Telecommunications

  • March 18, 2024

    Senate Dems Press Congress On Broadband Subsidy Renewal

    Nearly three dozen Senate Democrats urged the leadership of both chambers to restore funding for the Federal Communications Commission's broadband program as time runs short to continue paying consumer discounts for internet service.

  • March 18, 2024

    FCC Fines Ga. Radio Broadcaster Over Station Silences

    The former owner of a Georgia sports radio station has been slapped with a $16,200 fine by the FCC for repeatedly suspending operations, allowing the station to change hands without permission and not answering the agency's inquiries about any of it.

  • March 18, 2024

    Provider To Pay $100K Fine For 'Downselling' Broadband

    A fiber broadband provider in Texas and Louisiana has agreed to pay a $100,000 fine to the Federal Communications Commission for selling only its slowest service plan to customers in the Affordable Connectivity Program.

  • March 18, 2024

    The Biggest Trade Secrets Awards In The Last 5 Years

    Trade secrets cases are having a moment in the spotlight, thanks to some gargantuan damages awards over the past five years and more flexibility for plaintiffs to argue for what they think they are owed.

  • March 18, 2024

    Texas Judges Pause Wireless Patent Fights For PTAB

    The top two federal judges in Texas handling patent cases have agreed to hold litigation between two automotive brands and a prolific litigation outfit after BMW persuaded the patent board to review "every single claim" involved in litigation over decade-old wireless patents.

  • March 18, 2024

    Del. Suit Details Wrongful Takeover Of Telecom System Co.

    The founder and former CEO of a Florida-headquartered telecommunications infrastructure building company has sued the head of an investment firm and others Monday in Delaware's Court of Chancery, accusing them of carrying out a "fraudulent scheme" to wrest control of the business.

  • March 18, 2024

    Sen. Vance Backs Suit To Declare Google Common Carrier

    Sen. J.D. Vance, R-Ohio, and an anti-monopoly nonprofit have backed the Ohio state attorney general's lawsuit seeking to declare Google as a common carrier.

  • March 18, 2024

    High Court Doubts Feds Coerced Social Media Cos.

    A majority of the U.S. Supreme Court appeared unconvinced Monday that the Biden administration violated the First Amendment by working with social media platforms to combat the spread of misinformation, often chiding Louisiana's solicitor general for presenting confusing and overly expansive arguments.

  • March 18, 2024

    Colo. Wildfire Plaintiffs Say Xcel Trial Plan Would Sow 'Chaos'

    Nearly 4,000 Colorado property owners suing Xcel Energy over a 2021 wildfire have argued that the utility's proposal to try all of their liability claims together would create a "chaotic and expensive mess" and potentially result in "serial juries" awarding different damages later on.

  • March 18, 2024

    FCC Raises Broadband Speeds, But Many ISPs Already There

    Many households across the country can already get the Federal Communications Commission's new benchmark for broadband internet, but making sure that level of service reaches rural and tribal areas remains a tough challenge.

  • March 18, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Multimillion-dollar e-cigarette settlements, $4 billion in stock buybacks and a $6.1 million appraisal tweak were among the big-dollar items logged in the Delaware Court of Chancery's ledger last week. Also on the docket: a Panama port project, a news outlet's defamation case, drone disputes and a flood of mail from Tesla shareholders. In case you missed it, here's all the latest from the Chancery Court.

  • March 16, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Gov't Jawboning & Retaliatory Arrests

    The U.S. Supreme Court has a packed oral arguments calendar this week that includes disputes over the Biden administration's work with social media companies to combat misinformation, the appropriate evidence standard for bringing retaliatory arrest claims and whether the federal government can object to a consent decree entered into by three states.

  • March 15, 2024

    Google Wants Facebook Pact Kept Out Of Ad Tech Discovery

    Google urged a Texas federal judge on Friday to reject state-level enforcers' bid to lift a stay on discovery for documents related to a bidding agreement between Google and Facebook in the suit accusing the search giant of monopolizing key digital ad technology, saying the plaintiffs' antitrust claims based on the agreement have already been dismissed.

  • March 15, 2024

    Meta Can't Block FTC Plans To Stop Kids' Data Monetization

    Meta filed its second appeal Friday after suffering another D.C. federal court loss against proposed Federal Trade Commission tweaks to a $5 billion data privacy settlement meant to block its monetization of children's data.

  • March 15, 2024

    Roblox's Casino Games Are 'Preying On Children,' Suit Says

    Online game platform Roblox Corp. has been hit with another proposed class action suit in California federal court accusing it and other companies of "preying on children nationwide" through an "illegal gambling ecosystem" that specifically targets minors.

  • March 15, 2024

    Feds Streamline Historic Reviews For Broadband Projects

    The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation is heeding the call to make it easier for historical preservation checks to be done on any broadband projects that use federal funds, announcing that it will amend the rules to add that flexibility.

