International Arbitration

  • May 02, 2024

    New EU, Japan Initiative Looks To Boost Global Supply Chains

    Japan and the European Union on Thursday announced a new initiative aimed at alleviating the economic dependence countries may have on others for certain goods by boosting global supply chains through transparency and coordination with like-minded countries.

  • May 02, 2024

    Sullivan & Cromwell Creates National Security Practice Group

    Sullivan & Cromwell LLP has launched a national security practice to help clients with matters stemming from the increased use of economic sanctions, anti-money laundering laws, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, foreign investment regulations, export controls and import restrictions, the firm said Thursday.

  • May 01, 2024

    Amazon Can't Sanction Atty In Chinese Seller Award Case

    Amazon can't sanction a Manhattan lawyer for her alleged history of using "frivolous" legal arguments to try to send back to state court litigation to vacate arbitral awards involving Chinese sellers, a New York federal judge ruled Wednesday.

  • May 01, 2024

    5th Circ. Nixes Use Of US Law In Maritime Malaria Dispute

    The Fifth Circuit on Wednesday overturned an order permitting an Indian man to invoke U.S. law in his lawsuit accusing a Singaporean ship management company of negligence after he contracted malaria during a trip to Gabon while working aboard a Liberian-flagged cargo ship.

  • May 01, 2024

    Crescent Petroleum Wins OK Of $2.75B Award

    Iran's state-owned oil company cannot escape having to pay an arbitral award now worth more than $2.75 billion owed to Crescent Petroleum after spending some two years ignoring the Emirati oil company's enforcement lawsuit in Washington, D.C., a federal judge ruled on Tuesday.

  • May 08, 2024

    Mantle Law Hires Construction Pro From Pinsent Masons

    Mantle Law (UK) LLP has hired a partner from Pinsent Masons LLP to its specialist construction, infrastructure and energy disputes practice in London, with the recruit kicking off his new role on Wednesday, amid a belief that boutique law firms are "coming of age."

  • April 30, 2024

    Chairman Ousted After Sex Scandal Looks To Prod Arbitration

    The ousted chairman of software investment company The Resource Group International Ltd. is urging a New York court to order his former company to submit to his arbitration claim, in which he accuses its top brass of improperly profiting after he resigned following a sexual harassment scandal.

  • April 30, 2024

    Chiquita Capitalized On Colombian War, Victims' Families Say

    Attorneys representing the families of 10 men killed during Colombia's civil war told a Florida federal jury Tuesday that the Chiquita banana company is liable for their deaths, saying it knowingly funded a right-wing narcoterrorist group that committed atrocities against its workers as the fruit corporation expanded its business.

  • April 30, 2024

    Insurance Mogul Can't Escape $164M Dutch Payout Yet

    A shareholder accused of raiding a Dutch insurer's coffers can't stop it from trying to enforce a nearly $164 million arbitration victory, a North Carolina federal judge ruled, finding that he didn't show it's not enforceable in U.S. courts.

  • April 30, 2024

    HSF's Paula Hodges On Arbitration's Future — And Her Own

    Herbert Smith Freehills LLP announced earlier this month that Paula Hodges KC will retire from the firm as of Wednesday, with Simon Chapman KC and Andrew Cannon taking her place as co-heads of the global arbitration practice. Law360 recently sat down with Hodges, who spent her entire 37-year career at Herbert Smith Freehills, to talk about what's next, how commercial arbitration has evolved over her career, and her experience as one of the first women in international arbitration.

  • April 30, 2024

    Oil Co. Claims Nigeria In For Windfall From $11B Win Legal Bill

    An oil and gas company urged a London appellate court on Tuesday to change the currency for Nigeria's legal costs from a battle over an $11 billion arbitration award due to bribery and fraud, arguing the West African state would profit from exchange rate fluctuations.

  • April 30, 2024

    Know Your AI Tools' Limits, Silicon Valley Arbitrators Warn

    All participants in an arbitration proceeding that incorporates artificial intelligence are responsible for understanding the tech's use and limitations, according to guidelines released Tuesday by the Silicon Valley Arbitration & Mediation Center.

  • April 29, 2024

    Herbert Smith Adds Bankruptcy Pro To Thai Disputes Practice

    Herbert Smith Freehills has hired an expert in construction disputes and insolvency and bankruptcy matters as a new partner for its Bangkok office, a move the firm says will strengthen its disputes practice in Thailand's capital.

