Employment

  • April 11, 2024

    Ex-COO Sues NJ Law Firm, Claiming Sexual Harassment

    The former chief operating officer of New Jersey personal injury giant Garces Grabler & LeBrocq PC sued the firm Wednesday for sexual harassment and discrimination, alleging firm leaders unfairly impeded her from doing her job and made lewd comments about her.

  • April 11, 2024

    1st Challenge To NLRB Structure Axed For Lack Of Standing

    A Washington, D.C., federal judge tossed a constitutional challenge to the National Labor Relations Board's structure filed by two Starbucks employees, ruling that the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation-represented baristas did not have standing to sue.

  • April 11, 2024

    Ex-NFL Players Near Settlement In Race-Norming Benefits Suit

    Two former players whose lawsuit accuses the NFL's disability benefit plans of awarding them lower benefits because they are Black told a Maryland federal court they have had "productive" meetings with the defendants and are near a settlement proposal.

  • April 11, 2024

    DOL's Final OT Rule Incoming After Clearing OMB Review

    The U.S. Department of Labor might soon issue a final rule increasing salaries in order for workers to be considered overtime-exempt under the Fair Labor Standards Act, after a proposed rule cleared the White House's Office of Management and Budget.

  • April 11, 2024

    Mich. Justices To Hear Ex-Prosecutor's Whistleblower Appeal

    The Michigan Supreme Court agreed Wednesday to hold oral arguments in the appeal of a former assistant county prosecutor who claims her former boss retaliated against her for speaking up about a plea bargain she believed was unlawful.

  • April 11, 2024

    Medtronic Can't Ditch Ex-Sales Rep's Retaliation Claim

    Medical device maker Medtronic can't avoid a whistleblower retaliation claim by a former sales rep who says he was pushed out after reporting what he suspected to be a kickback scheme to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, a federal judge said Wednesday.

  • April 11, 2024

    Ex-Ellenoff Grossman Atty Faces Possible Firing Suit Remand

    A former Ellenoff Grossman & Schole LLP associate's suit saying she was fired for protesting sexual harassment should return to state court, a New York federal judge recommended, saying the federal court can't enforce arbitration pacts invalidated by a 2022 amendment to the Federal Arbitration Act.

  • April 11, 2024

    United Airlines Defeats Religious Bias Suit Over Vax Mandate

    United Airlines workers failed to furnish "basic factual details" to back up their case alleging the airline discriminated against employees for their religious beliefs by requiring a COVID-19 vaccination, an Illinois federal judge said, tossing the suit.

  • April 11, 2024

    6th Circ. Orders Redo In Brokerage's Trade Secrets Row

    The Sixth Circuit ordered an Ohio district court to take another look at its ruling that a team of insurance brokerage's workers who defected for a competitor must comply with non-compete terms, reasoning that the lower court referenced standards for the injunction, but didn't actually consider them. 

  • April 11, 2024

    Apple Must Face Former Executive's Trimmed Age Bias Suit

    A California federal judge narrowed a former Apple executive's suit alleging his age led the company to withhold bonuses, though the suit stands, as the judge said it sufficiently showed a contract was breached when the company did not pay a hefty stock retention bonus.

  • April 10, 2024

    Wash. Healthcare Workers Owed $100M In Wages, Jury Told

    Counsel for two classes encompassing more than 30,000 current and former healthcare workers told a Washington state jury on Wednesday that Providence Health & Services should pay nearly $100 million in damages for using an illegal time clock rounding method that shortchanged employees and failing to provide required meal breaks.

  • April 10, 2024

    No Retrial Over NC Farm Worker's $2.5M Severed Foot Verdict

    A North Carolina farm failed in its bid for a new trial following a $2.5 million verdict against it, a federal judge ruled Wednesday, as a worker who lost his foot to a grain silo auger had enough evidence to support the award.

  • April 10, 2024

    Smaller May Be Better For NCAA, Sports Antitrust Experts Say

    Sports law experts at the American Bar Association's spring antitrust meeting said Wednesday that for top-level college sports to survive the wave of antitrust litigation that it faces, colleges and universities may need to think small.

  • April 10, 2024

    US, Mexico Resolve Labor Complaints At Two Mexico Plants

    Workers at two Mexico automotive part facilities can now organize under a union of their choice after concerns of labor violations were resolved through the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement's labor rights tool, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative announced.

