Employment

  • April 05, 2024

    Texas Univ. Coach Says Sexual Orientation Led To Firing

    A University of Texas at Rio Grande Valley assistant tennis coach has accused the school in federal court of letting her go after a "sham investigation" because she is gay.

  • April 05, 2024

    Neb. Beef Seller Says No Proof It Joined Wage-Fixing Scheme

    A Colorado federal judge gave a Nebraska beef wholesaler another chance to petition for dismissal from a class action accusing it of participating in a meat industry wage-fixing scheme, after the company filed a motion that didn't follow the court's page limit.

  • April 05, 2024

    Tesla Workers Skipped Breaks To Meet Quotas, Suit Says

    Two former warehouse workers hit Tesla with a proposed wage and hour class action Thursday in California federal court, alleging the electric carmaker violated labor laws by not providing sufficient break time, operating an illegal quota system and failing to pay all of their wages.

  • April 05, 2024

    Starbucks Tells Judge Union Dealings Aren't 'Mission Critical'

    Starbucks denied Friday that complying with federal labor law was "mission critical" to its business as it urged a Washington state judge to dismiss a shareholder suit accusing company leaders of union busting, which they say tanked Starbucks' reputation.

  • April 05, 2024

    NBC, Bravo Accused Of Racism By 'Vanderpump Rules' Alum

    "Vanderpump Rules" alumnus Faith Stowers sued NBC, Evolution Media and Bravo for discrimination and retaliation in California state court Friday, alleging she was threatened with legal action when she tried to speak up about the ill-treatment she suffered during taping, including racist slurs and having a knife brandished at her.

  • April 05, 2024

    Texas Appeals Court Reverses IT Consulting Worker Spat

    A Texas appeals court revived a suit brought by an information technology consulting company against its former worker, ruling that the company had shown enough evidence to go forward with the case and the trial court abused its discretion in granting a no-evidence summary judgment motion.

  • April 05, 2024

    NJ Smoking Law Violates Casino Workers' Rights, UAW Says

    A law preventing smoking in certain indoor workspaces violates New Jersey's Constitution by excluding casino workers, the United Auto Workers alleged Friday in a state court suit against the governor and state health department commissioner.

  • April 05, 2024

    Beverage Giant Sued Under Illinois Genetic Privacy Law

    Reyes Holdings, the largest beer distributor in the United States, has been sued in Illinois state court by a proposed class of job applicants who claim their genetic privacy rights were violated when they were required to submit to physical exams and inquiries about their family medical history as a condition of employment at the beverage distributor or its subsidiaries.

  • April 05, 2024

    Employment Authority: Gig Companies Go On Defense

    Law360 Employment Authority covers the biggest employment cases and trends. Catch up this week with coverage on what risks gig companies could face as they threaten to pull their apps from cities that add minimum wage requirements for gig workers, how employees' activities on social media are raising complex legal questions for employers, and why experts think federal law could preempt statutes passed by Southern states baring businesses that receive state economic incentives from voluntarily recognizing unions.

  • April 05, 2024

    11th Circ. Upholds College's Win In Student's Disability Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit on Thursday upheld Morehouse School of Medicine's win in a former student's suit claiming it failed to accommodate his disability by providing inadequate note-taking services, ruling that the Georgia federal court made no error in finding that the school had provided adequate accommodations.

  • April 05, 2024

    School District Seeks To Knock Out Teachers' Equal Pay Suit

    A school district asked a Pennsylvania federal judge Friday to toss or at least decertify a collective action alleging it paid male teachers more than women who had similar experience, arguing that the workers couldn't show they had enough in common to justify a group action.

  • April 05, 2024

    Contractor Settles Naturalized Citizen's Hiring Bias Claims

    A federal contractor settled claims that it slammed the brakes on hiring a naturalized citizen after finding out that she was not born in the U.S., the U.S. Department of Justice said.

  • April 05, 2024

    PAGA Repeal Bill On Nov. Ballot May Upend Calif. Labor Law

    A controversial bill going before Golden State voters in November has employment attorneys divided over its plan to replace California's Private Attorneys General Act with new legislation doubling penalties for willful labor-law violators, but leaving enforcement solely to a state agency that has proven ineffective in the past.

