Pennsylvania

  • March 19, 2024

    States Converge On Texas' Challenge To EPA Methane Rule

    A California-led coalition of Democratic attorneys general wants to defend new federal limits on oil and gas industry methane emissions challenged by Texas, Oklahoma and other conservative states, with supporters of the new rules claiming a sovereign interest in protecting their citizens from harmful greenhouse gas pollution.

  • March 19, 2024

    Nippon Steel Tries To Ease Worries Over $14.9B US Steel Deal

    Nippon Steel Corp. pledged to move its North American headquarters to Pennsylvania in an attempt to assure the public that its proposed $14.9 billion acquisition of Pittsburgh-based U.S. Steel will ultimately be good for the domestic steel industry.

  • March 19, 2024

    J&J Says Former Exec Stole Thousands Of Files In Move To Pfizer

    Johnson & Johnson has sued a former competitive strategy director in New Jersey federal court, claiming he illegally downloaded thousands of confidential files on his way out the door to work for direct competitor Pfizer.

  • March 19, 2024

    3rd Circ. Says CFPB Can Go After Student Loan Trusts

    The Third Circuit ruled Tuesday that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau can carry on with its debt collection practices suit against a group of Delaware student loan trusts, rejecting their claims that they are just passive financing entities outside the reach of the agency's enforcement authority.

  • March 19, 2024

    Justices Say Courts Can Review Immigration Hardship Denial

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday revived a Trinidad and Tobago native's bid to cancel his removal based on the hardship it would cause his U.S. citizen son, ruling that circuit courts do have authority to review mixed questions of law and fact.

  • March 18, 2024

    Philly Nonprofit Execs Lived Large On Co. Money, Jury Told

    Jurors should not believe arguments from two nonprofit executives who are former associates of City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson who said they simply made bookkeeping mistakes and didn't concoct an alleged scheme to spend company money on things like huge bonuses, lavish vacations and bribing a Milwaukee school official, federal prosecutors said Monday. 

  • March 18, 2024

    SEC Fines Supervisor $47K Over Revenue Inflation Claims

    A former finance director of water treatment company Evoqua Water Technologies Corp. will pay the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission nearly $47,000 to resolve claims that he was part of a scheme to inflate the company's revenue by $36 million.

  • March 18, 2024

    4th Circ. Sends Opioid 'Nuisance' Question To W.Va. Top Court

    The Fourth Circuit asked West Virginia's high court Monday to determine whether the state's public nuisance law can be used to target companies that shipped drugs to pharmacies in a community ravaged by addiction, a crucial question in litigation spawned by the opioid crisis.

  • March 18, 2024

    Canada Dry Gets Va. Wage Claim Trimmed From OT Suit In Pa.

    A Pennsylvania federal judge agreed Monday to toss Virginia state wage claims from a Pennsylvania lawsuit accusing Canada Dry of miscalculating overtime wages for eligible workers, saying a 2022 amendment that set overtime pay limits dooms the state wage claims.

  • March 18, 2024

    Construction Co. Can't Dodge Fired Pa. Pot Patient's Bias Suit

    A Pennsylvania federal judge has kept alive the crux of a former painter's suit alleging an industrial construction company illegally fired her after she tested positive for pot despite holding a medical marijuana card, finding her collective bargaining agreement doesn't bounce the claim from court.

  • March 18, 2024

    Pa. Firm Partner's Equity Suit Sent Back To State Court

    A dispute between two firm partners is being remanded to Pennsylvania state court after a U.S. district judge ruled Friday that the case lacks the geographic diversity required to be in federal court because both attorneys remain members of the firm, despite one submitting notice of her intent to withdraw.

  • March 18, 2024

    Would-Be Pa. Candidate Can't Invalidate Signature Objections

    A candidate seeking to get on the Democratic ballot for Pennsylvania's U.S. Senate race got an extension for filing his nomination petitions, so voters challenging the validity of his petition signatures also got an extension, a state appellate court has ruled in a now-precedential decision. 

