Project Finance

  • March 04, 2024

    Puerto Rico Fiscal Board Argues For Utility Reorg Plan

    Puerto Rico's fiscal oversight board told a federal judge on Monday that it had the only plan to save the island's troubled electric utility, while bondholders claimed the board had created the plan specifically to shortchange them.

  • March 04, 2024

    What To Know About 9th Circ. Ruling On Tribe's Sacred Site

    A split Ninth Circuit ruling that a sacred tribal site in Arizona's Tonto National Forest can be transferred to a copper mining company is certain to be appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court by the San Carlos Apache Tribe, which contends that the decision effectively bulldozes a long-held worship site and ultimately denies the tribe's freedom of religious expression, despite the panel's skepticism of that claim.

  • March 04, 2024

    FERC Slams Brakes On $1.1B Bridgepoint-ECP Deal

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has blocked U.K. asset manager Bridgepoint Group PLC's proposed £835 million ($1.1 billion) purchase of Energy Capital Partners LP, saying the companies haven't shown the merger wouldn't affect competition in U.S. electricity markets.

  • March 04, 2024

    Ohio Agency Puts Discovery On Hold In FirstEnergy Probes

    The Ohio utilities commission will hold off discovery for its just-unfrozen investigations arising from FirstEnergy Corp.'s notorious bribery scandal after the state attorney general's office warned that compelling testimony from anyone allegedly involved in the scheme could make them immune from criminal prosecution.

  • March 01, 2024

    McDermott Investors' Cert. Bid Should Be Denied, Judge Says

    Investors in energy industry engineering company McDermott International Inc. shouldn't be granted class certification in their suit over the company's $6 billion all-stock acquisition of Chicago Bridge & Iron Co., a federal magistrate judge has determined.

  • March 01, 2024

    Top Groups Lobbying The FCC

    The Federal Communications Commission heard from companies and interest groups close to 200 times in February on subjects ranging from net neutrality rules to "all-in" cable pricing, device security labels, minimum broadband speeds and more.

  • March 01, 2024

    Off The Bench: NCAA Loses On NIL, DC Wins With Stadium

    In this week's Off The Bench, a judge unlocked the door to name, image and likeness money for college athletes, Shaquille O'Neal's Hollywood debut still rings true three decades later, and D.C. clears an early legislative hurdle in its bid to bring back its namesake NFL team. If you were on the sidelines over the past week, Law360 is here to clue you in on the biggest sports and betting stories that had our readers talking.

  • March 01, 2024

    Ky. Sees $74M Boost For Abandoned Mine Cleanup Work

    The U.S. Department of the Interior said it is awarding Kentucky another $74 million in funding to help the state address dangerous and polluting abandoned mines.

  • February 29, 2024

    Worley Pays Ecuador $6M To Resolve Oil Refinery Dispute

    The Ecuador attorney general's office has reported that Worley International Services Inc. fully paid a $6 million award to reimburse the country for fees and costs it incurred in an international arbitration over bribes the engineering firm made to secure oil refinery contracts.

  • February 29, 2024

    EPA Puts Off Key Component Of Power Plant GHG Rule

    When highly anticipated regulations intended to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from power plants are finalized this spring, existing gas-fired facilities won't be addressed because separate, broader regulations are being crafted just for them, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Thursday.

  • February 29, 2024

    Lima Denies Contractor's Call For Sanctions In $140M Row

    Lima has asked a D.C. federal judge to deny a highway contractor's bid for attorney fees as it looks to enforce nearly $140 million in arbitral awards against the Peruvian city, saying the contractor wrongly claims that the city's attempts to vacate the awards are sanctionable.

  • February 29, 2024

    Millions May Lose Internet Access Without Subsidy, FCC Says

    Millions of users will struggle to pay for internet access without the Affordable Connectivity Program's subsidy, the Federal Communications Commission said Thursday, pushing back against Republican claims that ACP customers will be fine if the program's funding lapses.