  • April 05, 2024

    Surgeon Denied Atty Fees After Erasure of $15M Sex Bias Win

    A Pennsylvania federal judge has denied attorney fees after undoing a $15 million verdict won by a surgeon who alleged that Thomas Jefferson University exhibited anti-male bias in investigating a medical resident's sexual assault claims against him, ruling a new trial was necessary.

  • April 05, 2024

    Reger Rizzo Hit With Race, Gender Bias Suit By Ex-Employee

    Reger Rizzo & Darnall LLP has been sued in Pennsylvania federal court by a former firm legal assistant alleging racial and sex discrimination, and claiming that a hostile, harassing and retaliatory work environment caused her to leave her job.

  • April 05, 2024

    Off The Bench: ACC Drama, Football Firing Suits Intensify

    In this week's Off The Bench, Florida State University cannot escape an ACC lawsuit that may enforce a nine-figure penalty against the school if it should leave the conference, while both Northwestern University and the Arizona Cardinals face more legal headaches over their decisions to fire key personnel.

  • April 05, 2024

    NC High Court Snapshot: Law Firm Battles Defamation Suit

    The Supreme Court of North Carolina has a stacked calendar heading into spring arguments, from an appeal over Black-owned properties targeted for demolition to a law firm's attempt at dodging defamation claims over allegations of voter fraud.

  • April 05, 2024

    Schneider National Forced Disabled Vet Off Job, Suit Says

    A former office worker for trucking company Schneider National Carriers Inc. says in a lawsuit filed Thursday in Massachusetts state court that the company changed his job description to include a daily yard check that he was unable to perform due to service-related disabilities, failed to provide a reasonable accommodation and then fired him.

  • April 05, 2024

    Wisconsin Bar Tweaks Diversity Definition Amid Bias Suit

    The State Bar of Wisconsin has erased a legal challenge related to its diversity clerkship program following a revision of its definition of diversity, though the federal case will continue over dues collections.

  • April 05, 2024

    Buchanan Ingersoll Adds Seyfarth Benefits Pro In NYC

    Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC announced the addition of a shareholder in the labor and employment practice of its New York City office from Seyfarth Shaw LLP who has extensive experience in employee benefits and executive compensation, as well as advanced academic expertise in energy and tax law.

  • April 05, 2024

    Calif. Cannabis Delivery Workers Vote To Authorize Strike

    California cannabis delivery company Eaze Technologies and its subsidiary Stachs LLC face a possible work stoppage just ahead of the April 20 weekend, after the union representing drivers announced they have rejected the companies' contract proposal and secured strike authorization from its members.

  • April 05, 2024

    Firefighters Union's Finance Firm Can't Spike Whistleblower Claim

    A finance firm set up for the nation's largest firefighters' union can't escape a whistleblower retaliation claim from the investment adviser it fired after he reported concerns to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, a Boston federal judge has ruled.

  • April 05, 2024

    11th Circ. Backs Auto Co.'s Win In Disability Bias Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit has refused to reinstate a worker's suit accusing an auto parts manufacturer of firing him because of his gastrointestinal issues, saying he couldn't rebut the company's argument that he was fired for falling asleep at work.

  • April 05, 2024

    Atlanta Braves Accused Of Denying Hire Over Deafness

    The Atlanta Braves were hit with an Americans with Disabilities Act lawsuit Thursday alleging the team turned down an IT director candidate because it was reluctant to accommodate his deafness.

  • April 05, 2024

    Barnes & Thornburg Adds Labor, Biz Immigration Pro

    Barnes & Thornburg LLP has hired an employment partner from Dorsey & Whitney LLP with 20 years of experience navigating companies through labor, employment and immigration matters.

Expert Analysis

  • 6 Ways To Minimize Risk, Remain Respectful During Layoffs

    Author Photo

    With a recent Resume Builder survey finding that 38% of companies expect to lay off employees this year, now is a good time for employers to review several strategies that can help mitigate legal risks and maintain compassion in the reduction-in-force process, says Sahara Pynes at Fox Rothschild.

