Michigan

  • March 15, 2024

    Detroit Tigers Can't Shut Out Ex-Worker's Age Bias Suit

    A Michigan federal judge said Friday a jury should hear a 58-year-old former Detroit Tigers clubhouse manager's claims that he was fired because of his age, pointing to a record that could show his boss had a pattern of replacing older workers with younger ones.

  • March 15, 2024

    Justices Craft Test To Decide If Social Media Use Is Official

    The U.S. Supreme Court adopted a new test Friday to determine if a public official's social media use constitutes state action subject to liability under the First Amendment, instructing courts to consider whether the official had authority to speak on the government's behalf and whether they purported to do so in the challenged action.

  • March 14, 2024

    GM, LexisNexis Sued For Sharing Driving Data With Insurers

    A Florida driver claims his insurance rate doubled because General Motors and its OnStar unit collected driving data through his Cadillac without permission and shared the information with LexisNexis Risk Solutions, which created a vague driving behavior report that insurance companies use to determine coverage, according to a putative federal class action.

  • March 14, 2024

    'Secret Meeting' Settlement OK Draws Mich. Justices' Scrutiny

    A Michigan Supreme Court justice expressed discomfort Thursday with the idea that government officials could ratify a settlement in a closed-door meeting without consequences, in a case brought by three insurers against a county government's road agency trying to back out of a settlement to which it says it never agreed. 

  • March 14, 2024

    FTC Says Consolidation Endangering Infant-Formula Market

    The Federal Trade Commission has found the country's small number of baby formula manufacturers and the effects of a federal nutrition program contributed to shortages in 2022 and are still making the supply chain vulnerable to disruption.

  • March 14, 2024

    Atty Evading Warrant Fights Fingerprinting In Election Case

    A Michigan attorney refusing to turn herself in after missing a hearing in a criminal case alleging that she tampered with voting machines urged a state appellate court Wednesday to halt the proceedings against her, saying the trial court's demand that she get fingerprinted violates her privacy.

  • March 14, 2024

    Mich. AG Taps Enviro, Regulatory Chiefs As Deputy AGs

    The Michigan Attorney General's Office on Wednesday announced the promotions of two division heads to deputies and the creation of new criminal divisions to focus on victims' services and conviction integrity.

  • March 14, 2024

    Ford Slammed For Bid To 'Sidestep' Faulty Axle-Bolt Suit

    Two Washington SUV owners suing Ford for allegedly slacking on safety in newer Explorer models have accused the vehicle maker of trying to "sidestep liability" in their proposed class action by pointing to two recalls that didn't address the design flaw at issue.

  • March 14, 2024

    Most States Fall Short In Disclosing Justices' Finance Reports

    The vast majority of state supreme courts make it exceedingly difficult for the public to get information about justices' financial entanglements, and the information they do give out is often scant at best, according to a report released Thursday.

  • March 14, 2024

    Whirlpool Can't Toss Defect Suit Over Ice Buildup In Fridges

    A California federal judge has declined to throw out a putative class action claiming Whirlpool hid a defect in its refrigerators that led to cooling failures due to frost buildup, finding the suit sufficiently alleged Whirlpool knew of the problem since it issued technical service pointers noting customers could possibly experience buildup.

  • March 13, 2024

    6th Circ. Kills Orders On Calculating Delivery Driver Costs

    A Sixth Circuit panel has swept away rulings from courts in two separate states — one that sided with pizza delivery drivers and another that sided with the restaurants — over how drivers should be reimbursed for using their cars to make deliveries, saying they both got it wrong.

  • March 13, 2024

    Mich. Justice Torn Over 'Unfairness' Of Law In Treadmill Suit

    A Michigan Supreme Court justice on Wednesday seemed sympathetic to the plight of a woman who was injured when she fell off a treadmill because federal court proceedings affected her ability to timely bring state claims but said he didn't think the state's top court could tackle the likely legislative issue.

  • March 13, 2024

    Versata Wants Axed $105M Ford Verdict Revived Or Expanded

    Versata Software has urged the Federal Circuit to undo a Michigan federal judge's decision erasing a nearly $105 million trade secrets and breach of contract verdict it won against Ford, and argued that it was wrongly barred from presenting damages theories seeking up to $1.3 billion.

