Wage & Hour

  • April 15, 2024

    Calif. Trucking Groups To Fight AB 5 Ruling At 9th Circ.

    A pair of California trucking industry groups and two drivers signaled they want the Ninth Circuit to undo a lower court's rejection of their challenge to the state's independent contractor classification law, known as A.B. 5.

  • April 12, 2024

    Wash. Hospital Workers Say Class Suits Are Mirror Images

    A group of healthcare workers urged a Washington state judge to find that their employer has violated the same wage laws that an affiliated hospital system was recently found liable for in a parallel case, contending at a Friday hearing that the two class actions ultimately target the same parent company.

  • April 12, 2024

    Jackson Lewis Hires Employment Litigator In Baltimore

    Employer-side firm Jackson Lewis PC has added a former U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission litigator to its Baltimore office who says her experience with the federal bias watchdog gives her a comprehensive view on how to advise clients.

  • April 12, 2024

    Ex-Luxury Brand Workers Request Class Cert. In OT Suit

    Retail workers for the high-end fashion brand Comme Des Garçons asked a New York federal judge to grant them nationwide collective certification in a lawsuit alleging the company misclassified them as managers and failed to pay them overtime wages, saying their job duties and compensation methods are the same.

  • April 12, 2024

    Journalists Say WARN Act Claims Perfect For Class Cert.

    Workers for the now-shuttered digital media startup The Messenger urged a New York federal judge Friday to certify a class of hundreds of staffers who were terminated with no advance notice in violation of the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act, saying the law is suited for class wide proceedings.

  • April 12, 2024

    Online Pharmacy Wants Out Of Courier's Misclassification Suit

    An online pharmacy asked a Massachusetts federal judge Friday to toss claims against it in a delivery worker's independent contractor misclassification lawsuit against the pharmacy and its delivery provider, saying the delivery company is the worker's sole employer.

  • April 12, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Twitter Wants Age Bias Suit Tossed

    In the coming week, attorneys should keep an eye out for the potential dismissal of a proposed age discrimination class and collective action against Twitter Inc. and its successor, X Corp. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters on deck in California.

  • April 12, 2024

    NY Forecast: 2nd Circ. Hears Tech Co. Retaliation Suit

    This week, the Second Circuit will consider a former marketing manager's lawsuit claiming that the head of the technology company where she worked sexually harassed her and that she was fired after she refused his advances. Here, Law360 explores this and other cases on the docket in New York.

  • April 12, 2024

    SC Home Care Co. Pays $37K For Misclassifying Workers

    A South Carolina home healthcare company paid more than $37,000 after it misclassified 35 workers, the U.S. Department of Labor announced.

  • April 12, 2024

    High Court Keeps Arbitration Exemption's Focus On Workers

    The U.S. Supreme Court held Friday that distributors who delivered Tastykake, Wonder bread and other baked goods to retailers may qualify for an exemption from the Federal Arbitration Act that could let them keep their wage-and-hour suit in court.

  • April 11, 2024

    Chipotle Pays $2.9M To End Seattle Wage Violation Probe

    Fast-food chain Chipotle has agreed to pay nearly $2.9 million to more than 1,800 workers at eight of its restaurants in Seattle to resolve the city's investigation into employees' allegations that the employer violated local ordinances governing sick pay and scheduling, a city labor agency announced Thursday.

  • April 11, 2024

    City Council Pushes Minneapolis Ride-Share Ordinance Date

    The Minneapolis City Council unanimously agreed Thursday to postpone to July 1 the effective date of an ordinance setting up ride-share drivers' minimum wages, temporarily avoiding a Lyft and Uber exodus from the city.

  • April 11, 2024

    Supermarket Chain Settles Fired Manager's Sex Bias Suit

    A supermarket chain will pay a former store manager $25,000 to shutter her New York federal court suit claiming she was paid less than her male counterparts, and she was fired after complaining that her male supervisor favored those male colleagues, according to a Thursday filing.

  • April 11, 2024

    Ex-Geico Agents Ask 6th Circ. To Revive Classification Suit

    A group of former Geico agents asked the Sixth Circuit to revive their claims that they were misclassified and denied benefits, challenging the accuracy and relevance of plan documents that the lower court reviewed when dismissing the workers' suit.

