Intellectual Property UK

  • March 18, 2024

    Packaging Patent Gets Amended For 'Lack Of Inventive Step'

    A packaging company has partially succeeded in appealing a decision to uphold a patented method for checking the position of adhesive labels on sheet materials, with European officials finding that aspects of the technique would be "obvious to the skilled person."

  • March 18, 2024

    Pharma Cos Sign €40M Deal To Market Hearing Loss Drug

    Specialty pharma business Norgine BV has secured an exclusive licensing agreement worth €40 million ($43 million) to sell a medication that reduces the risk of hearing loss in young chemotherapy patients, the drug's producer Fennec has announced.

  • March 15, 2024

    Quantum Spinoff Breached Fiduciary Duty In TM Dispute

    Quantum Actuarial LLP has lost an appeal to force its predecessor, Quantum Advisory Ltd., to let it use the "Quantum" name as it branched off the business, after a London court found that the actuarial business was wrongly acting out of self-interest.

  • March 15, 2024

    Biotech Unit Beats Challenge Over Chemical Library Patent

    A unit of a Swiss biotech has won its bid to patent a method for DNA-encoded chemical libraries, after European officials ruled that a challenge to the application lacked substance.

  • March 15, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen Howard Kennedy face legal action by a London hotel chain, former racing boss Bernie Ecclestone and Formula One hit with a breach of contract claim by a Brazilian racecar driver, and a libel row between broadcaster Jeremy Vine and ex-footballer Joey Barton. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • March 15, 2024

    Spanish Winery Blocks 'Casa Del Sol' TM Over Similarities

    A Spanish winery has successfully contested a rival registering a trademark for the words "Casa del Sol," after the European Union Intellectual Property Office ruled there is a risk of confusion when compared with its earlier marks.

  • March 15, 2024

    Powell Gilbert Pros Warn Of Big Changes In IP Litigation

    The life sciences sector should brace itself for change as transformative technology creates new disputes, the sector adjusts to the Unified Patent Court and EU proposals to overhaul standard essential patent licensing could cause upheaval, three partners tell Law360.

  • March 14, 2024

    Nokia Sues Verifone For Infringing SEPs With Payments Tech

    Nokia has sued Verifone in Europe for illegally using its connectivity technologies in devices used to process transactions, claiming that these point-of-sale products are infringing a mix of standard essential patents.

  • March 14, 2024

    Ocado's UPC Appeal Weighs 'Reasonable Request' For Docs

    Online supermarket giant Ocado has urged the appellate wing of the Unified Patent Court to consider the interests of all sides before granting access to court documents, in a landmark appeal that could set the stage for transparency for the UPC going forward.

  • March 14, 2024

    Pfizer, Bristol-Myers Can't Revive Eliquis Patent At EPO

    Pfizer and a Bristol-Myers Squibb unit have failed to rescue their jointly owned patent over the blockbuster blood thinner Eliquis in Europe after eight rivals convinced an appeals panel that the key compound in the formula was not inventive.

  • March 14, 2024

    Craig Wright Timeline: From Australia To The London Courts

    Computer scientist Craig Wright's one-man mission to prove to the courts that he is the elusive creator of bitcoin came to an end Thursday as a London judge rejected his claim in one of the most-discussed intellectual property cases in the English courts. Here, Law360 looks back at the history of Wright's claims.

  • March 14, 2024

    Wright Is Not The Inventor Of Bitcoin, Judge Rules

    A London judge ruled Thursday that Australian computer scientist Craig Wright is not the pseudonymous inventor of bitcoin, ruling that the evidence against his claim to be Satoshi Nakamoto was "overwhelming."

  • March 13, 2024

    Developer Of The Witcher Loses EU TM For Gwent Card Game

    The developer behind popular video game title The Witcher has lost protections over a "G" logo for its Gwent card game after a European Union appeals panel ruled that the company had failed to put the trademark to use.