  • February 29, 2024

    Biden Floats 3 Nominees To Return FERC To Full Strength

    President Joe Biden on Thursday unveiled a trio of nominees to fill vacant commissioner slots at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, including the solicitor general of West Virginia and a former Massachusetts energy official.

  • February 29, 2024

    NY Tabs Equinor, Orsted Projects For Offshore Wind Deals

    New York officials on Thursday awarded power contracts to offshore wind projects being developed by Equinor and an Orsted-Eversource partnership, the first contracts awarded under a revised bidding process aimed at combating macroeconomic headwinds buffeting U.S. offshore wind development.

  • February 29, 2024

    GE Denies Ties To La. Environmental Contamination Suit

    General Electric has told a Louisiana federal judge it should be freed from a lawsuit seeking to hold it liable for widespread environmental contamination caused by a since-closed pressure valve manufacturing facility in Rapides Parish, saying the property owners behind the suit are relying on a misguided theory of liability.

  • February 28, 2024

    Skeptical DC Circ. Probes Treaty's Arbitration Applicability

    A D.C. Circuit panel on Wednesday seemed dubious about efforts by Spain and Romania to escape the enforcement of substantial arbitration awards based on the contention that European Union law prohibits arbitration between member states and European investors.

  • February 28, 2024

    Judge Asks When Feds Will Consider Climate In Oil Leases

    A D.C. federal judge on Wednesday voiced frustration at the Bureau of Land Management's inability to account for the total impact of carbon emissions from six western oil and gas leases, but cautioned that previous circuit courts have upheld federal agencies' reluctance to block projects based on climate change predictions.

  • February 28, 2024

    Fla. Judge OKs $43.5M Deutsche Bank Deal In Ch. 15 Case

    A Florida bankruptcy judge on Wednesday approved a $43.5 million settlement between Deutsche Bank AG and liquidators for a group of Caribbean-based companies to resolve claims against the bank for its alleged role in a real estate Ponzi scheme targeting rich South Americans.

  • February 28, 2024

    Energy Dept. To Give Tribes $25M For Clean Energy Tech

    The U.S. Department of Energy has said it is paying out $25 million in funds to Indigenous tribes for clean energy technology on tribal lands as part of an approximately $366 million Biden administration plan to support community-driven energy projects in rural areas.

  • February 28, 2024

    FCC 'Amnesty' Sought For Rural Broadband Grant Defaults

    Broadband experts got together Wednesday to urge the Federal Communications Commission to offer "amnesty" for defaulting on FCC-funded rural network development projects, so that unserved areas can still receive similar grants being distributed by the U.S. Department of Commerce.

  • February 28, 2024

    Win For DC's NFL Stadium Bid As House Approves Bill

    A bill that would clear a path for the Washington, D.C., city government to build a new stadium for the NFL's Commanders on the site of the team's former stadium was passed by the full House on Wednesday and sent to the Senate, possibly paving the way for the team to return to the city.

  • February 28, 2024

    NC Biz Court Pares Feud Over Costly City Streetcar Expansion

    The North Carolina Business Court has narrowed a general contractor's $115 million lawsuit against the city of Charlotte stemming from a streetcar line construction project, saying the city isn't immune but that a swath of claims were otherwise filed too late.

  • February 28, 2024

    Energy Cos. Urge Justices To Slam Brakes On Climate Suits

    Fossil fuel companies on Wednesday launched a fresh U.S. Supreme Court bid to put an end to climate change torts lodged by state and local governments, asking the justices to review and overturn a refusal by Hawaii's top court to dismiss Honolulu's suit.

  • February 27, 2024

    SunZia Line Injunction Needed To Save Sites, Ariz. Tribes Say

    Two Native American tribes and conservation groups seeking to halt construction of a 550-mile power line have renewed their push for a preliminary injunction, arguing that without the order, important cultural and historical sites in the San Pedro Valley will be reduced to collateral damage.

