Michigan

  • February 26, 2024

    Clement, Prelogar Odd Bedfellows In Social Media Showdown

    After GOP-led states targeted perceived stifling of conservative voices on social media, Monday's oral arguments at the U.S. Supreme Court could have featured predictable partisan fissures. But the case instead illustrated that legal ideology in the digital age is sometimes surprising.

  • February 26, 2024

    Justices Say Social Media Speech Laws Pose 'Land Mines'

    The U.S. Supreme Court seemed skeptical Monday of the constitutionality of Florida and Texas laws prohibiting social media platforms from removing content or users based on viewpoint, but struggled with whether the still-developing records in the lawsuits challenging the regulations could support a meaningful ruling on platforms' First Amendment rights.

  • February 26, 2024

    UAW, Fiat Chrysler Escape Engineers' Bribery Scheme Suit

    The United Auto Workers, Fiat Chrysler and others are off the hook for state fraud and civil conspiracy claims brought by auto engineers in connection to a bribery scheme between union officials and the automaker, a Michigan federal judge ruled Monday, citing a recent Sixth Circuit decision finding related allegations untimely.

  • February 26, 2024

    Mich. Justices Told Case Deadlines Tied To Litigants' Rights

    A property management company has told the Michigan Supreme Court it should reaffirm that case filing deadlines are "substantive" policy matters because they are essential to litigants' right to be free from stale claims, as the court is expected to decide whether it improperly extended a grace period to filers during the pandemic. 

  • February 26, 2024

    6th Circ. Sanctions Prison Co. For Not Disclosing Asset Info

    A Sixth Circuit panel has held a Federal Bureau of Prisons contractor in contempt for its "woefully inadequate" efforts to turn over financial records to the National Labor Relations Board as ordered, in a dispute over two fired union supporters' back pay.

  • February 26, 2024

    Mich. Judge Vacates Award For Fund's $40M Liability Claim

    An arbitrator must again review a dispute over a union pension fund's claim that a demolition company owed more than $40 million in withdrawal liability, a Michigan federal judge ruled, vacating the arbitration award because evidence didn't back conclusions about the number of labor contracts involved.

  • February 26, 2024

    Mich. Tribunal Grants Property Tax Break For Youth Ranch

    A Michigan youth group home satisfied the legal tests for a charitable organization eligible for a property tax exemption, the Michigan Tax Tribunal said, rejecting a local township's findings.

  • February 24, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Social Media Laws & Bump Stocks

    The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments related to three big-ticket cases this week in a pair of First Amendment challenges to Florida and Texas laws prohibiting social media platforms from removing content or users based on their viewpoints and a dispute over the federal government's authority to ban bump stocks.

  • February 23, 2024

    Mich. Panel Lets Truck Co.'s Win Stand In Age Bias Suit

    A Michigan appeals court has refused to reinstate a former truck company employee's lawsuit alleging she was fired because she was in her 50s and flagged a health issue, saying she failed to rebut the company's argument that she was let go because it no longer had work for her.

  • February 23, 2024

    Mich. Ex-Judge Disbarred For Sending Explicit Texts To Client

    A former Michigan state chief judge was disbarred after he sent sexually explicit text messages to a client, encouraged that client to drink while they were on probation, and practiced while his license was suspended following a drunk driving plea.

  • February 23, 2024

    Christian Clinic Says Trans Surgery Suit Bolsters Mich. Fears

    A Michigan clinic fighting to show it can challenge a state civil rights law it claims would force it to care for transgender patients told the Sixth Circuit that a suit targeting a Colorado children's hospital that stopped providing surgeries for transgender patients underscores how it could come under fire as well. 

  • February 23, 2024

    Agent Didn't Owe Mich. Co. Coverage Advice, Panel Says

    An insurance agent did not have a duty to advise a business that was damaged in a 2020 dam collapse that its insurance coverage might be inadequate, a Michigan state appeals court ruled, finding there is no special relationship between the parties that triggered that responsibility.

  • February 23, 2024

    6th Circ. Backs DOL's Black Lung Benefits Award For Miner

    The Sixth Circuit stood by an administrative law judge's ruling that a former coal miner is entitled to black lung benefits even if his long history of smoking might have also contributed to his pneumoconiosis, denying a petition for review from the man's former employer.

  • February 22, 2024

    Ruling In Mich. GOP Leadership Spat May Land Tuesday

    A Michigan state judge said Thursday he might issue a preliminary ruling next week in the litigation over which faction is entitled to control the Michigan Republican Party, days before competing presidential primary caucuses that were scheduled by the two rivals each claiming to be the party's leader.

  • February 22, 2024

    UAW Tells Mich. Judge To Toss Fiduciary Duty Suit

    The United Auto Workers and one of its affiliates urged a Michigan federal judge to dismiss accusations that the union violated its fiduciary duty in connection with an individual's claim for benefits, saying federal retirement and labor laws preempt the plaintiff's allegations.

