Intellectual Property

  • April 11, 2024

    Judge Tells USPTO To Hand Over 'Expanded' Panels List

    A Virginia federal judge has ordered the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to hand over a list the agency once made of how many Patent Trial and Appeal Board proceedings went before "expanded" panels, a practice that has since been abandoned.

  • April 11, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Blocks Alvogen Generic Of Bausch Diarrhea Drug

    The Federal Circuit upheld a decision Thursday that prevents Alvogen from releasing a generic version of Bausch Health's blockbuster diarrhea and brain disease drug Xifaxan until 2029, rejecting Alvogen's bid to launch sooner because it was cleared of infringing some patents.

  • April 11, 2024

    Fed. Circ. OKs Samsung, Apple Wins Over Mobile Magnets IP

    The Federal Circuit on Thursday signed off on various rulings that both Samsung and Apple had won at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board against a Texas outfit that claims to have developed a way of using magnets to keep mobile devices in place as well as a way of cleaning their screens.

  • April 11, 2024

    Judge Invalidates Software Patents Over Generic Parts

    A Nebraska federal judge ruled Thursday that agricultural software developer AGI Suretrack's claims for a series of software hardware patents were too abstract to be valid.

  • April 11, 2024

    AG Asked To Weigh In On Jack Daniel's TM Dispute

    An Arizona federal judge has certified a constitutional question from VIP Products LLC asking U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland whether the First Amendment supports the Lanham Act provision authorizing injunctive relief in cases of trademark dilution by tarnishment.

  • April 11, 2024

    Pool Co. Gets Rival's Assets Frozen After False Ads Verdict

    A North Carolina federal judge on Thursday temporarily froze the assets of a Chinese manufacturer of pool products and its American subsidiary after they were hit with a multimillion-dollar verdict for false advertising and unfair business practices, citing a concern they may move assets to try and duck payment.

  • April 11, 2024

    NPE Patent Suits Up 24% In First Quarter Of 2024

    Patent lawsuits from nonpracticing entities are on the rise yet again, with many being filed in the Eastern District of Texas, according to a new report.

  • April 11, 2024

    11th Circ. Denies Atty DQ Bid From Gold Star Wives

    The Eleventh Circuit on Thursday denied a request from Gold Star Wives of America Inc. to disqualify an attorney representing a former president of the organization in an appeal over a trademark suit settlement, rejecting its argument that the lawyer's time serving the group should prevent him from guiding its former leader.

  • April 11, 2024

    Inventor Says AI Art Merits Copyright Despite US Gov't Stance

    An artificial intelligence inventor has bashed the U.S. Copyright Office's arguments that art created by his AI system is not copyrightable because the machine is not human, telling the D.C. Circuit that the government cannot overcome the fact that the work exists, it's original and it qualifies for registration, regardless of its origin.

  • April 11, 2024

    Jury Frees Urban Outfitters From Trade Secrets Suit

    Urban Outfitters on Thursday beat back a lawsuit from a bankrupt online fashion rental company claiming the retailer stole its proprietary information to set up a competing business, with a Philadelphia federal jury finding that the clothing chain did not misappropriate trade secrets.

  • April 10, 2024

    Pfizer Unit Cuts $39M Deal Ending Effexor Antitrust Claims

    A proposed class of direct buyers asked a New Jersey federal judge on Tuesday to approve a $39 million settlement to end allegations that Pfizer Inc. unit Wyeth engaged in a scheme with Teva Pharmaceuticals to delay generic competition for the antidepressant drug Effexor XR.

  • April 10, 2024

    USPTO Outlines Possible Pitfalls For Attorneys Using AI

    The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Wednesday detailed risks facing attorneys using artificial intelligence, warning that they must ensure that filings are accurate and humans played a role in inventions, which attorneys say illustrates that ethical rules are unchanged in the AI era.

  • April 10, 2024

    Gaming Rivals To Settle Patent Fight After $42.9M Verdict In Calif.

    Skillz Platform Inc. and AviaGames Inc. have told a California federal court that they will settle a suit over mobile gaming, months after Skillz won $42.9 million in its patent infringement fight against its rival.

