman.

  • Avoiding Surprise Taxation Of Employment Settlements

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    Sandra Cohen at Cohen & Buckmann discusses how to avoid unwelcome tax-related payments in connection with settling an employment claim, as the extra cost can significantly decrease the perceived value of an offer and push the parties further apart.