  • February 22, 2024

    Mich. Judge OKs $52M Deal For Mayo Foundation Subscribers

    A Michigan federal judge on Wednesday gave the initial approval to a $52 million deal for subscribers to the Mayo Foundation's health magazine who allege the publisher shared their private information without consent.

  • February 22, 2024

    Wolverine Wants Judgment, Sanctions In PFAS Coverage Row

    Footwear company Wolverine asked a Michigan federal court Thursday to grant it a win and impose additional sanctions against its insurer for continued "flagrant disregard and willful disobedience of discovery orders" in a dispute over coverage of PFAS chemical injury suits that may set the tone for similar litigation.

  • February 22, 2024

    Chamber, Biz Groups Fight Class Cert. In GM Defect Suit

    Automotive and product manufacturer associations on Wednesday sided with General Motors in seeking to reverse the certification of 26 classes of drivers who allege the automaker sold vehicles with defective transmissions, saying allowing classes to include uninjured drivers would create billions of dollars in unnecessary litigation.

  • February 22, 2024

    Ex-Mich. Judge May Lose Law License Loss Challenge

    A Michigan magistrate judge recommended the dismissal of a former judge's suit alleging the state's judicial disciplinary board defamed her by denying the reinstatement of her law license.

  • February 22, 2024

    Taft Stettinius Adds 6 Dinsmore Attys In Detroit, Chicago

    Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP has hired six attorneys from Dinsmore & Shohl LLP who focus their practices on business law and litigation matters.

  • February 21, 2024

    GM Bolt Buyers' Attys Blasted For 'Wasting' Judge's Time

    A California federal judge on Wednesday scolded lawyers who filed about 150 "cookie cutter" lawsuits alleging General Motors knowingly sold Chevrolet Bolt electric vehicles with defective batteries, asking why they shouldn't be sanctioned for "wasting" court time as claims for some model years will have to be withdrawn.

  • February 21, 2024

    39 AGs Call For Federal Pharmacy Benefit Manager Reform

    The list of critics of pharmacy benefit managers continues to grow as nearly 40 attorneys general have thrown their weight behind a trio of federal bills they say would force more transparency into an "opaque" industry that has "been a cause of rising drug prices."

  • February 21, 2024

    Tribes, Mich., Feds Refute Great Lakes Fishing Challenge

    Several Native American tribes, the state of Michigan and the federal government have urged the Sixth Circuit to reject a sport fishing group's attempt to sink a tribal fishing pact for parts of lakes Huron, Michigan and Superior, arguing it strikes an appropriate balance between respecting tribal fishing rights and protecting the Great Lakes fisheries.

  • February 21, 2024

    Auto Giants Can't Pause Neo Tech Patent MDL

    A Michigan federal judge said Tuesday he wouldn't stay multidistrict litigation by Neo Wireless alleging multiple auto companies infringed its in-vehicle cellular technology while the automakers wait for reviews of the underlying patents, saying a pause now would just delay the cases' return to their original courts.

  • February 21, 2024

    Irish Pub Chain's Ex-CFO Gets 1.5 Years For $1M Tax Fraud

    The former chief financial officer of a pub chain with more than a dozen Irish-themed restaurants was sentenced to one and a half years in prison Wednesday by an Ohio federal court for his role in a bookkeeping scheme that defrauded eight states of $1 million in sales taxes.

Expert Analysis

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • 5 Lessons For SaaS Companies After Blackbaud Data Breach

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    Looking at the enforcement actions that software-as-a-service provider Blackbaud resolved with state attorneys general, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the Federal Trade Commission in the past year can help SaaS companies manage these increasingly common forms of data breaches, say attorneys at Orrick.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: February Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses five notable circuit court decisions on topics from property taxes to veteran's rights — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including class representative intervention, wage-and-hour dispute evidence and ascertainability requirements.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • 6th Circ. Ruling Breathes New Life Into Article III Traceability

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    The Sixth Circuit's recent decision in Hardwick v. 3M Co. to vacate a district court's certification of one of the largest class actions in American jurisprudence for lack of Article III standing has potentially broader implications for class action practice in the product liability sphere, particularly in medical monitoring cases involving far-fetched theories of causation, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • What's At Stake In High Court NLRB Injunction Case

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    William Baker at Wigdor examines the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision to hear Starbucks v. McKinney — where it will consider a long-standing circuit split over the standard for evaluating National Labor Relations Board injunction bids — and explains why the justices’ eventual decision, either way, is unlikely to be a significant blow to labor.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • 1869 Case May Pave Off-Ramp For Justices In Trump DQ Fight

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    In deciding whether former President Donald Trump is disqualified from Colorado's Republican primary ballots, the U.S. Supreme Court could rely on due process principles articulated in a Reconstruction-era case to avert a chaotic or undemocratic outcome, says Gordon Renneisen at Cornerstone Law Group.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

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