  • April 29, 2024

    Dentons, Boies Schiller Hit With $300M Fraud Suit

    The owner of a company that attempted to contract with Senegal to develop a power plant in the African nation has filed a $300 million racketeering suit against Dentons and Boies Schiller Flexner LLP, accusing the BigLaw firms of fraud and extortion in connection with their allegedly botched representation of the company.

  • April 29, 2024

    'Tornado Cash' Crypto Fraud Wasn't Free Speech, Feds Say

    The founder of the Tornado Cash cryptocurrency exchange is mistaken in his arguments that First Amendment protections on computer code are grounds to dismiss his money laundering and sanctions-dodging charges, prosecutors told a Manhattan federal judge.

  • April 29, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    A multibillion-dollar Tesla trust proposal, a Truth Social bond, power plays over Prince's estate, and three in the ring for World Wrestling Entertainment. All of this and much more came up in Delaware Chancery Court dockets last week.

  • April 29, 2024

    9th Circ. Urged To Revive Nazi-Looted Art Claim

    A California man who has been trying for nearly two decades to get a Spanish museum to return a painting that the Nazis stole from his great-grandmother is urging the Ninth Circuit to rethink a unanimous panel decision concluding that the museum is under no obligation to do so.

  • April 29, 2024

    Venezuela Says It Has Proof Of Special Master Improprieties

    Venezuela has asked a Delaware federal judge to disqualify the special master overseeing the sale of Citgo Petroleum Corp.'s parent company to repay billions of dollars in Venezuelan debt, saying it now has proof he engaged in improper advocacy before the Biden administration.

  • April 29, 2024

    Justices Deny Review Of Hezbollah-Tied Bank's Immunity

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to examine whether sovereign immunity shields a defunct Lebanese bank from terrorism victims' allegations the bank funded Hezbollah, despite the victims' contention that an answer would provide clarity for disputes involving foreign trade.

  • April 26, 2024

    Law360 Reveals Titans Of The Plaintiffs Bar

    In the past year, plaintiffs have won settlements and judgments for millions and billions of dollars from companies such as Wells Fargo, Goldman Sachs, Facebook and Fox News, with many high-profile cases finally wrapping up after years of fighting. Such cases — involving over-the-top compensation packages, chemical contamination, gender discrimination and data mining — were led by attorneys whose accomplishments earned them recognition as Law360's Titans of the Plaintiffs Bar for 2024.

  • April 26, 2024

    Europeans Try To Ease Dispute Process In Canada Trade Pact

    The European Commission on Friday proposed new rules to help small and medium-sized businesses access a yet-to-be established investor court that was included in the bloc's nearly seven-year-old trade deal with Canada.

  • April 26, 2024

    Panama Canal Project Fight Sent Back To Chancery

    A Delaware federal judge on Thursday remanded litigation arising from a lucrative port project near the Panama Canal in an order that also notes his "deep concerns" over a theory that the dispute belongs in arbitration, made by the companies accused of stealing control of the project.

  • April 26, 2024

    Petrol Mogul Says Subsidiary Liable For $7M Baker Botts Fees

    An Egyptian energy tycoon has denied allegations in a London court that he owes Baker Botts LLP almost $7 million in fees for two of his petrochemical companies, arguing that a partner at the law firm said his company would not be liable for the costs of its subsidiaries.

  • April 25, 2024

    Incarceration Can't Get Default Nixed In $92M Award Suit

    A California federal court has refused to set aside an entry of default against a Russian businessman accused of engaging in a scheme to avoid paying a more than $92 million arbitral award, rejecting his defense that he couldn't respond because he was incarcerated in France.

  • April 25, 2024

    Exail Looks To Nix Suit Challenging Award In Aerospace Feud

    High-tech industrial group Exail SAS on Thursday urged a New York court to toss litigation filed by two units of French aerospace and defense corporation Safran looking to vacate an arbitral award issued in a high-stakes dispute arising from a decades-old licensing agreement.

Expert Analysis

  • Examining The Arbitration Clause Landscape Amid Risks

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    Amid a new wave of mass arbitrations, recent developments in the courts and from the American Arbitration Association suggest that companies should improve arbitration clause drafting to protect themselves against big-ticket settlements and avoid major potential liability, say attorneys at Benesch.

