Wage & Hour

  • April 18, 2024

    NY Appeals Court Revives AI Firm CLO's Claim For Pay

    In a significant ruling for executives and professionals, a New York state appeals court has reversed the dismissal of key claims in a former chief legal officer's lawsuit alleging he wasn't paid all wages owed after his employment ended at artificial intelligence company Amelia US LLC.

  • April 18, 2024

    Saladworks Operator Misclassified Asst. Managers, Suit Says

    A Pennsylvania-based franchisee of fast-casual salad eatery Saladworks misclassified its assistant managers as overtime-exempt even though they should have earned time-and-a-half wages for overtime hours, a former manager alleged in a proposed collective action filed in federal court Thursday.

  • April 18, 2024

    Buffalo Wild Wings Owes Pay For OT Work, Server Says

    Buffalo Wild Wings has not been paying its hourly employees overtime wages for time they spent working off the clock and didn't reimburse them for business expenses or allow them to take breaks, a server alleged in a proposed class action filed in California federal court.

  • April 18, 2024

    US Chamber, Groups Seek Win In DOL Contractor Rule Spat

    The U.S. Department of Labor acted illegally when it nixed a Trump-era rule determining workers' independent contractor status and issued a new rule, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and a slew of trade groups told a Texas federal court.

  • April 17, 2024

    Colo. Labor Dept. Says Amazon's Holiday Pay Must Be In OT

    The Colorado Department of Labor and Employment told the state Supreme Court that Amazon's holiday incentive pay is similar to shift differentials, backing warehouse workers' arguments that the pay should have been included in their overtime compensation.

  • April 17, 2024

    Drivers, Transport Cos.' $700K Wage Deal Nabs Initial OK

    A California federal judge placed the initial stamp of approval on a revised $700,000 settlement between a class of truck drivers, an agricultural product transportation company and labor contractor ending a wage lawsuit, saying the updated deal is an adequate resolution.

  • April 17, 2024

    Yacht Repair Co.'s Late Arguments Can't Save It From OT Suit

    A yacht repair company owes more than $55,000 in overtime and damages to a former employee, a Florida federal judge ruled, rejecting the company's Hail Mary argument that the worker was exempt from overtime under the Fair Labor Standards Act.

  • April 17, 2024

    Airplane Servicers Nod to Justices, Reiterate That Fueling Isn't Interstate Work

    Two companies that service airplanes alerted the Ninth Circuit to the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision regarding the applicability of a worker exemption from the Federal Arbitration Act, saying the high court's ruling supports their contention that fuel pumping is not interstate work that would trigger the carveout.

  • April 17, 2024

    NJ Landscaping Co. Pays $255K For OT Violations

    A New Jersey landscaping company paid nearly $255,000 in back wages and damages for denying 20 workers their overtime wages, the U.S. Department of Labor announced.

  • April 17, 2024

    NLRB Says Co. Violated Labor Law With Wage Suit Questions

    A chemical manufacturer illegally questioned an employee about his conversations with co-workers and union stewards linked to a wage and hour lawsuit, the National Labor Relations Board concluded, upholding an agency judge's decision about the workers' confidentiality interests.

  • April 17, 2024

    Ogletree Expands Into Western NY With Ex-Goldberg Atty

    Management-side employment firm Ogletree Deakins is expanding into western New York, announcing Tuesday that it is adding a shareholder in Buffalo from Goldberg Segalla.

  • April 17, 2024

    Bright Line On Arbitration Seen As Risk To Workers' Rights

    A Ninth Circuit ruling that companies cannot qualify for a federal arbitration exemption is a surprising bright line that may curtail workers' wage rights in the future, experts say.

  • April 17, 2024

    Discovery In $500M Severance Fight Against X, Musk Will Wait

    A California federal judge paused discovery in a suit claiming X, formerly Twitter, owes $500 million in severance to the workers the company laid off after Elon Musk's takeover, saying the court should wait to sort out the company's dismissal bid.

  • April 17, 2024

    Military IT Contractor Didn't Pay OT, Ex-Worker Says

    A Virginia-based technology company that contracts with the U.S. military has not been paying its hourly employees time-and-a-half overtime premiums even though they regularly work more than 60 hours a week, according to a proposed class action filed in federal court.

  • April 16, 2024

    Virtual Cashiers Can Help Cut Wage Costs But Risk Liability

    Virtual cashiers from overseas who are appearing on screens in a handful of New York-area restaurants can help employers reduce labor costs, but attorneys warn that the practice could lead to issues such as wage claims by in-store workers. Here, Law360 explores the issue.

  • April 16, 2024

    6th Circ. Won't Rehear White Ex-Kroger Manager's Bias Case

    A former manager for Kroger will not get to argue his claims he was fired because he is a white man before the full Sixth Circuit, according to a new order, letting stand the appellate court's decision to dismiss the former manager's claims.

  • April 16, 2024

    Pot Transport Co. Can't Escape Overtime Suit

    A company specializing in secure transport of marijuana products didn't show that its drivers engage in interstate commerce and therefore can't escape a driver's misclassification suit seeking unpaid overtime, a Michigan federal judge has ruled.

  • April 16, 2024

    DoorDash, Fla. Driver Settle Classification Suit In Arbitration

    A DoorDash driver and the app-based food delivery service resolved in arbitration a suit originally filed in Florida federal court alleging the company misclassified workers as independent contractors, according to court papers.

  • April 16, 2024

    Construction Subcontractor Fined $34K After DOL Probe

    A federal construction subcontractor working on apartments in Washington, D.C., was fined more than $34,000 for misclassifying nine workers, the U.S. Department of Labor announced.

