Massachusetts

  • March 22, 2024

    Ex-Drug Rep Won't Serve More Time After 1st Circ. Victory

    The second sentencing of a former Aegerion Pharmaceuticals Inc. salesman did not add a day in prison to the roughly seven months he served before the First Circuit wiped away his initial conviction on charges he schemed to fraudulently sell the company's cholesterol treatment.

  • March 22, 2024

    Jewish MIT Grad Students Hit Union With EEOC Bias Charges

    Four Jewish graduate students at Massachusetts Institute of Technology filed religious discrimination charges with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission alleging their union illegally refused to let them withdraw from the labor group after they raised concerns about what they called its antisemitic leanings.

  • March 22, 2024

    Polsinelli Adds In-House Biotech IP Atty In Boston

    An experienced in-house biotechnology attorney has joined Polsinelli PC's intellectual property department as counsel in Boston.

  • March 21, 2024

    Pot Co. Seller Says Chancery Must Decide Curaleaf Dispute

    A court needs to determine which corporate records Curaleaf Holdings Inc. should turn over in its $13 million price adjustment dispute with the seller of a multistate cannabis dispensary before it goes before an independent accountant, the seller told Delaware's Court of Chancery on Thursday.

  • March 21, 2024

    Exxon Wants Mass. Oil Purchase Docs In Greenwashing Suit

    The Massachusetts attorney general's office told a judge Thursday that Exxon Mobil Corp. is attempting to relitigate already-barred defenses in an alleged "greenwashing" case by seeking documents from at least a dozen state agencies, including ones concerning decisions by those agencies to purchase the energy company's products.

  • March 21, 2024

    FERC Nominees Carefully Walk Climate Line In Senate Hearing

    Federal Energy Regulatory Commission nominees on Thursday told a U.S. Senate panel that the agency isn't a climate change regulator, but they didn't close the door on FERC ever considering climate impacts in its decision making either.

  • March 21, 2024

    Meet The Bar Vet And 'Good Listener' Picked For Mass. Bench

    With a resume that ranges from a stint as a public defender to work on a multibillion-dollar Ponzi scheme suit, the Biden administration's latest pick for the Massachusetts federal bench has impressed former colleagues with his experience and sound temperament — even his mathematical chops.

  • March 21, 2024

    The LA Boutique Repping MLB's Ohtani Amid Betting Scandal

    An unfolding sports betting scandal has prompted Los Angeles Dodgers superstar Shohei Ohtani to lawyer up, enlisting the West Hollywood boutique Berk Brettler LLP to advise him in a saga that has already led the club to fire his longtime interpreter.

  • March 21, 2024

    Pot Co. Owner Argues To Keep Md. Social Equity Suit Alive

    The owner of a cannabis shop hoping to operate in Maryland is asking a federal judge to reject the state regulator's bid to dismiss a suit challenging the state's social equity licensing law, arguing the Constitution's dormant commerce clause applies to the cannabis trade and preempts state-based licensing requirements.

  • March 20, 2024

    Biden Taps Judicial Nominees For 6th Circuit, SDNY

    President Joe Biden on Wednesday unveiled a new slate of judicial nominations, including a current U.S. attorney tapped for a Sixth Circuit seat and another federal prosecutor up for a judgeship in the Southern District of New York.

  • March 20, 2024

    PTAB To Analyze Moderna COVID Vaccine Patents

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board has agreed to review two Moderna COVID-19 vaccine patents challenged by rivals Pfizer and BioNTech as having "unimaginably broad claims directed to a basic idea that was known long before."

  • March 20, 2024

    Republican Bill Targets Colleges Hiring Unauthorized Workers

    Sen. J.D. Vance, R-Ohio, and Rep. Jim Banks, R-Ind., have introduced legislation to prevent universities that receive federal funding from hiring unauthorized immigrants.

  • March 20, 2024

    RI Ex-Broker Gets 8 Years In Ponzi Scheme

     A Rhode Island man was sentenced to eight years in prison for running a decade-long Ponzi scheme to defraud investors and to evade his taxes.

  • March 20, 2024

    How The Supreme Court Could Narrow Chevron

    After hours of oral argument in a closely watched administrative law case, it appeared that some U.S. Supreme Court justices could be open to limiting the opportunities for lower courts to defer to federal agencies' legal interpretations in disputes over rulemaking — and legal experts said there are a number of ways they could do it.

  • March 20, 2024

    Breaking Down Each State's Climate Priority Policies

    Forty-five states have now completed climate action plans outlining how they'll advance federal climate goals through policy and programs in coming years, with most focusing at least in part on real estate development as a way to reduce emissions.

  • March 20, 2024

    2 Biotechs Unveil Separate Fundings Totaling $325M

    Life sciences companies Clasp Therapeutics and Cooley-advised Capstan Therapeutics, which develop treatments for a range of health conditions including cancer and autoimmune diseases, separately announced funding rounds Wednesday that together total $325 million.

  • March 20, 2024

    Law360 Announces The Members Of Its 2024 Editorial Boards

    Law360 is pleased to announce the formation of its 2024 Editorial Advisory Boards.

  • March 20, 2024

    US Chamber's Litigation Funding Concerns Spur 2 State Laws

    Amid concerns from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce about third-party litigation funding, including from potentially hostile foreign entities, state legislatures in Indiana and West Virginia have recently passed bills imposing restrictions on the practice.