  • March 15, 2024

    DC Circ. Presses FERC On Justification For Pipeline Expansion

    A D.C. Circuit panel on Friday questioned whether the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission had demonstrated that a Northeast pipeline expansion project was necessary to ensure that the region would have enough natural gas during extremely cold weather.

  • March 15, 2024

    Jury Awards GeigTech $34.6M In Roller Shade Patent Trial

    A New York federal jury has found that home lighting fixtures company Lutron owes GeigTech $34.6 million for infringing its patent on window shade brackets, while also finding that the infringement was willful.

  • March 15, 2024

    Pittsburgh NLRB Office Approves Security Co.'s ULP Deal

    A security company will pay more than $286,000 to workers to settle an unfair labor practice charge, the National Labor Relations Board announced Friday, with the NLRB general counsel winning a lost bargaining opportunity remedy.

  • March 15, 2024

    Pa. Court Can Hear NY Borrowers' Class Action Against Bank

    The Pennsylvania Superior Court has ruled in a precedential opinion that a Philadelphia court can preside over class claims brought by borrowers from New York as well as Pennsylvania, claiming Five Star Bank violated both states' uniform commercial codes by repossessing their vehicles.

  • March 15, 2024

    Pa. University Knocks Out Surgeon's $15M Sex Bias Win

    A Pennsylvania federal judge has erased a $15 million verdict won by a surgeon who said Thomas Jefferson University ignored his claims that a female resident sexually assaulted him, ruling that text messages he sent warranted a new trial.

  • March 15, 2024

    Ex-Philly AFSCME Council Prez Wants Election Bar Reversed

    A former American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees leader who faced charges that he skirted hiring rules wants a Pennsylvania federal court to find that a hearing officer overstepped his authority when he removed him from office and banned him from running for reelection last month.

  • March 15, 2024

    White House Stands By 3rd Circ. Nominee Amid GOP Attacks

    White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre on Friday urged the Senate to confirm Third Circuit nominee Adeel Mangi, who would be the first Muslim federal appellate judge, amid widespread criticism from Republicans and a report that the votes might not be there to secure confirmation.

  • March 14, 2024

    Foul-Language Row Met With Fowl Metaphors In Court Showdown

    An attorney for Welch Foods hatched a flock of duck-related metaphors Thursday during an oral argument over whether a male ex-worker's vulgar comments to a female coworker amounted to sexual harassment, and if an arbitrator had been wrong to reinstate the ex-worker despite the facts before her.

  • March 14, 2024

    Verizon Sues Pa. Town Over Cell Tower Permit Denial

    Verizon Wirless is suing a small Pennsylvania borough for rejecting its application to install a 105-foot monopole and equipment compound near the town's center, saying the denial will inhibit Verizon from closing a wireless coverage gap and violates the Communications Act of 1934.

  • March 14, 2024

    Publisher Must Face Privacy Claims Over Meta Pixel Tool

    An Ohio federal judge has ruled that the publisher of The Toledo Blade and the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette can't duck a proposed privacy class action alleging that the newspapers shared the video-viewing history of their website users with Facebook's parent company, Meta Platforms Inc., without their permission.

  • March 14, 2024

    Most States Fall Short In Disclosing Justices' Finance Reports

    The vast majority of state supreme courts make it exceedingly difficult for the public to get information about justices' financial entanglements, and the information they do give out is often scant at best, according to a report released Thursday.

  • March 14, 2024

    Health Co. Says Future Harm Risk Falls Short In Breach Suit

    New Jersey healthcare provider Capital Health System urged a Garden State federal judge on Wednesday to toss a proposed class action seeking damages as a result of a 2023 data breach, arguing that the plaintiffs failed to allege their personal identifying information was actually misused.

  • March 14, 2024

    In 3rd Win, Sig Sauer Beats ICE Agent's Defective-Gun Suit

    Sig Sauer has defeated a third product liability lawsuit from a user who claimed its P320 pistol spontaneously discharged, injuring him without the trigger being touched, convincing another federal judge that the plaintiff's expert witness testimony should be disqualified.