  • April 10, 2024

    Senate Disapproves Of NLRB Joint Employer Rule

    A resolution to block an enjoined National Labor Relations Board rule treating more employers as joint employers is headed to President Joe Biden's desk following a close U.S. Senate vote Wednesday, though the president has pledged not to sign.

  • April 10, 2024

    Disney Defends Right To Fire 'Star Wars' Actor Over X Posts

    The Walt Disney Co. and Lucasfilm Ltd. asked a California federal judge to toss Gina Carano's claims that she was unlawfully fired from "The Mandalorian" for her social media posts, arguing they have a constitutional right as artistic creators to decide which actors to employ to express their artistic messages.

  • April 10, 2024

    Drivers Seek Nix Of Uber's Motion After 'Road Not Taken' Brief

    UberBlack drivers urged a Pennsylvania federal judge not to require them to respond to Uber Technologies Inc.'s additional filing in an independent contractor dispute after the company already submitted a brief invoking Robert Frost's poem "The Road Not Taken," saying Uber defied an order setting page limits.

  • April 10, 2024

    3rd Circ. Skeptical Of Challenge To NLRB Bonuses Ruling

    A Third Circuit panel appeared skeptical Wednesday of a nursing home's challenge to a National Labor Relations Board decision finding it unlawfully altered bonus pay it issued during the pandemic without bargaining, as judges questioned the company's argument that the bonuses were allowable under an expired contract.

  • April 10, 2024

    Wells Fargo Can't Bar Atty From Deposition, NC Judge Rules

    Wells Fargo lost its bid to stop the lawyer of a fired investment director, who is accusing the bank of disability discrimination, from questioning his former supervisor, with a North Carolina federal judge saying the bank fell short of showing that the attorney's previous representation of the supervisor was related in any way to the current action.

  • April 10, 2024

    Novant Wants Fired Exec's Atty Fees Cut After Trip To 4th Circ.

    An attorney representing a former Novant Health executive should receive about $140,000 after prevailing on claims that his client was fired for being white amid a diversity push, the healthcare network said, urging a North Carolina federal judge to reduce the ex-executive's request for about $152,000 in attorney fees.

  • April 10, 2024

    CFTC Names New Watchdog After Whistleblower Allegations

    The Commodity Futures Trading Commission announced Wednesday that it has appointed the Federal Election Commission's inspector general to head its own independent watchdog office, following allegations his CFTC predecessor failed to protect whistleblowers within the agency.

  • April 10, 2024

    Cleaning Co. To Pay $400K In H-2B Workers' Exploitation Suit

    Mexican guest workers and a cleaning company that recruited them to work at a Colorado luxury hotel asked a federal judge on Wednesday to grant initial approval of a $400,000 settlement on claims that the company committed myriad wage and visa law violations and threatened to deport workers who complained.

  • April 10, 2024

    3rd Circ. Revives Retaliation Suit Against Pa. House GOP

    The Third Circuit breathed new life Wednesday into a former district office manager's lawsuit alleging she was fired by the Pennsylvania House Republican Caucus for reporting she had discovered mold in a state representative's office, finding she was acting outside her job duties when she spoke up.

  • April 10, 2024

    Union Pacific Can't Duck Biometric Privacy Lawsuit

    An Illinois federal judge on Wednesday again refused to dismiss a third amended complaint claiming that Union Pacific violated the state's biometric privacy law when it collected truck drivers' fingerprints without their informed consent, rejecting several new arguments raised by the railroad in its bid to ditch the suit.

  • April 10, 2024

    9th Circ. Doubts Calif.'s Standing In DOL Union Transit Fight

    The Ninth Circuit appeared open Wednesday to restoring the U.S. Department of Labor's power to deny California transit funding because of a perceived conflict between state pension law and bargaining rights, focusing on the state's standing in a dispute that began between the DOL and a union.

Expert Analysis

  • AI In Performance Management: Mitigating Employer Risk

    Author Photo

    Companies are increasingly turning to artificial intelligence tools in performance management, exposing organizations to significant risks, which they can manage through employee training, bias assessments, and comprehensive policies and procedures related to the new technology, say Gregory Brown and Cindy Huang at Jackson Lewis.