  • April 10, 2024

    Dems Introduce Bill To Codify Policy Barring Judge Shopping

    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., along with 37 other Democratic and two independent senators, introduced legislation on Wednesday to codify the new Judicial Conference of the United States policy against judge shopping after pushback from Republicans and a Texas court.

  • April 10, 2024

    PTAB Will Review Pantech IP Soon After $10M Trial Win

    LG Electronics has persuaded the Patent Trial and Appeal Board to review whether a pair of Pantech Wireless patents are invalid, just over a week after Pantech won a $10 million infringement verdict against OnePlus over similar technology.

  • April 10, 2024

    UGG, Wal-Mart Ordered To File More Details On Slipper Patent

    A California federal judge has ordered Deckers Outdoor Corp. and Wal-Mart Inc. to submit joint briefing on claim construction for an UGG slipper design patent that Deckers alleges the big-box retailer is infringing, saying there is insufficient information for the court to make a decision on summary judgment.

  • April 10, 2024

    Plastic Surgeon Owes $7.7M From Offshore Scheme, US Says

    A now-retired plastic surgeon owes the Internal Revenue Service more than $7.7 million after he ran an offshore employee leasing scheme and he and his wife transferred nearly all their assets to their then-11-year-old daughter, who is now a lawyer, the government told an Ohio federal court.

  • April 10, 2024

    Amazon Hit With $525M Verdict Over Data Storage Patents

    An Illinois federal jury on Wednesday found that Amazon infringed three of a Chicago software company's patents relating to cloud data storage technology, determining that while the infringement was not willful, Amazon owes $525 million in damages.

  • April 10, 2024

    Congress Ponders IP Protections For Human-AI Creations

    A U.S. House of Representatives panel examining intellectual property rights for works made with artificial intelligence grappled Wednesday with where to draw the line on how much human input should be required for creations to receive protections.

  • April 10, 2024

    Pharmacy Gets Eli Lilly's Mounjaro Suit Tossed

    A Florida federal judge has thrown out Eli Lilly & Co.'s suit accusing an online pharmacy of wrongly selling a compounded version of its drug Mounjaro, saying Eli Lilly was "using state law to enforce the terms of" federal law.

  • April 10, 2024

    Justices Asked To Ban FCA Suits Relying On Patent Reviews

    Valeant Pharmaceuticals is going to the U.S. Supreme Court to argue that information cited in Patent Trial and Appeal Board reviews cannot later be used by whistleblowers in False Claims Act lawsuits.

  • April 10, 2024

    'Woodstock' Rivals Set To Test Weed-Adjacent Marks At Trial

    The promoter of the famed 1969 Woodstock music fair sparred Wednesday in Manhattan federal court with an alleged usurper of its prospective right to Woodstock trademarks in the evolving marijuana market, with a jury set to hear the strangely postured dispute.

  • April 10, 2024

    Moderna Says Pfizer Is PTAB 'Tea-Leaf-Reading' In Vax IP Row

    Moderna Inc. asked a Boston federal judge to deny Pfizer Inc.'s bid to pause a COVID-19 vaccine patent trial while the Patent Trial and Appeal Board reviews the validity of two of the three patents at issue.

  • April 10, 2024

    Maine Says Lobster Boat Tracking Counts As Legal Search

    Maine's top fisheries' regulator is arguing that newly required electronic location tracking for some lobstering boats is a legal administrative search of commercial premises and has urged a federal judge to toss a lawsuit alleging the rule violates lobster fishers' constitutional rights.

  • April 10, 2024

    Merchant & Gould Adds IP Team From Oblon McClelland In DC

    Merchant & Gould has expanded its intellectual property services in Washington, D.C., with the recent addition of a five-person team of attorneys who moved their practices from Oblon McClelland Maier & Neustadt LLP.

Expert Analysis

  • Film Plagiarism Claims May Foreshadow AI Copyright Issues

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    The contentious plagiarism dispute over the Oscar-nominated screenplay for "The Holdovers" may portend the challenges screenwriters will face when attempting to prove copyright infringement against scripts generated by artificial intelligence technology, says Craig Smith at Lando & Anastasi.