Expert Analysis

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

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    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

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    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

  • And Now A Word From The Panel: Tracking MDL Geography

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    In recent years, the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation has predominantly selected states east of the Mississippi River as venues for new MDLs — but with half of the proceedings it has created in recent months venued in Arizona and California, the panel is not neglecting the western part of the country, says Alan Rothman at Sidley.

  • Pa. Ruling Shows Why Term Sheet Can Be Worth The Wait

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    A Pennsylvania bankruptcy court’s recent In re: Legarde ruling, holding that a settlement term sheet was enforceable, reminds litigants that it’s crucial to draft a written agreement before leaving mediation in order to resolve potential evidentiary issues and protect against buyer’s remorse, says Brian Shaw at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Understanding Discovery Obligations In Era Of Generative AI

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Attorneys and businesses must adapt to the unique discovery challenges presented by generative artificial intelligence, such as chatbot content and prompts, while upholding the principles of fairness, transparency and compliance with legal obligations in federal civil litigation, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • An Overview Of Circuit Courts' Interlocutory Motion Standards

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    The Federal Arbitration Act allows litigants to file an immediate appeal from an order declining to enforce an arbitration agreement, but the circuit courts differ on the specific requirements for the underlying order as well as which motion must be filed, as demonstrated in several 2023 decisions, says Kristen Mueller at Mueller Law.

  • The Case For Post-Bar Clerk Training Programs At Law Firms

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    In today's competitive legal hiring market, an intentionally designed training program for law school graduates awaiting bar admission can be an effective way of creating a pipeline of qualified candidates, says Brent Daub at Gilson Daub.

  • Attorneys Have An Ethical Duty To Protect The Judiciary

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    The tenor of public disagreement and debate has become increasingly hostile against judges, and though the legislative branch is trying to ameliorate this safety gap, lawyers have a moral imperative and professional requirement to stand with judges in defusing attacks against them and their rulings, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • What Cos. Should Know About FTC's Proposed Junk Fee Rule

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    The Federal Trade Commission recently announced a notice of proposed rulemaking targeting junk fees and how businesses may advertise prices to consumers — and since it would give the agency powers to seek monetary penalties against businesses that do not comply, companies should look to get ahead now, say Phyllis Marcus and Nicole Johnson at Hunton Andrews.

  • AI Can Help Lawyers Overcome The Programming Barrier

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    Legal professionals without programming expertise can use generative artificial intelligence to harness the power of automation and other technology solutions to streamline their work, without the steep learning curve traditionally associated with coding, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Preparing Law Students For A New, AI-Assisted Legal World

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    As artificial intelligence rapidly transforms the legal landscape, law schools must integrate technology and curricula that address AI’s innate challenges — from ethics to data security — to help students stay ahead of the curve, say Daniel Garrie at Law & Forensics, Ryan Abbott at JAMS and Karen Silverman at Cantellus Group.

  • General Counsel Need Data Literacy To Keep Up With AI

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    With the rise of accessible and powerful generative artificial intelligence solutions, it is imperative for general counsel to understand the use and application of data for myriad important activities, from evaluating the e-discovery process to monitoring compliance analytics and more, says Colin Levy at Malbek.

  • Rite Aid's Reasons For Ch. 11 Go Beyond Opioid Suits

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    Despite opioid-related lawsuits being the perceived reason that pushed Rite Aid into bankruptcy, the company's recent Chapter 11 filing reveals its tenuous position in the pharmaceutical retail market, and only time will tell whether bankruptcy will right-size the company, says Daniel Gielchinsky at DGIM Law.

  • Navigating Discovery Of Generative AI Information

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools become increasingly ubiquitous, companies must make sure to preserve generative AI data when there is reasonable expectation of litigation, and to include transcripts in litigation hold notices, as they may be relevant to discovery requests, say Nick Peterson and Corey Hauser at Wiley.

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

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    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

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