  • Series

    Riding My Peloton Bike Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Using the Peloton platform for cycling, running, rowing and more taught me that fostering a mind-body connection will not only benefit you physically and emotionally, but also inspire stamina, focus, discipline and empathy in your legal career, says Christopher Ward at Polsinelli.

  • What To Watch As Justices Consider Appeal Deadline Case

    Author Photo

    Next week, in Harrow v. U.S. Department of Defense, the U.S. Supreme Court will consider for the first time whether a statutory deadline for appealing from a federal agency to an Article III court is jurisdictional, setting the stage for a decision that could dramatically reshape the landscape for challenging agency decisions, say attorneys at MoloLamken.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: March Lessons

    Author Photo

    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses four notable circuit court decisions on topics from consumer fraud to employment — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including coercive communications with putative class members and Article III standing at the class certification stage.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

    Author Photo

    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • What The NIL Negotiation Rules Injunction Means For NCAA

    Author Photo

    A Tennessee federal court's recent preliminary injunction reverses several prominent and well-established NCAA rules on negotiations with student-athletes over name, image and likeness compensation and shows that collegiate athletics is a profoundly unsettled legal environment, say attorneys at Pillsbury.

  • What 2 Years Of Ukraine-Russia Conflict Can Teach Cos.

    Author Photo

    A few key legal lessons for the global business community since Russia's invasion of Ukraine could help protect global commerce in times of future conflict, including how to respond to disparate trade restrictions and sanctions, navigate war-related contract disputes, and protect against heightened cybersecurity risks, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • EEOC Case Reminds That Men Can Also Claim Pay Bias

    Author Photo

    The Maryland State Highway Administration recently settled U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission claims that a male employee was paid less than his female colleagues, highlighting why employers should not focus on a particular protected class when it comes to assessing pay bias risk, say Barbara Grandjean and Audrey Merkel at Husch Blackwell.

  • 3 Litigation Strategies To Combat 'Safetyism'

    Author Photo

    Amid the rise of safetyism — the idea that every person should be free from the risk of harm or discomfort — among jurors and even judges, defense counsel can mount several tactics from the very start of litigation to counteract these views and blunt the potential for jackpot damages, says Ann Marie Duffy at Hollingsworth.

  • Takeaways From NLRB Advice On 'Outside' Employment

    Author Photo

    Rebecca Leaf at Miles & Stockbridge examines a recent memo from the National Labor Relations Board’s Division of Advice that said it’s unlawful for employers to restrict secondary or outside employment, and explains what companies should know about the use of certain restrictive covenants going forward.

  • What Recent Study Shows About AI's Promise For Legal Tasks

    Author Photo

    Amid both skepticism and excitement about the promise of generative artificial intelligence in legal contexts, the first randomized controlled trial studying its impact on basic lawyering tasks shows mixed but promising results, and underscores the need for attorneys to proactively engage with AI, says Daniel Schwarcz at University of Minnesota Law School.

  • Shaping Speech Policies After NLRB's BLM Protest Ruling

    Author Photo

    After the National Labor Relations Board decided last month that a Home Depot employee was protected by federal labor law when they wore a Black Lives Matter slogan on their apron, employers should consider four questions in order to mitigate legal risks associated with workplace political speech policies, say Louis Cannon and Cassandra Horton at Baker Donelson.

  • What To Know About Employee Retention Credit Disclosures

    Author Photo

    Employers that filed potentially erroneous employee retention credit claims should take certain steps to determine whether the IRS’ voluntary disclosure program is a good fit and, if so, prepare a strong application before the window closes on March 22, say attorneys at Dentons.

  • 2026 World Cup: Companies Face Labor Challenges And More

    Author Photo

    Companies sponsoring or otherwise involved with the 2026 FIFA World Cup — hosted jointly by the U.S., Canada and Mexico — should be proactive in preparing to navigate many legal considerations in immigration, labor management and multijurisdictional workforces surrounding the event, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • 5 Things Trial Attorneys Can Learn From Good Teachers

    Author Photo

    Jennifer Cuculich at IMS Legal Strategies recounts lessons she learned during her time as a math teacher that can help trial attorneys connect with jurors, from the importance of framing core issues to the incorporation of different learning styles.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Employment archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!