Government Contracts

  • February 27, 2024

    Energy, Infrastructure Expert Rejoins V&E In Houston

    Vinson & Elkins LLP is welcoming back a longtime attorney, announcing Monday that an energy and infrastructure expert is rejoining the firm as a partner in its Houston office after a brief foray working with an energy emissions reduction software company.

  • February 26, 2024

    KBR Urges 4th Circ. To OK $8M Award Against Kuwaiti Co.

    A global engineering corporation has asked the Fourth Circuit not to overturn a lower court decision enforcing an approximately $8 million arbitral award against a Kuwaiti construction company after a dispute over Iraqi wartime contracts, saying nothing warrants upending the award.

  • February 26, 2024

    Ligado Claims Iridium Bias In $40B Spectrum Takings Case

    Ligado Networks has pushed back against Iridium Communications' bid to back the government in Ligado's $40 billion lawsuit accusing the government of unlawfully taking over a spectrum it secured exclusive licensing for, saying Iridium had ulterior motives for filing a friend-of-the-court brief.

  • February 26, 2024

    Inmate, 8 Others Charged In Trafficking, Tax Fraud Schemes

    A California prison inmate has been charged along with eight other individuals with operating two separate illegal schemes: one to distribute methamphetamine and another to fraudulently claim over $550 million in COVID-19-based tax credits.

  • February 26, 2024

    Journos Say Feds Can't Delay Contractor Demographic Data

    The Center for Investigative Reporting urged a California federal court not to allow the U.S. Department of Labor to withhold government contractor demographic reports, arguing that any further delays in disclosure would harm the public.

  • February 26, 2024

    Teva Tells 1st Circ. Feds Must Clear High Bar In FCA Case

    Teva Pharmaceuticals told the First Circuit on Monday that the federal government should be held to — and cannot meet — a strict causation standard in a False Claims Act kickback case, asking the court to settle a matter of first impression in the circuit.

  • February 26, 2024

    6th Circ. Sanctions Prison Co. For Not Disclosing Asset Info

    A Sixth Circuit panel has held a Federal Bureau of Prisons contractor in contempt for its "woefully inadequate" efforts to turn over financial records to the National Labor Relations Board as ordered, in a dispute over two fired union supporters' back pay.

  • February 26, 2024

    Feds Say Fla. Atty Can't Undo COVID Relief Fraud Conviction

    A U.S. attorney's office has pushed back on a Florida lawyer's bid to vacate her conviction in Georgia federal court of conspiring to defraud a coronavirus pandemic relief program, saying the government doesn't have to prove she was "behind the keyboard" when the applications were submitted to be convicted of the charges.

  • February 26, 2024

    Justices Decline Standard Chartered Sanction Evasion Suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to consider whether a whistleblower should've been granted a hearing in a lower court to support allegations that Standard Chartered Bank cleared roughly $56 billion in violation of U.S. sanctions against Iran.

  • February 26, 2024

    Justices Say Tribes Can Argue Separately In Healthcare Row

    Two Native American tribes seeking to uphold rulings that ordered the federal government to reimburse them millions of dollars in administrative healthcare costs can argue their cases separately, the U.S. Supreme Court said Monday.

  • February 23, 2024

    DOD Watchdog Flags Increased Emphasis On Contract Fraud

    The U.S. Department of Defense's internal watchdog has been expending more effort to fight procurement fraud, in "a shift" from healthcare fraud being the primary focus for federal investigators, according to Inspector General Robert Storch.

  • February 23, 2024

    Feds Back ICE Contractor In 9th Circ. Detainee Wage Fight

    The federal government told the Ninth Circuit that immigrant detainees at contractor-run facilities aren't covered by state labor laws, backing GEO Group Inc.'s effort to overturn $23.2 million in judgments that found a detainee work program violated Washington's minimum wage law.

  • February 23, 2024

    Groups Back Texas' Bid To Void Feds' Highway GHG Rule

    Construction trade groups have thrown their support behind the state of Texas' federal lawsuit seeking to vacate a new U.S. Department of Transportation rule requiring states to set targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from federally funded highway projects.

  • February 23, 2024

    Denver Jury Awards Aecom $5M In Toll Lanes Fight

    A Denver federal jury awarded construction design firm Aecom $5.25 million in damages Friday for a subcontractor's failure to pay for design services for a Colorado highway expansion, and rejected the subcontractor's attempt to get $260 million in counterclaims.

  • February 23, 2024

    Motorola, Mass. Police Sued For Using Intercepting Devices

    Motorola sold technology that let the Massachusetts State Police make illegal, warrantless recordings during investigations, according to a federal class action filed by four men claiming to be subjects of the secret recordings.

  • February 23, 2024

    US Hits Russia With Largest Sanctions Since Ukraine Invasion

    The U.S. announced over 500 new sanctions on Russia Friday following the death of opposition leader Alexei Navalny, marking the largest number of sanctions since Moscow invaded Ukraine two years ago.

  • February 23, 2024

    Aversion To Fixed-Price Deals May Compel Gov't To Change

    An emerging trend among large defense contractors to avoid fixed-price contracts with the federal government may force agencies to ease up on inflexible terms that undermine contractors' efforts to mitigate the lingering effects of COVID-19 and current inflation.

  • February 22, 2024

    Wash. Tribe Awarded Land Comp Funds After 50-Year Battle

    In a decision the Chinook Indian Nation on Thursday called groundbreaking for other Indigenous communities, the federal government determined that the tribe will receive more than $48,000 from an Indian Claims Commission judgment handed down half a century ago as compensation for the seizure of the tribe's ancestral lands.

