Georgia

  • March 20, 2024

    How The Supreme Court Could Narrow Chevron

    After hours of oral argument in a closely watched administrative law case, it appeared that some U.S. Supreme Court justices could be open to limiting the opportunities for lower courts to defer to federal agencies' legal interpretations in disputes over rulemaking — and legal experts said there are a number of ways they could do it.

  • March 20, 2024

    Breaking Down Each State's Climate Priority Policies

    Forty-five states have now completed climate action plans outlining how they'll advance federal climate goals through policy and programs in coming years, with most focusing at least in part on real estate development as a way to reduce emissions.

  • March 20, 2024

    Familiar Face Helps Morris Manning Restock Bankruptcy Team

    A former Burr & Forman LLP partner experienced in bankruptcy and commercial litigation matters has returned to Morris Manning & Martin LLP's Atlanta office, just as Morris Manning lost a group of bankruptcy attorneys to Barnes & Thornburg LLP.

  • March 20, 2024

    Law360 Announces The Members Of Its 2024 Editorial Boards

    Law360 is pleased to announce the formation of its 2024 Editorial Advisory Boards.

  • March 20, 2024

    11th Circ. Wage Ruling Highlights Volunteer Benefit Pitfalls

    An Eleventh Circuit ruling that a public agency operating golf courses did not owe a proposed class of golf attendants wages because they were not employees shows that clarity is needed when enlisting volunteers, attorneys said. Here, Law360 explores the issue.

  • March 20, 2024

    US Chamber's Litigation Funding Concerns Spur 2 State Laws

    Amid concerns from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce about third-party litigation funding, including from potentially hostile foreign entities, state legislatures in Indiana and West Virginia have recently passed bills imposing restrictions on the practice.

  • March 19, 2024

    Adult Shop Could Be Stuck Between Ordinance And Injunction

    An adult novelty chain urged Georgia's justices on Tuesday to reverse a trial court ruling that freed Gwinnett County from the store's lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of a 2015 ordinance change that restricts adult entertainment stores to certain locations and requires them to obtain an adult establishment license to operate.

  • March 19, 2024

    Trump Asks Supreme Court For Absolute Criminal Immunity

    Former President Donald Trump implored the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday to find that former presidents are absolutely immune from criminal charges related to official acts, warning the court that its adoption of a fact-specific test could appear as a "gerrymandered ruling tailored to deprive" him alone of immunity.

  • March 19, 2024

    Labor Dept. Hits Ga. Pesticide Maker With Whistleblower Suit

    The U.S. Department of Labor has hit a northeast Georgia pesticide manufacturer with a lawsuit accusing the company of firing an employee after she complained about repeated exposures to dangerous and sickening chemical fumes, the department said.

  • March 20, 2024

    Future Of Judge-Shopping Reform Hazy After Rule Proposal

    The policymaking body for U.S. courts provoked a stir last week when it proposed a rule designed to curb "judge shopping," with observers saying that the policy does address one type of the practice but that it remains to be seen if individual federal district courts will be willing to adopt even that limited reform.

  • March 19, 2024

    States Converge On Texas' Challenge To EPA Methane Rule

    A California-led coalition of Democratic attorneys general wants to defend new federal limits on oil and gas industry methane emissions challenged by Texas, Oklahoma and other conservative states, with supporters of the new rules claiming a sovereign interest in protecting their citizens from harmful greenhouse gas pollution.

  • March 19, 2024

    No 'True Threats' Made On Officials In Trump Case, Court Told

    An Alabama man indicted for allegedly threatening to harm the Georgia prosecutor spearheading the election interference case against former President Donald Trump wants the indictment against him tossed, arguing that he didn't make "true threats" and that his speech is protected by the First Amendement.

  • March 19, 2024

    Bradley Arant Adds Ex-Chamberlain Hrdlicka RE Team In Ga.

    Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP has strengthened its real estate practice in Atlanta with a four-attorney team from Chamberlain Hrdlicka White Williams & Aughtry.