  • April 11, 2024

    Ariz. Contractor Owes $890K For Wage, Child Labor Violations

    An Arizona construction contractor specializing in painting will pay $890,000 to settle a U.S. Department of Labor suit accusing it of denying overtime rates and running afoul of child labor laws and recordkeeping requirements, according to papers filed Thursday in Arizona federal court.

  • April 11, 2024

    Tech Co. To Pay Ex-Worker $7K To End Anxiety Firing Suit

    A computer and cellphone accessory manufacturer will pay nearly $7,000 to end a former worker's suit alleging unpaid overtime as well as a failure to accommodate her extreme anxiety, a Georgia federal judge ordered Thursday, approving the deal.

  • April 11, 2024

    DOL's Final OT Rule Incoming After Clearing OMB Review

    The U.S. Department of Labor might soon issue a final rule increasing salaries in order for workers to be considered overtime-exempt under the Fair Labor Standards Act, after a proposed rule cleared the White House's Office of Management and Budget.

  • April 11, 2024

    Victoria's Secret Says Settlement Bars COVID Screening Suit

    Victoria's Secret Stores has asked a California federal judge to grant it a win in a lawsuit alleging it should have paid employees for the time they spent in pre-shift COVID-19 screenings during the pandemic, saying the claims are barred by a settlement in an identical lawsuit.

  • April 11, 2024

    Urgent Care Flouts OT And Min. Wage Laws, Workers Say

    An urgent care company that New York City tapped to provide services at migrant facilities failed to compensate workers on time while also owing them weeks of pay, two former employees said in a proposed class and collective action in New York federal court.

  • April 11, 2024

    Attys Puzzled By Judge's Refusal To Hear Hybrid Wage Case

    Wage-and-hour cases brought by workers on a group basis under both federal and state law have become so routine in federal courts that attorneys told Law360 they're puzzled by a Michigan federal judge's refusal last week to let such a suit proceed.

  • April 11, 2024

    Univ. Of Tenn. Hospital Stiffs Flight Nurses On OT, Court Told

    The University of Tennessee Medical Center did not pay flight nurses and paramedics overtime wages when they worked over 40 hours a week and deducted meal breaks that they were still on duty during, a former flight nurse alleged in a proposed collective action in federal court.

  • April 10, 2024

    Wash. Healthcare Workers Owed $100M In Wages, Jury Told

    Counsel for two classes encompassing more than 30,000 current and former healthcare workers told a Washington state jury on Wednesday that Providence Health & Services should pay nearly $100 million in damages for using an illegal time clock rounding method that shortchanged employees and failing to provide required meal breaks.

  • April 10, 2024

    Fed. Supremacy Stance Seen As Weak In Detainee Wage Row

    The U.S. Department of Justice's argument for federal supremacy as grounds to deny immigrant detainees minimum wage in the workers' fray with detention operator GEO Group doesn't hold up to scrutiny, attorneys say, in a case that has helped shine a light on employee rights for those behind bars.

  • April 10, 2024

    Drivers Seek Nix Of Uber's Motion After 'Road Not Taken' Brief

    UberBlack drivers urged a Pennsylvania federal judge not to require them to respond to Uber Technologies Inc.'s additional filing in an independent contractor dispute after the company already submitted a brief invoking Robert Frost's poem "The Road Not Taken," saying Uber defied an order setting page limits.

  • April 10, 2024

    Ex-Ruth's Chris Server Loses Discovery Bid In Wage Suit

    An Ohio federal judge ruled additional discovery is not necessary for a runner and server's unpaid wages suit, saying the former Ruth's Chris worker is trying to get a second bite at the apple for documents he was already unsuccessful in getting.

Expert Analysis

  • 3 Employer Strategies To Streamline Mass Arbitrations

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    Workers under arbitration agreements have gained an edge on their employers by filing floods of tedious and expensive individualized claims, but companies can adapt to this new world of mass arbitration by applying several new strategies that may streamline the dispute-resolution process, says Michael Strauss at Alternative Resolution Centers.