  • February 22, 2024

    NY Offshore Wind Project Gets Final Green Light From Feds

    The Biden administration said Thursday it has approved the Empire Wind offshore wind energy project's construction and operations plan, clearing the way for construction of two wind facilities off the coast of Long Island, New York.

  • February 22, 2024

    DOJ Reports $2.7B False Claims Act Haul In 2023

    The U.S. Department of Justice on Thursday released its latest data on recoveries under the False Claims Act, saying there were nearly $2.7 billion in settlements and judgments in the 2023 fiscal year, an increase from the prior year's haul. 

  • February 22, 2024

    Comerica Brass Sued Over Benefit Cards Contract Oversight

    Executives and directors of financial services company Comerica were hit with a shareholder derivative suit alleging they failed to disclose the company was mismanaging a lucrative government benefits card program by allowing sensitive data to be handled at an international vendor's office.

  • February 22, 2024

    Feds Can't Offset Nuclear Cleanup Bill With Trusts' Earnings

    The U.S. Department of Energy wasn't able to convince the U.S. Court of Federal Claims that nuclear utilities' high earnings on nuclear decommissioning funds should erase their $149 million damages claim against the department for delayed nuclear waste cleanup, according to an opinion made public this week.

  • February 22, 2024

    ICE's Immunity Bars Bulk Of Virus Death Suit, For Now

    U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has for now dodged most of a lawsuit over the death of a man who contracted COVID-19 in detention, after a California federal court ruled that sovereign immunity barred most of the case.

  • February 22, 2024

    GAO Backs VA's Need For Licensed Contractor

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office backed the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs' requirement for an Illinois company to be licensed in Oregon for a security guard service deal in the state, rejecting the company's contention that the requirement unduly restricted competition.

  • February 22, 2024

    Esformes Gets Time Served In Plea Deal With Gov't

    The yearslong prosecution against Miami nursing home mogul Philip Esformes ended Thursday when he pled guilty to one of the pending healthcare fraud charges against him and was sentenced to time served.

Expert Analysis

  • A Cautionary Tale On Hospital-Physician Alignment Structures

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    A $345 million settlement between the U.S. Department of Justice and Community Health Network highlights how quickly hospital and physician alignment relationships can violate legal restrictions on such dealings, and the onerous financial penalties that can ensue, say Robert Threlkeld and Elliott Coward at Morris Manning.

  • Contract Disputes Recap: The Terms Matter

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    Stephanie Magnell and Zachary Jacobson at Seyfarth examine recent decisions from the U.S. Civilian Board of Contract Appeals, the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals and the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, which offer reminders about the importance of including contract terms to address the unexpected circumstances that may interfere with performance.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • Opinion

    Biden Admin's March-In Plan Would Hurt Medical Innovation

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    The Biden administration's proposal to reinterpret the Bayh-Dole Act and allow the government to claw back patents when it determines that a commercialized product's price is too high would discourage private investment in important research and development, says Ken Thorpe at the Rollins School of Public Health.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • How DOD Can Improve Flexibility Under Proposed Cyber Rule

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    The U.S. Department of Defense should carefully address some of the more nuanced aspects of the Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification program to avoid unintended consequences, specifically the proposal to severely limit contractor use of plans of actions and milestones, say Joshua Duvall at Maynard Nexsen and Sandeep Kathuria at L3Harris Technologies.

  • Fed. Circ. Ruling Helps Clarify When Gov't Clawback Is Timely

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    The Federal Circuit’s examination of claims accrual in a January decision that allows the Defense Contract Management Agency to pursue overpayment claims under a cost-reimbursement contract serves as a reminder that the government can lose such claims by waiting too long to file, say Evan Sherwood and Peter Hutt at Covington.

  • Preparing For DOJ's Data Analytics Push In FCPA Cases

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    After the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent announcement that it will leverage data analytics in Foreign Corrupt Practice Act investigations and prosecutions, companies will need to develop a compliance strategy that likewise implements data analytics to get ahead of enforcement risks, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Considering The Logical Extremes Of Your Legal Argument

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    Recent oral arguments in the federal election interference case against former President Donald Trump highlighted the age-old technique of extending an argument to its logical limit — a principle that is still important for attorneys to consider in preparing their cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • How 3 New Laws Change Calif. Nonprofits' Legal Landscape

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    Legislation that went into effect on Jan. 1 should be welcomed by California’s nonprofit organizations, which may now receive funding more quickly, rectify past noncompliance more easily and have greater access to the states’ security funding program, say Casey Williams and Brett Overby at Liebert Cassidy.

  • ChristianaCare Settlement Reveals FCA Pitfalls For Hospitals

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    ChristianaCare's False Claims Act settlement in December is the first one based on a hospital allegedly providing private physicians with free services in the form of hospital-employed clinicians and provides important compliance lessons as the government ramps up scrutiny of compensation arrangements, say attorneys at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • Freight Forwarders And Common Carriers: Know Your Cargo

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    Freight forwarders and other nonprincipal parties involved in global cargo movement should follow the guidance in the multi-agency know-your-cargo compliance note to avoid enforcement actions should they fail to spot evasive tactics used in supply chains to circumvent U.S. sanctions and export controls, say attorneys at Venable.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Opinion

    The PLUS Act Is The Best Choice For Veterans

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    Of two currently pending federal legislative proposals, the Preserving Lawful Utilization of Services Act's plan to diversify and expedite the processing of veterans' claims through an expanded network of accredited providers offers the better solution, say Michael Andrews at McGuireWoods and Matthew Feehan at Nearside Solutions.

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