  • April 16, 2024

    Arbitration Pacts Leave Domino's Wage Suit Plaintiff-Less

    An expense reimbursement dispute against Domino's can't go forward because it will be without a named plaintiff, as the four drivers who were supposed to step in are all bound by arbitration agreements, a Michigan federal judge ruled Tuesday.

  • April 15, 2024

    Drivers Can't Avoid Uber's 'Road Not Taken' Position

    A Pennsylvania federal judge has ruled that the luxury car drivers who accused Uber Technologies Inc. of misclassifying them as independent contractors must respond to the company's renewed post-trial win bid, rejecting the drivers' argument that it was too long and filed too late.

  • April 15, 2024

    Jury Sides With Ala. City Education Board In Pay Bias Suit

    An Alabama federal jury rejected a former athletic director's gender bias suit alleging she was paid less than male colleagues and demoted by an Alabama school board, four months after the case was revived by the Eleventh Circuit.

  • April 15, 2024

    Versace Mansion Workers Lose Bid To Revive Wage Claims

    Workers at the former Versace Mansion can't revive their minimum wage claims because a service fee charge is not a discretionary tip and was lawfully used to top off the workers' base hourly pay, the Eleventh Circuit said Monday.

  • April 15, 2024

    Arbitration Carveout's Scope To Turn On Where Line Is Drawn

    Following the U.S. Supreme Court's decision that a worker's job duties are key for determining whether someone is exempt from federal arbitration law, the fight will turn to where lower courts draw the line for how much transportation work is enough to get the carveout, attorneys told Law360.

  • April 15, 2024

    Pharmacy, Courier Co. Settle Driver's Classification Suit

    A delivery driver and a CVS-owned pharmacy and a logistics and courier firm told an Illinois federal court that they have reached a settlement resolving claims that the company misclassified workers as independent contractors and paid them neither minimum nor overtime premium wages. 

Expert Analysis

  • PAGA Turns 20: An Employer Road Map For Managing Claims

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    As California’s Private Attorneys General Act turns 20, the arbitrability of individual and representative claims remains relatively unsettled — but employers can potentially avoid litigation involving both types of claims by following guidance from the California Supreme Court’s Adolph v. Uber ruling, say attorneys at Mintz.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Insights On Noncompetes From 'The Office'

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    Troutman Pepper’s Tracey Diamond, Evan Gibbs, Constance Brewster and Jim Earle compare scenarios from “The Office” to the complex world of noncompetes and associated tax issues, as employers are becoming increasingly hesitant to look to noncompete provisions amid a potential federal ban.

  • 3 Compliance Reminders For Calif. Employers In 2024

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    As we enter into the new year, several recent updates to California employment law — including minimum wage and sick leave requirements — necessitate immediate compliance actions for employers, says Daniel Pyne at Hopkins & Carley.

  • Compliance Refresher Amid DOL Child Labor Crackdown

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    In light of the Labor Department’s recent announcement of new penalty assessment procedures for child labor law violations, Erica MacDonald and Sylvia Bokyung St. Clair at Faegre Drinker discuss what employers should know about the department’s continued focus on this issue and how to bolster compliance efforts.

  • Top 10 Employer Resolutions For 2024

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    From technological leaps to sea changes in labor policy to literal sea changes, 2024 provides opportunities for employers to face big-picture questions that will shape their business for years to come, say Allegra Lawrence-Hardy and Lisa Haldar at Lawrence & Bundy.

  • Top 10 Whistleblowing And Retaliation Events Of 2023

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and federal and state courts made 2023 another groundbreaking year for whistleblower litigation and retaliation developments, including the SEC’s massive whistleblower awards, which are likely to continue into 2024 and further incentivize individuals to submit tips, say attorneys at Proskauer.

  • Navigating Issues Around NY Freelancer Pay Protection Bill

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    New York’s recently signed Freelance Isn’t Free Act was designed to protect freelance workers, but leaves business to navigate challenges such as unclear coverage, vague contract terms and potentially crushing penalties, says Richard Reibstein at Locke Lord.

  • The Key To Defending Multistate Collective FLSA Claims

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    Federal circuit courts are split on the reach of a court's jurisdiction over out-of-state employers in Fair Labor Standards Act collective actions, but until the U.S. Supreme Court agrees to review the question, multistate employers should be aware of a potential case-changing defense, say Matthew Disbrow and Michael Dauphinais at Honigman.

  • Ill. Temp Labor Rules: No Clear Road Map For Compliance

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    While the delay of a particularly thorny provision of the Illinois temporary worker law will provide some short-term relief, staffing agencies and their clients will still need to scramble to plan compliance with the myriad vague requirements imposed by the other amendments to the act, say Alexis Dominguez and Alissa Griffin at Neal Gerber.

  • Tips For Defeating Claims Of Willful FLSA Violations

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    As employers increasingly encounter wage and hour complaints under the Fair Labor Standards Act, more companies could face enhanced penalties for violations deemed willful, but defense counsel can use several discovery and trial strategies to instead demonstrate the employer’s commitment to compliance, say Michael Mueller and Evangeline Paschal at Hunton.

  • A Gov't Contractor's Guide To Davis-Bacon Prevailing Wages

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    In light of shifting federal infrastructure priorities and recent updates to U.S. Department of Labor regulations, employers should take the time to revisit the basics of prevailing wage requirements for federal contractors under the Davis-Bacon Act and similar laws, says Timothy Taylor at Holland & Knight.

  • Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • 1st Circ. Ruling Helps Clarify Test For FLSA Admin Exemption

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    The First Circuit’s recent decision in Marcus v. American Contract Bridge League will help employers navigate the Fair Labor Standards Act's "general business operations" exemption and make the crucial and often confusing decision of whether white collar employees are overtime-exempt administrators or nonexempt frontline producers of products and services, says Mark Tabakman at Fox Rothschild.