  • Insurance Policy Takeaways From UK Lockdown Loss Ruling

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    An English court's recent decision in Unipolsai v. Covea, determining that insurers' losses from COVID-19 lockdowns were covered by reinsurance, highlights key issues on insurance policy wordings, including how to define a "catastrophe" in the context of the pandemic, says Daniel Healy at Brown Rudnick.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Is Imperative This Election Year

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    As the next election nears, the judges involved in the upcoming trials against former President Donald Trump increasingly face political pressures and threats of violence — revealing the urgent need to safeguard judicial independence and uphold the rule of law, says Benes Aldana at the National Judicial College.

  • Series

    Riding My Peloton Bike Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Using the Peloton platform for cycling, running, rowing and more taught me that fostering a mind-body connection will not only benefit you physically and emotionally, but also inspire stamina, focus, discipline and empathy in your legal career, says Christopher Ward at Polsinelli.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

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    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • EU Inquiry Offers First Insight Into Foreign Subsidy Law

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    The European Commission's first in-depth investigation under the Foreign Subsidies Regulation into a public procurement process, and subsequent brief on regulatory trends, sheds light on the commission's approach to such cases, as well as jurisdictional, procedural and substantive issues under the regulation, says Matthew Hall at McGuireWoods.

  • Assessing 2 Years Of High Court's Arbitration Waiver Ruling

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    In the two years since the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Morgan v. Sundance, clarifying that no special rules apply to waiver of arbitration provisions, the ruling has had immediate ramifications in federal courts, but it may take some time for the effects to be felt on other federal issues and in state courts, say attorneys at Norton Rose.

  • In Int'l Arbitration Agreements, Be Clear About Governing Law

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    A trilogy of recent cases in the English High Court and Court of Appeal highlight the importance of parties agreeing to explicit choice of law language at the outset of an arbitration agreement in order to avoid costly legal skirmishes down the road, say lawyers at Faegre Drinker.

  • What Recent Study Shows About AI's Promise For Legal Tasks

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    Amid both skepticism and excitement about the promise of generative artificial intelligence in legal contexts, the first randomized controlled trial studying its impact on basic lawyering tasks shows mixed but promising results, and underscores the need for attorneys to proactively engage with AI, says Daniel Schwarcz at University of Minnesota Law School.

  • 3 Notification Pitfalls To Avoid With Arbitration Provisions

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    In Lipsett v. Popular Bank, the Second Circuit found that a bank's arbitration provision was unenforceable due to insufficient notice to a customer that he was bound by the agreement, highlighting the importance of adequate communication of arbitration provisions, and customers' options for opting out, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Opinion

    9th Circ. Nazi Art Theft Ruling Is Bad For Repatriation Cases

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    The Ninth Circuit’s recent decision in Cassirer v. Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection Foundation, holding that a Spanish museum doesn't have to return a Nazi-stolen painting to the original Jewish owners, spells trouble for future heirloom repatriation cases, which hinge on similar archaic laws, say Andrea Perez and Josh Sherman at Carrington Coleman.

  • Business Litigators Have A Source Of Untapped Fulfillment

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    As increasing numbers of attorneys struggle with stress and mental health issues, business litigators can find protection against burnout by remembering their important role in society — because fulfillment in one’s work isn’t just reserved for public interest lawyers, say Bennett Rawicki and Peter Bigelow at Hilgers Graben.

  • Series

    Skiing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    A lifetime of skiing has helped me develop important professional skills, and taught me that embracing challenges with a spirit of adventure can allow lawyers to push boundaries, expand their capabilities and ultimately excel in their careers, says Andrea Przybysz at Tucker Ellis.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Forget Everything You Know About IRAC

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    The mode of legal reasoning most students learn in law school, often called “Issue, Rule, Application, Conclusion,” or IRAC, erroneously frames analysis as a separate, discrete step, resulting in disorganized briefs and untold obfuscation — but the fix is pretty simple, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • How Firms Can Ensure Associate Gender Parity Lasts

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    Among associates, women now outnumber men for the first time, but progress toward gender equality at the top of the legal profession remains glacially slow, and firms must implement time-tested solutions to ensure associates’ gender parity lasts throughout their careers, say Kelly Culhane and Nicole Joseph at Culhane Meadows.

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