  • 7 Common Myths About Lateral Partner Moves

    Author Photo

    As lateral recruiting remains a key factor for law firm growth, partners considering a lateral move should be aware of a few commonly held myths — some of which contain a kernel of truth, and some of which are flat out wrong, says Dave Maurer at Major Lindsey.

  • NYC Workplace AI Regulation Has Been Largely Insignificant

    Author Photo

    Though a Cornell University study suggests that a New York City law intended to regulate artificial intelligence in the workplace has had an underwhelming impact, the law may still help shape the city's future AI regulation efforts, say Reid Skibell and Nathan Ades at Glenn Agre.

  • Series

    Cheering In The NFL Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Balancing my time between a BigLaw career and my role as an NFL cheerleader has taught me that pursuing your passions outside of work is not a distraction, but rather an opportunity to harness important skills that can positively affect how you approach work and view success in your career, says Rachel Schuster at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Args In APA Case Amplify Justices' Focus On Agency Power

    Author Photo

    In arguments last week in Corner Post v. Federal Reserve, the U.S. Supreme Court justices paid particular importance to the possible ripple effects of their decision, which will address when a facial challenge to long-standing federal rules under the Administrative Procedure Act first accrues and could thus unleash a flood of new lawsuits, say attorneys at Snell & Wilmer.

  • Mitigating Whistleblower Risks After High Court UBS Ruling

    Author Photo

    While it is always good practice for companies to periodically review whistleblower trainings, policies and procedures, the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent whistleblower-friendly ruling in Murray v. UBS Securities helps demonstrate their importance in reducing litigation risk, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Using Arbitration And Class Waivers As Privacy Suit Tools

    Author Photo

    Amid a surge in data breach class actions over the last few years, several federal court decisions indicate that arbitration clauses and class action waiver provisions can be possible alternatives to public court battles and potentially reduce the costs of privacy litigation, say Mark Olthoff and Courtney Klaus at Polsinelli.

  • Future Not Looking Bright For Calif. Employee Nonsolicits

    Author Photo

    California's new legislation imposing potentially harsh consequences on employers for attempting to enforce noncompetes raises questions about the fate of employee nonsolicitation agreements — and both federal and state court decisions suggest the days of the latter may be numbered, say Anthony Oncidi and Philippe Lebel at Proskauer.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

    Author Photo

    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • Del. Ruling Stands Out In Thorny Noncompete Landscape

    Author Photo

    In Cantor Fitzgerald v. Ainslie, the Delaware Supreme Court last month upheld the enforceability of forfeiture-for-competition provisions in limited partnership agreements, providing a noteworthy opinion amid a time of increasing disfavor toward noncompetes and following a string of Chancery Court rulings deeming them unreasonable, say Margaret Butler and Steven Goldberg at BakerHostetler.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: February Lessons

    Author Photo

    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses five notable circuit court decisions on topics from property taxes to veteran's rights — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including class representative intervention, wage-and-hour dispute evidence and ascertainability requirements.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

    Author Photo

    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Reassessing Trade Secrets Amid Proposed Noncompete Ban

    Author Photo

    The Federal Trade Commission's proposed ban on noncompete agreements as well as state bans make it prudent for businesses to reevaluate and reinvigorate approaches to trade secret protection, including knowing what information employees are providing to vendors, and making sure confidentiality agreements are put in place before information is shared, says Rob Jensen at Wolf Greenfield.

  • NYC Cos. Must Prepare For Increased Sick Leave Liability

    Author Photo

    A recent amendment to New York City's sick leave law authorizes employees for the first time to sue their employers for violations — so employers should ensure their policies and practices are compliant now to avoid the crosshairs of litigation once the law takes effect in March, says Melissa Camire at Fisher Phillips.

  • Employer Best Practices In Light Of NY Anti-Trans Bias Report

    Author Photo

    A recent report from the New York State Department of Labor indicates that bias against transgender and nonbinary people endures in the workplace, highlighting why employers must create supportive policies and gender transition plans, not only to mitigate the risk of discrimination claims, but also to foster an inclusive work culture, says Michelle Phillips at Jackson Lewis.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Employment archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!