  • March 13, 2024

    Atty Who Skipped Vote-Tampering Hearing Can't Ditch Warrant

    A Michigan judge on Wednesday urged counsel for a lawyer evading a bench warrant to direct his client to turn herself in, rejecting claims previous counsel didn't adequately inform her of a hearing she skipped in a case where she's alleged to have tampered with voting machines after the 2020 election.

  • March 13, 2024

    Mich. Justices Open To Counties' Foreclosure Liability Fears

    Two members of the Michigan Supreme Court seemed sympathetic to Michigan counties urging the court to limit their liability for holding onto surplus tax foreclosure proceeds, highlighting during oral arguments that counties were following state law in a practice that was later deemed unconstitutional.

  • March 13, 2024

    6th Circ. Told Woman Helped Life Partner Avoid $3M In Taxes

    The federal government justifiably sold off the property of a woman who paid for it with money from her dead long-term life partner, the U.S. government told the Sixth Circuit on Wednesday, saying the purchase helped her partner skirt more than $3 million in tax liabilities.

  • March 13, 2024

    Flint Found In Contempt Over Lead Pipe Replacement Delays

    A Michigan federal judge has found the city of Flint in contempt for dragging its heels on court orders to replace the city's lead pipes after a 2017 settlement, finding that its belated, partial compliance was not enough to avoid the sanction.

  • March 12, 2024

    'Ghost Gun' Co. Sued In Mich. For Selling To Teen Shooter

    A Michigan resident who was shot by his friend with a handgun made using a do-it-yourself kit has sued a leading supplier of so-called ghost gun kits in state court, alleging the company was negligent by allowing a 17-year-old to buy a gun kit without making sure he was legally able to buy a firearm.

  • March 12, 2024

    Detroit Retirees Appeal Pension Gap Funding Pause

    Detroit's retired police and firefighters are appealing a ruling that allowed the city to continue pausing its pension gap funding payments, asking a Michigan federal court to reverse a bankruptcy judge's decision that extended a decade-long funding reprieve to 30 years.

  • March 12, 2024

    Mich. Firms Mishandled $38M Trusts, Suit Says

    A pair of Michigan law firms didn't properly advise the trustee of a construction mogul's trusts worth more than $38 million, leading the trusts to pay excessive attorney fees, lose most of their value and miss out on tax breaks, a special fiduciary tasked with investigating the trusts' handling has alleged.

  • March 12, 2024

    6th Circ. Won't Revive Mich. Mall's Faulty Parking Lot Suit

    A general contractor is not liable for a Michigan parking lot that began to fail "mere months" after construction, the Sixth Circuit said, finding the company did not violate its contract with outlet mall chain Tanger.

  • March 12, 2024

    Pot Co. Says Commerce Clause Meant To Stop 'Trade Wars'

    Cannabis company Peridot Tree WA Inc. is urging a Washington federal judge to reject a bid to dismiss its suit alleging the state's cannabis social equity licensing scheme violates the Constitution's dormant commerce clause, saying the court should find that it applies to cannabis businesses.

  • March 12, 2024

    Detroit Tigers Say Age Bias Suit Should Be Thrown Out

    The Detroit Tigers urged a Michigan federal court to throw out a suit from two former scouts who said they were fired as part of a systemic push to get rid of older employees, saying both men are included in a similar proposed class action in Colorado.

  • March 11, 2024

    Contractor Wants Mich. Judge To Rethink Agreement Order

    A demolition company has urged a Michigan federal judge to reconsider his finding that the number of labor contracts between its parent association and a union fund was ambiguous and needed more thought by an arbitrator, saying evidence on the record shows that the contractor was bound by just one agreement.

  • March 11, 2024

    Injured Bus Rider Gave Up Right To Sue, Mich. Justices Told

    A Detroit public transit authority told the Michigan Supreme Court to affirm that an injured passenger can't pursue the authority for personal injury protection benefits under the state's no-fault law after assigning her right to the benefits to her medical providers.

Expert Analysis

  • Perspectives

    More States Should Join Effort To Close Legal Services Gap

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    Colorado is the most recent state to allow other types of legal providers, not just attorneys, to offer specific services in certain circumstances — and more states should rethink the century-old assumptions that shape our current regulatory rules, say Natalie Anne Knowlton and Janet Drobinske at the University of Denver.