  • March 19, 2024

    Hydro Co. Asks FERC To Redo Tribe Opposition Permit Denial

    A Massachusetts company pursuing hydroelectric projects on Navajo Nation land is asking the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to revisit an order that denied preliminary permits because the nation opposed them, maintaining it has secured support from tribal entities to show otherwise — an assertion the nation's attorney general disputes.

  • March 19, 2024

    Fishers Angle For Justices' Attention With New Monument Suit

    Two fishermen are challenging a 5,000-square-mile offshore national monument in a lawsuit that sets up a fight over the extent of presidential power under the Antiquities Act, an issue that has already drawn the attention of U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts.

  • March 19, 2024

    States Converge On Texas' Challenge To EPA Methane Rule

    A California-led coalition of Democratic attorneys general wants to defend new federal limits on oil and gas industry methane emissions challenged by Texas, Oklahoma and other conservative states, with supporters of the new rules claiming a sovereign interest in protecting their citizens from harmful greenhouse gas pollution.

  • March 19, 2024

    Vicente LLP Sues Recruiter Over Fee Demand In Failed Search

    Vicente LLP is alleging that a Florida-based recruiter wants money for nothing after a failed search for a corporate attorney to join the cannabis law firm, during which one of the two proposed candidates turned out to be someone Vicente already worked with and later hired in a different role.

  • March 19, 2024

    Nixed JetBlue-Spirit Deal Moots Antitrust Case, 1st Circ. Told

    The abandonment of JetBlue Airways Corp. and Spirit Airways Inc.'s $3.8 billion merger following a successful U.S. Department of Justice legal challenge moots a separate antitrust suit by air travelers seeking to block the tie-up, the airlines have argued to the First Circuit.

  • March 18, 2024

    SEC Fines Supervisor $47K Over Revenue Inflation Claims

    A former finance director of water treatment company Evoqua Water Technologies Corp. will pay the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission nearly $47,000 to resolve claims that he was part of a scheme to inflate the company's revenue by $36 million.

  • March 18, 2024

    Ex-Immigration Judges Say Mistake Warrants Asylum Redo

    Dozens of former immigration judges pressed the First Circuit to grant a second shot at asylum for a Salvadoran woman fearing gang violence, saying an immigration judge had erred by not asking her if she belonged to an asylum-eligible community. 

Expert Analysis

  • A Former Bankruptcy Judge Talks 2023 High Court Rulings

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    In 2023, the U.S. Supreme Court issued four bankruptcy law opinions — an extraordinary number — and a close look at these cases signals that changes to the U.S. Bankruptcy Code will have to come from Congress, not the courts, says Phillip Shefferly at the University of Michigan Law School.

  • Series

    Children's Book Writing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Becoming a children's book author has opened doors to incredible new experiences of which I barely dared to dream, but the process has also changed my life by serving as a reminder that strong writing, networking and public speaking skills are hugely beneficial to a legal career, says Shaunna Bailey at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Benefits Limitations Period Ruling Carries ERISA Implications

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    The First Circuit's recent decision in Smith v. Prudential — over enforcing a benefits claim limitations period that expires before the claim accrued — has ramifications for Employee Income Security Act cases, where limitations issues can arise in the termination of ongoing benefit payments rather than an initial application for benefits, says Mark DeBofsky at DeBofsky Law.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • Lessons From This Year's Landmark Green Energy IP Clash

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    In this year's Siemens v. General Electric wind turbine patent dispute, a Massachusetts federal court offers a cautionary tale against willful infringement, and highlights the balance between innovation, law and ethics, as legal battles like this become more frequent in the renewable energy sector, say John Powell and Andrew Siuta at Sunstein.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • Expect CFPB Flex Over Large Nonbank Payment Cos.

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    A recent enforcement action and a new rule proposal from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau indicate a growing focus on the nonbank payment ecosystem, especially larger participants, in 2024, say Felix Shipkevich and Jessica Livingston at Shipkevich.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • Rockport Ch. 11 Highlights Global Settlement Considerations

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    A Delaware bankruptcy court’s recent rejection of Rockport’s proposed settlement serves as a reminder that there is a risk that a global settlement executed outside of a plan may be rejected as a sub rosa plan, but shouldn’t dissuade parties from seeking relief when applicable case law supports approval, says Kyle Arendsen at Squire Patton.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • 'Manufacturing' Amid Mass. Adoption Of Single-Sales Factor

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    Massachusetts’ recent adoption of single-sales-factor apportionment will benefit companies that have a greater in-state physical presence, reinforce the importance of understanding market-sourcing rules, and reduce the manufacturing classification's importance to tax apportionment, though the classification continues to be significant to other aspects of taxation, say attorneys at McDermott.

  • 1st Circ. Ruling Helps Clarify Test For FLSA Admin Exemption

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    The First Circuit’s recent decision in Marcus v. American Contract Bridge League will help employers navigate the Fair Labor Standards Act's "general business operations" exemption and make the crucial and often confusing decision of whether white collar employees are overtime-exempt administrators or nonexempt frontline producers of products and services, says Mark Tabakman at Fox Rothschild.

  • How Cannabis Cos. Are Adapting In Shifting Bankruptcy Arena

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    Recent bankruptcy cases show that federal courts have begun to demonstrate more openness to downstream businesses in the cannabis industry, and that even though receivership can be a viable option for those denied access to the bankruptcy system, it is not without its own risks and complexities, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

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