  • March 19, 2024

    Alston & Bird, Ex-Staffer Dodge Ga. Judge's Contempt Threat

    A Georgia federal judge in a hearing Tuesday backed off a threat to hold in contempt lawyers for Alston & Bird LLP and a former diversity staffer who sued the firm, alleging unpaid overtime claims, over their repeated failures to file a $55,000 settlement agreement with the court.

  • March 18, 2024

    FCC Fines Ga. Radio Broadcaster Over Station Silences

    The former owner of a Georgia sports radio station has been slapped with a $16,200 fine by the FCC for repeatedly suspending operations, allowing the station to change hands without permission and not answering the agency's inquiries about any of it.

  • March 18, 2024

    How A Car Crash And 20 Years Of Litigation Ended With $25M

    A $25.5 million verdict returned by a Georgia jury for the family of a woman killed in a 2003 taxi crash was the result of decades of litigation perseverance, with more work ahead to help ensure that a similar tragedy does not occur, her family's lawyer told Law360.

  • March 18, 2024

    5 Moments That Swayed Ga. Judge In the Trump Case DQ Bid

    After days of testimony about the romantic and financial relationship between Fulton County District Attorney Fani T. Willis and the lawyer she appointed to lead the election interference case against Donald Trump, a Georgia judge last week ordered Willis to shuffle the prosecution team. How did he reach that ruling? Here are five moments that swayed the judge.

  • March 18, 2024

    Ga. Surgery Biz's False Claims Penalty Boosted To $5.4M

    A Georgia surgical center and its former head must now pay $5.4 million to end a kickback scheme tied to the indictment of the state's former insurance commissioner, an increase from a previous $3 million penalty that the federal government said the clinic and doctor had shirked.

  • March 18, 2024

    11th Circ. Urged To Nix Ala. Coach's Win In Gender Bias Suit

    Alabama State University has urged the Eleventh Circuit to reverse a win for the school's former softball coach, who claimed she was suspended because of her gender, saying she did not demonstrate a case of bias.

  • March 18, 2024

    Justices Won't Review Detention Officers' Overtime Suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court said Monday that it won't weigh in on whether a Georgia sheriff acted as an employer and qualifies for immunity from an overtime suit brought by two detention officers, rejecting the officers' bid for review of an Eleventh Circuit decision tossing their case.

  • March 18, 2024

    DC Panel Explains Denial Of Ethics Subpoena On Ex-DOJ Atty

    A subpoena from D.C. attorney ethics authorities demanding that former U.S. Department of Justice attorney Jeffrey Clark produce documents pertaining to his alleged role in promoting Donald Trump's stolen election narrative would be "sufficiently testimonial and potentially incriminating" to implicate the Fifth Amendment, a D.C. Court of Appeals panel ruled.

  • March 18, 2024

    Trump, Co-Defendants Seek Appeal Of Willis DQ Ruling

    Former President Donald Trump on Monday asked a Georgia judge to let him appeal a ruling allowing Fulton County District Attorney Fani T. Willis to continue prosecuting him and his co-defendants in the state's election interference case.

  • March 18, 2024

    Barnes & Thornburg Lands Morris Manning Bankruptcy Team

    Barnes & Thornburg LLP picked up a former Morris Manning & Martin LLP bankruptcy group in Atlanta, the firm announced Monday.

  • March 18, 2024

    Bookseller Says Ga. Jail's Book Policy Is Unconstitutional

    A Georgia bookseller filed a federal lawsuit Friday accusing an Atlanta-area sheriff of imposing an unlawful policy that only allows books into the county jail from "authorized retailers" under the guise of security concerns, alleging the practice is arbitrary, subjective, and an "unconstitutional permitting scheme."

  • March 18, 2024

    Doctors Keep Win In Suit Over Patient's Drowning Death

    A Georgia appeals court won't revive claims from the parents of a man who died by drowning after he was discharged from an Augusta hospital, saying the death is too far removed from his treatment and discharge, and the court can only speculate as to what led to the death.

Expert Analysis

  • Navigating Discovery Of Generative AI Information

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools become increasingly ubiquitous, companies must make sure to preserve generative AI data when there is reasonable expectation of litigation, and to include transcripts in litigation hold notices, as they may be relevant to discovery requests, say Nick Peterson and Corey Hauser at Wiley.