  • Employer Takeaways From 2nd Circ. Equal Pay Ruling

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    The Second Circuit 's recent decision in Eisenhauer v. Culinary Institute of America reversed a long-held understanding of the Equal Pay Act, ultimately making it easier for employers to defend against equal pay claims brought under federal law, but it is not a clear escape hatch for employers, say Thelma Akpan and Katelyn McCombs at Littler.

  • The Growing Need For FLSA Private Settlement Rule Clarity

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    A Pennsylvania district court's recent ruling in Walker v. Marathon Petroleum echoes an interesting and growing trend of jurists questioning the need for — and legality of — judicial approval of private Fair Labor Standards Act settlements, which provides more options for parties to efficiently resolve their claims, says Rachael Coe at Moore & Van Allen.

  • High Court Bakery Driver Case Could Limit Worker Arbitration

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    Employers that require arbitration of worker claims under the Federal Arbitration Act should closely follow Bissonnette v. LePage Bakeries as it goes before the U.S. Supreme Court, which could thoroughly expand the definition of “transportation workers” who are exempt from compulsory arbitration and force companies to field more employee disputes in court, says Nick Morisani at Phelps Dunbar.

  • In Focus At The EEOC: Advancing Equal Pay

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    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s recently finalized strategic enforcement plan expresses a renewed commitment to advancing equal pay at a time when employees have unprecedented access to compensation information, highlighting for employers the importance of open communication and ongoing pay equity analyses, say Paul Evans at Baker McKenzie and Christine Hendrickson at Syndio.

  • Return Days Key In Hyatt COVID-19 Layoffs Ruling

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    The Ninth Circuit’s recent decision in Hartstein v. Hyatt, which clarified when the hotel giant had to pay out accrued vacation time after pandemic-prompted temporary layoffs, highlights the importance of whether an employer specifies a return date within the normal pay period, say attorneys at ArentFox Schiff.

  • How ESG Is Taking Women's Soccer To The Next Level

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    Several elite soccer teams sharpened their competitive edges for the 2023 Women's World Cup by focusing on environmental, social and governance issues at home, demonstrating that many industries can use the principles of ESG investing to identify opportunities to increase growth, improve performance and address stakeholders' desires, say attorneys at ArentFox Schiff.

  • How Int'l Strategies Can Mitigate US Child Labor Risks

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    Recent reports of child labor in the U.S. raise significant compliance concerns under state and federal child labor laws, but international business and human rights principles provide tools companies can use to identify, mitigate and remediate the risks, says Tom Plotkin at Covington.

  • 2nd Circ. OT Ruling Guides On Pay For Off-The-Clock Work

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    While the Second Circuit’s recent holding in Perry v. City of New York reiterated that the Fair Labor Standards Act obligates employers to pay overtime for off-the-clock work, it recognized circumstances, such as an employee’s failure to report, that allow an employer to disclaim the knowledge element that triggers this obligation, say Robert Whitman and Kyle Winnick at Seyfarth.

  • FLSA Ruling Highlights Time Compensability Under State Law

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    While the Third Circuit's August decision in Tyger v. Precision Drilling endorsed the prevailing standard among federal courts regarding time compensability under the Fair Labor Standards Act, it also serves as a reminder that state laws will often find a broader range of activities to be compensable, say Ryan Warden and Craig Long at White and Williams.

  • Understanding Wage Theft Penalties Under New NY Statute

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    Under a recently enacted New York statute, wage theft is considered a form of larceny under the state's penal law, and prosecutors can seek even stronger penalties against violators — so all employers are well advised to pay close and careful attention to compliance with their wage payment obligations, say Paxton Moore and Robert Whitman at Seyfarth.

  • How To Create A California-Compliant Piece-Rate Pay Policy

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    Piece-rate compensation can encourage worker efficiency and productivity, but California has special rules for employers that use this type of pay plan, so careful execution and clear communication with employees is essential for maintaining compliance, says Ashley Paynter at Riley Safer.

  • 3 Employer Considerations In Light Of DOL Proposed OT Rule

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    A recently unveiled rule from the U.S. Department of Labor would increase the salary threshold for Fair Labor Standards Act overtime exemptions, and while the planned changes are not the law just yet, employers should start thinking about the best ways to position their organizations for compliance in the future, say Brodie Erwin and Sarah Spangenburg at Kilpatrick.