  • 4 Ways To Motivate Junior Attorneys To Bring Their Best

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    As Gen Z and younger millennial attorneys increasingly express dissatisfaction with their work and head for the exits, the lawyers who manage them must understand and attend to their needs and priorities to boost engagement and increase retention, says Stacey Schwartz at Katten.

  • The Tricky Implications Of New Calif. Noncompete Laws

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    Two new California noncompete laws that ban certain out-of-state agreements and require employers to notify certain workers raise novel issues related to mergers and acquisitions, and pose particular challenges for technology companies, says John Viola at Thompson Coburn.

  • Patent Ownership Issues In Light Of USPTO AI Guidance

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    Recently published guidance from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office establishes that inventions created using artificial intelligence may be patentable if a human also significantly contributes, but ownership and legal rights in these types of patents are different issues that require further assessment, says Karl Gross at Leydig Voit.

  • Opinion

    Why USPTO Should Issue Inherency Guidance Memo

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    The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office should issue a new guidance memo in regard to the standard for inherency during the examination process, as the standard is frequently misapplied during prosecution, and consistency of the standard in the USPTO should match that in the federal courts, says Irving Feit at Lucas & Mercanti.

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Fears About The End Of Chevron Deference Are Overblown

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    While some are concerned about repercussions if the U.S. Supreme Court brings an end to Chevron deference in the Loper and Relentless cases this term, agencies and attorneys would survive just fine under the doctrines that have already begun to replace it, say Daniel Wolff and Henry Leung at Crowell & Moring.

  • How Suit Over An AI George Carlin May Lead To Legislation

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    George Carlin’s estate recently sued a company over an artificial intelligence-generated podcast allegedly impersonating the late comedian, highlighting the importance of much-needed state and federal protection against unauthorized representations of an individual’s image in the time of AI, say Anna Chauvet and Maxime Jarquin at Finnegan.

  • Parsing Chinese Governance On AI-Generated Content

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    As essential risk-mitigation, companies with a China reach should be aware of recent developments in Chinese oversight of AI-generated content, including the latest rulings and regulations as well as the updated ambit for supervisory bodies, say Jet Deng and Ken Dai at Dacheng.

  • Negotiating Milestones In Pharma Licenses Requires Care

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    For life sciences companies, understanding the unique issues that arise in licensing agreements' milestone payment provisions can increase the likelihood and amount of payments received by the licensor and ensure payments are carefully and closely tied to events that truly drive value for the licensee, say Edward Angelini at Amneal Pharmaceutical and Lori Waldron at Sills Cummis.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • Trending At The PTAB: How Q1 Policymaking Affects Practice

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    Attorneys at Finnegan consider the first quarter's U.S. Patent and Trademark Office policymaking initiatives and how they may affect practice before the PTAB, including a rule that would codify the current pilot program that allows patent owners two opportunities to amend the challenged claims.

  • Stay Interviews Are Key To Retaining Legal Talent

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    Even as the economy shifts and layoffs continue, law firms still want to retain their top attorneys, and so-called stay interviews — informal conversations with employees to identify potential issues before they lead to turnover — can be a crucial tool for improving retention and morale, say Tina Cohen Nicol and Kate Reder Sheikh at Major Lindsey.

  • Direct Claims Ruling May Alter Gov't Ties To Software Firms

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    A recent Federal Circuit decision allowing a software developer to pursue legal action under the Contract Disputes Act could change the government's relationship with commercial software providers by permitting direct claims, even in third-party purchase situations, say Dan Ramish and Zach Prince at Haynes Boone.

  • The Fed. Circ. In February: A Reminder On Procedure Rule 28

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    Because the Federal Circuit does not often issue a sua sponte precedential order emphasizing an important rule of practice, it is useful to look at how the court applied the restrictions of appellate procedure Rule 28 in Promptu v. Comcast last month, and in cases that preceded it, say Jeremiah Helm and Sean Murray at Knobbe Martens.

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