  • Identifying Trends And Tips In Litigation Financing Disclosure

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    Growing interest and controversy in litigation financing raise several salient concerns, but exploring recent compelled disclosure trends from courts around the country can help practitioners further their clients' interests, say Sean Callagy and Samuel Sokolsky at Arnold & Porter.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Elrod On 'Jury Duty'

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    Though the mockumentary series “Jury Duty” features purposely outrageous characters, it offers a solemn lesson about the simple but brilliant design of the right to trial by jury, with an unwitting protagonist who even John Adams may have welcomed as an impartial foreperson, says Fifth Circuit Judge Jennifer Elrod.

  • 4 Business-Building Strategies For Introvert Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Introverted lawyers can build client bases to rival their extroverted peers’ by adapting time-tested strategies for business development that can work for any personality — such as claiming a niche, networking for maximum impact, drawing on existing contacts and more, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • Opinion

    3 Ways Justices' Disclosure Defenses Miss The Ethical Point

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    The rule-bound interpretation of financial disclosures preferred by U.S. Supreme Court Justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas — demonstrated in their respective statements defending their failure to disclose gifts from billionaires — show that they do not understand the ethical aspects of the public's concern, says Jim Moliterno at the Washington and Lee University School of Law.

  • Pending 6th Circ. Ruling Has Broad Class Action Implications

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    If the Sixth Circuit decides in FirstEnergy Corp. Securities Litigation to treat alleged half-truths as omissions for the purposes of class certification, public companies would be exposed to near-automatic class certification in nearly every securities case and would face steeper evidentiary hurdles at the merits stages, say attorneys at Willkie.

  • Rethinking Mich. Slip-And-Fall Defense After Top Court Ruling

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    The Michigan Supreme Court recently overturned three decades of premises liability jurisprudence by ruling that the open and obvious danger defense is no longer part of a traditional duty analysis, posing the question of whether landowners will ever again win on a motion for summary dismissal, say John Stiglich and Meriam Choulagh at Wilson Elser.

  • What Courts' Deference Preference Can Mean For Sentencing

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Vargas decision deepens the split among federal appeals courts on the level of deference afforded to commentary in the U.S. sentencing guidelines — an issue that has major real-life ramifications for defendants, and is likely bound for the U.S. Supreme Court, say Jennifer Freel and Michael Murtha at Jackson Walker.

  • Caregiver Flexibility Is Crucial For Atty Engagement, Retention

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    As the battle for top talent continues post-pandemic, many firms are attempting to attract employees with progressive hybrid working environments — and supporting caregivers before, during and after an extended leave is a critically important way to retain top talent, says Manar Morales at The Diversity & Flexibility Alliance.

  • What To Watch As Justices Take Up Title VII Job Transfer Case

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    With its recent decision to hear Muldrow v. City of St. Louis, the U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to decide whether an involuntary job transfer can count as employment discrimination under Title VII — an eventual ruling that has potential to reshape workplace bias claims nationwide, says Adam Grogan at Bell Law Group.

  • Strategies To Help Clients When BOP Ignores Medical Needs

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    Defense attorneys should cite recent case law and the expanded compassionate release guidelines, effective Nov. 1, when making any post-sentence application to aid incarcerated clients whose medical needs have been neglected by the Federal Bureau of Prisons, says Marissa Kingman at Fox Rothschild.

  • In-Office Engagement Is Essential To Associate Development

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    As law firms develop return-to-office policies that allow hybrid work arrangements, they should incorporate the specific types of in-person engagement likely to help associates develop attributes common among successful firm leaders, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Perspectives

    A Judge's Pitch To Revive The Jury Trial

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    Ohio state Judge Pierre Bergeron explains how the decline of the jury trial threatens public confidence in the judiciary and even democracy as a whole, and he offers ideas to restore this sacred right.

  • How To Recognize And Recover From Lawyer Loneliness

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    Law can be one of the loneliest professions, but there are practical steps that attorneys and their managers can take to help themselves and their peers improve their emotional health, strengthen their social bonds and protect their performance, says psychologist and attorney Traci Cipriano.

  • Opinion

    Litigation Funding Disclosure Should Be Mandatory

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    Despite the Appellate Rules Committee's recent deferral of the issue of requiring third-party litigation funding disclosure, such a mandate is necessary to ensure the even-handed administration of justice across all cases, says David Levitt at Hinshaw.

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