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

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    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Questions Awaiting Justices In 'Repugnant' Verdicts Hearing

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    In McElrath v. Georgia, the U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether the double jeopardy clause bars retrial when a jury reaches a so-called repugnant, or logically contradictory, verdict — with the ultimate resolution resting on how this narrow issue is framed, say Brook Dooley and Cody Gray at Keker Van Nest.

  • How Justices Could Rule On A Key Copyright Statute

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    Attorneys at Manatt discuss how the U.S. Supreme Court may choose to address a fundamental accrual issue in Warner Chappell Music v. Nealy, which precedents the court may look to in analyzing the issue and the challenges copyright claimants may face going forward.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

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    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • 1st Tax Easement Convictions Will Likely Embolden DOJ, IRS

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    After recent convictions in the first criminal tax fraud trial over allegedly abusive syndicated conservation easements, the IRS and U.S. Department of Justice will likely pursue other promoters for similar alleged conspiracies — though one acquittal may help attorneys better evaluate their clients' exposure, say Bill Curtis and Lauren DeSantis-Then at Polsinelli.

  • The Self-Funded Plan's Guide To Gender-Affirming Coverage

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    Self-funded group health plans face complicated legal risks when determining whether to cover gender-affirming health benefits for their transgender participants, so plan sponsors should carefully weigh how federal nondiscrimination laws and state penalties for providing care for trans minors could affect their decision to offer coverage, say Tim Kennedy and Anne Tyler Hall at Hall Benefits Law.

  • Lenders Must Prep For Ga. Commercial Financing Disclosures

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    Since Georgia’s new commercial financing disclosure requirements may be a lender's first foray into complicated Truth-In-Lending-Act-style laws, providers should work with investor counterparties to prepare early disclosures, in compliance with statutory tolerances, for borrowers whose loan agreements take effect Jan. 1, says Melissa Richards at Buchalter.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

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    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • Ga. Ruling A Win For Plaintiffs Injured By Older Products

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    The Georgia Supreme Court's recent opinion in Ford Motor Co. v. Cosper gives plaintiffs the assurance that even if they are injured by older products, they can still bring claims under state law if the manufacturer used a design that it knew, or should have known, created a risk of substantial harm, says Rob Snyder at Cannella Snyder.

  • Pro Bono Work Is Powerful Self-Help For Attorneys

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    Oct. 22-28 is Pro Bono Week, serving as a useful reminder that offering free legal help to the public can help attorneys expand their legal toolbox, forge community relationships and create human connections, despite the challenges of this kind of work, says Orlando Lopez at Culhane Meadows.

  • Series

    Playing In A Rock Cover Band Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Performing in a classic rock cover band has driven me to hone several skills — including focus, organization and networking — that have benefited my professional development, demonstrating that taking time to follow your muse outside of work can be a boon to your career, says Michael Gambro at Cadwalader.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Espinosa On 'Lincoln Lawyer'

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    The murder trials in Netflix’s “The Lincoln Lawyer” illustrate the stark contrast between the ethical high ground that fosters and maintains the criminal justice system's integrity, and the ethical abyss that can undermine it, with an important reminder for all legal practitioners, say Judge Adam Espinosa and Andrew Howard at the Colorado 2nd Judicial District Court.

  • What Panama Canal Award Ruling Means For Int'l Arbitration

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    As the prevalence of international arbitration grows, the Eighth Circuit’s recent decision in Grupo Unidos v. Canal de Panama may change how practitioners decide what remedies to seek and where to raise them if claims are rejected, says Jerry Roth at FedArb.

  • Hollywood Labor Negotiations Provide AI Road Map

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    Sigma Khan at Henein Hutchison uses the recent Hollywood labor strikes — one of the first instances of a mass entertainment industry legal conflict where concerns over artificial intelligence's intrusion into the workspace has become a crucial issue — to analyze how litigation, legislation and contracts can aid in a landscape transformation precipitated by AI.

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