  • February 27, 2024

    Commanders Unveil Stadium Upgrades Amid Possible Move

    The Washington Commanders on Tuesday announced a total of $75 million in upgrades to its current home stadium that includes new premium seating and a new sound system, amid a battle to determine where the NFL team will play in the future.

Expert Analysis

  • Business Takeaways From Biden's Global Labor Rights Memo

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    President Joe Biden's recent memorandum on protecting worker rights is one of the most expansive statements the administration has made regarding international labor rights policy, and reflects several points of which businesses should take note, including the government’s interest in working with the private sector on these issues and a notable focus on the transition to clean energy, say Tom Plotkin and Pegah Nabili at Covington.

  • New Regs Will Strengthen Voluntary Carbon Offset Market

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    Voluntary carbon offsets are a vital tool for organizations seeking to achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions — and recent efforts by the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the state of California and others are essential to enhancing the reliability and authenticity of carbon credits, says David Smith at Manatt.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

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    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

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    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

  • Understanding Discovery Obligations In Era Of Generative AI

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Attorneys and businesses must adapt to the unique discovery challenges presented by generative artificial intelligence, such as chatbot content and prompts, while upholding the principles of fairness, transparency and compliance with legal obligations in federal civil litigation, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Navigating USCIS' New Minimum EB-5 Investment Period

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    Recent significant modifications to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ EB-5 at-risk requirement are causing uncertainty for several reasons, but investors who consider certain key aspects of prospective projects can mitigate the immigration and investment risks, say Samuel Silverman at EB5AN, Ronald Klasko at Klasko Immigration, and Kate Kalmykov at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Calif. Resource Adequacy Update May Revalue Power Projects

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    The California Public Utilities Commission's recently initiated proceeding to overhaul its resource adequacy framework — part of an effort to maintain the reliability of the state's power system while decarbonizing it — could have significant effects on the valuation of existing and future power generation resources, say Nicholas Gladd and Max Learner at Wilson Sonsini.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Mexico

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    ESG has yet to become part of the DNA of the Mexican business model, but huge strides are being made in that direction, as more stakeholders demand that companies adopt, at the least, a modicum of sustainability commitments and demonstrate how they will meet them, says Carlos Escoto at Galicia Abogados.

  • The Case For Post-Bar Clerk Training Programs At Law Firms

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    In today's competitive legal hiring market, an intentionally designed training program for law school graduates awaiting bar admission can be an effective way of creating a pipeline of qualified candidates, says Brent Daub at Gilson Daub.

  • Attorneys Have An Ethical Duty To Protect The Judiciary

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    The tenor of public disagreement and debate has become increasingly hostile against judges, and though the legislative branch is trying to ameliorate this safety gap, lawyers have a moral imperative and professional requirement to stand with judges in defusing attacks against them and their rulings, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • What NJ's Green Remediation Guidance Means For Cleanups

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    Recent guidance from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection promoting greener approaches to restoring contaminated sites demonstrates the state's commitment to sustainability and environmental justice — but could also entail more complexity, higher costs and longer remediation timelines, say J. Michael Showalter and Bradley Rochlen at ArentFox Schiff.

  • Mo. Solar Projects Need Clarity On Enterprise Zone Tax Relief

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    In Missouri, enhanced enterprise zones offer tax abatements that could offset the cost of solar project infrastructure, but developers must be willing to navigate uncertainty about whether the project is classified as real property, say Lizzy McEntire and Anna Kimbrell at Husch Blackwell.

  • AI Can Help Lawyers Overcome The Programming Barrier

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    Legal professionals without programming expertise can use generative artificial intelligence to harness the power of automation and other technology solutions to streamline their work, without the steep learning curve traditionally associated with coding, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • What To Expect After Colo. Nixes Special Standing Rules

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    Two recent Colorado Supreme Court decisions have abandoned a test to preclude standing in lawsuits challenging government decisions brought by subordinate government entities, which will likely lead to an admixture of results, including opening the door to additional legal challenges between government entities, says John Crisham at Crisham & Holman.

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