  • March 13, 2024

    Advertising Co. Appeals Loss Over Rival's Billboard Tech IP

    Sports advertising firm Supponor on Wednesday fought to overturn a finding that it had infringed a rival's patent for moving digital billboard displays, saying its technology can't infringe because it's an obvious extension of its own previous patent.

  • March 13, 2024

    Medical Device Maker Sues Rival Over Bladder Stone Tech

    A Chinese medical device maker has accused a rival of infringing its patented suction device to remove bladder stones by marketing a similar-looking sheath at an annual industry conference.

  • March 13, 2024

    EasyGroup Fights Beauty Retailer Over easyCOSMETIC TM

    EasyGroup has accused beauty products retailer easyCOSMETIC of infringing its easyJet trademark, arguing in a London court on Wednesday that the online store's logo is leading customers to falsely believe it is associated with the group.

  • March 13, 2024

    Security Tech Biz Claims $12.5M For 'Obsolete' CCTV Software

    A Taiwanese security technology company has countersued an AI video analytics business for $12.5 million over a deal to buy the rights to CCTV-analyzing technology, arguing that the software it bought was "near obsolete."

  • March 13, 2024

    Boston Scientific Gets Heart Valve Patent On Appeal

    Boston Scientific has convinced European officials to grant it a patent over a stent valve based on an amendment that specified the use of a biomedical textile, which finally meant the invention was new.

  • March 13, 2024

    EU Parliament Overwhelmingly Passes Landmark AI Law

    European Union lawmakers voted overwhelmingly on Wednesday in favor of a first-of-its-kind artificial intelligence law, in a bid to help facilitate innovation while safeguarding the bloc's fundamental rights.

  • March 12, 2024

    Rihanna Instagram Ruling A Warning Shot For Brand Collabs

    Puma's delay in securing design rights for one of its shoes after then-creative director Rihanna posted images showing off the sneakers poses a warning for brands to consider intellectual property protections prior to striking a deal with famous collaborators.

  • March 12, 2024

    Ericsson Fights To Fend Off Lenovo FRAND Battle In UK

    Ericsson asked a London court on Tuesday to reject Lenovo's request for fair rates for the use of each other's patents to be set in the U.K., arguing that the Chinese tech giant was forum shopping to disturb ongoing proceedings in the U.S.

  • March 12, 2024

    Volvo Hits The Brakes On Polish Car Co.'s 'Vosco' TM

    Volvo has persuaded European intellectual property officials to reject a bid by a Polish car manufacturer to get trademark protection for "Vosco Automotive" because it would exploit the Swedish auto giant's renown.

  • March 12, 2024

    'Clearer Than Ever' That Wright Is Not Satoshi, Developers Say

    Lawyers for developers seeking to prove that Craig Wright is not the pseudonymous inventor of bitcoin told the High Court that it is "clearer than ever" that the Australian computer scientist is not Satoshi Nakamoto in closing arguments on Tuesday.

  • March 12, 2024

    Tequila Regulator Wins Appeal Over 'Genquila' Wine TM

    The industry regulator for tequila has convinced European officials to nix a trademark for "Dutch Genquila" that had been granted for wine products, after demonstrating that buyers would still think of the Mexican spirits.

  • March 12, 2024

    Motorbike Apparel Biz Sues Retailers For Design Infringement

    A motorcycle clothing company has sued several retailers for £50,000 ($63,800) in a London court for allegedly infringing its design rights over multiple protective apparel styles.

Expert Analysis

  • Copyright Trial Defense Tips From 'Thinking Out Loud' Case

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    The twofold defense strategy that earned Ed Sheeran his recent "Thinking Out Loud" copyright trial victory revealed the strength of a musician's testimony, the importance of a consistent narrative and the power of public policy arguments when combating infringement claims, say Jonathan Phillips and Latrice Burks at Larson.

  • Getty Case Will Be Pivotal For Generative AI Copyright Issues

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    The Getty v. Stability AI litigation in the U.K. and U.S. raises legal ambiguities on who owns generative artificial intelligence output, and the outcomes will set a major precedent on copyright practices for businesses in both countries and beyond, say Victoria Albrecht at Springbok AI and Mark O'Conor at DLA Piper.

  • Global M&A Outlook: Slow But Moving Along

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    Global merger and acquisition markets had a tough start to the year, with inflation, rising interest rates and the Ukraine conflict knocking sentiment, but in the macroeconomic, deal makers have continued to unearth pockets of activity to keep deal volumes ticking over, say lawyers at White & Case.

  • Emmentaler Case Elucidates Recipe For EU Food Trademarks

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    In light of the EU General Court recently rejecting the Emmentaler cheese trademark application for lacking distinctive character and not meeting the geographical indication requirements, producers must ensure to protect their trade names before they become commercially generic, says Lars Karnoe at Potter Clarkson.

  • Unified Patent Court Advantages Leave US Trailing Behind

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    Amplifying the shortcomings of litigation in the U.S., including inter partes reviews that significantly threaten the validity of patents, the recently launched Unified Patent Court regime will put further pressure on American legislators and add to Europe's attractiveness as a litigation venue, say lawyers at Sisvel and Franzosi Dal Negro.

  • The Path Forward For Blockchain Patents In The UK And EU

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    The U.K. Intellectual Property Office's recent refusal of an IGT patent application highlights that certain blockchain innovations, including those relating to improved security, are more likely to be patentable than others, which is consistent with the overall European approach and available data, says Andrew Rudhall at Haseltine Lake.

  • USPTO's Speed On Some China Patents Bears A Closer Look

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    While all U.S. Patent and Trademark Office expedited programs are meant to be examined in the same manner, a survey of Patent Prosecution Highway actions indicates some examination processes may favor applications originating in China, says Julie Burke at IP Quality Pro.

  • French And UK Patent Litigation Will Likely Influence The UPC

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    The newly opened Unified Patent Court represents a seismic, yet untested, change to how patent litigation is conducted within Europe, and the practices of French and U.K. courts may play a role in its development, including on issues such as saisies and document production, say lawyers at Gowling.

  • AI-Fueled Innovation Poses Patentability Challenges

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    Robert Plotkin at Blueshift IP explores questions about standards for inventorship, nonobviousness and disclosure as patent practitioners, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, and the courts grapple with rapid innovation in AI technology.

  • Benefits Of Unified Patent Court Compared To Local Litigation

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    Recently opened for business, the Unified Patent Court offers a faster, cheaper and more streamlined solution to handle patent disputes compared to EU countries and the U.S., and could become the most important forum for patent litigation in Europe, if not worldwide, say lawyers at McDermott.

  • Global Issues In EU's Licensing Plans For Essential Patents

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    Consultants at Analysis Group explore questions surrounding the recently announced EU licensing framework for standard-essential patents, and how the European Commission's goals may influence discussions of issues like procedure, efficiency and transparency in the U.S. and elsewhere.

  • EPO Decision Adds To Sparse Case Law On Core AI Patents

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    The recent European Patent Office Board of Appeal decision in the Sparsely connected neural network/Mitsubishi case is remarkable for its technicality, and provides rare guidance for companies on the requirements for core artificial intelligence invention patents, says Alexander Korenberg at Kilburn & Strode.

  • A Deep Dive Into EU Unified Patent Court Policy

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    Robert Sterne at Sterne Kessler offers a detailed analysis of the EU's Unified Patent Court and the unitary patent, which go live on June 1, discussing what U.S. practitioners need to know from an enforcement and freedom-to-operate perspective.

  • AI And Copyright: Tracking The Ownership Issues

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    The rise of generative AI has created copyright and ownership challenges in creative industries, but contractual agreements, intellectual property law and AI-specific regulations can be used to address these issues, says Kimiya Shams at Devialet.

  • How Ed Sheeran's Serenade May Have Swayed The Jury

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    While Ed Sheeran's performance of his hit song "Thinking Out Loud" at trial could not protect him from the subconscious copying doctrine, it may have tapped into jurors' intuitions about independent creation, winning him the copyright infringement suit over the song, says Christopher Buccafusco at Duke University School of Law.

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