  • March 15, 2024

    AT&T Outage Calls For FirstNet Review, Group Tells Lawmakers

    An emergency telecommunications industry group is calling for a full congressional investigation of the AT&T-run FirstNet emergency response network, saying the company's massive network outage last month demonstrates the need for competition and redundancy in first responder networks.

  • March 15, 2024

    Apple Wants 'Convoluted' IPhone App Antitrust Suit Tossed

    Apple Inc. asked a California federal judge Thursday to toss a proposed antitrust class action alleging that Apple Inc. illegally controls which apps are viewed on iPhone web browsers to boost iPhone prices, arguing that the consumers don't have standing to bring their "highly convoluted and speculative" claims.

  • March 15, 2024

    Firm Can't Drop Snoop Dogg Robocall Suit Like It's Hot

    A cost-cutting firm will have to face claims that it used a Snoop Dogg soundalike to make illegal robocalls in an attempt to get people to enlist their help signing up for a tax credit, promising the company could "have them funds in your hands quicker than you can roll up your favorite ... well, you know what I mean."

  • March 15, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    The past week in London has seen Howard Kennedy face legal action by a London hotel chain, former racing boss Bernie Ecclestone and Formula One hit with a breach of contract claim by a Brazilian racecar driver, and a libel row between broadcaster Jeremy Vine and ex-footballer Joey Barton. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • March 15, 2024

    Onix Networking Buyer Sues Seller In Del. Alleging Deal Fraud

    A private equity firm that bought Onix Networking Corp. in 2022 has sued the company's former owners in Delaware's Court of Chancery to rescind part of the deal, alleging seller fraud and misrepresentation of annual revenues by "tens of millions of dollars."

  • March 15, 2024

    Justices Craft Test To Decide If Social Media Use Is Official

    The U.S. Supreme Court adopted a new test Friday to determine if a public official's social media use constitutes state action subject to liability under the First Amendment, instructing courts to consider whether the official had authority to speak on the government's behalf and whether they purported to do so in the challenged action.

  • March 14, 2024

    IP Forecast: Internet Archive Fights Vinyl Copyright Case

    A California federal judge will hear arguments next week over whether the Internet Archive can toss accusations from record labels that describe its project for a free, digitized library of 78 rpm records as a "wholesale theft of generations of music." Here's a look at that case, plus all the other major intellectual property matters on deck in the coming week.

  • March 14, 2024

    FCC Proposes Adding Emergency Alerts For Missing Adults

    The Federal Communications Commission on Thursday proposed to require that broadcast and cellphone carriers send out mobile notifications about missing adults, similar to Amber Alerts about missing children, to fix a shortcoming in the nation's public safety alert system.

  • March 14, 2024

    Verizon Sues Pa. Town Over Cell Tower Permit Denial

    Verizon Wirless is suing a small Pennsylvania borough for rejecting its application to install a 105-foot monopole and equipment compound near the town's center, saying the denial will inhibit Verizon from closing a wireless coverage gap and violates the Communications Act of 1934.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

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    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

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    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

  • Understanding Discovery Obligations In Era Of Generative AI

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Attorneys and businesses must adapt to the unique discovery challenges presented by generative artificial intelligence, such as chatbot content and prompts, while upholding the principles of fairness, transparency and compliance with legal obligations in federal civil litigation, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Chancery's 'Unfair Deal, Fair Price' Ruling Part Of A Trend

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    The Delaware Court of Chancery's recent decision in In re: Straight Path Communications is the latest in a line of recent post-trial rulings by the court that seem to prioritize a fair price in determining damage awards — even when a transaction has been clouded by an unfair process, say attorneys at V&E.

  • Kochava Ruling May Hint At Next Privacy Class Action Wave

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    The Southern District of California's recent ruling in Greenley v. Kochava and increasing complaints alleging that a consumer website is an illegal “pen register” due to the use of third-party marketing software tools foreshadow a new theory of liability for plaintiffs in privacy litigation, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Mexico

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    ESG has yet to become part of the DNA of the Mexican business model, but huge strides are being made in that direction, as more stakeholders demand that companies adopt, at the least, a modicum of sustainability commitments and demonstrate how they will meet them, says Carlos Escoto at Galicia Abogados.

  • The Case For Post-Bar Clerk Training Programs At Law Firms

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    In today's competitive legal hiring market, an intentionally designed training program for law school graduates awaiting bar admission can be an effective way of creating a pipeline of qualified candidates, says Brent Daub at Gilson Daub.

  • Opinion

    A Telecom Attorney's Defense Of The Chevron Doctrine

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    The Chevron doctrine, which requires judicial deference to federal regulators, is under attack in two U.S. Supreme Court cases — and while most telecom attorneys likely agree that the Federal Communications Commission is guilty of overrelying on it, the problem is not the doctrine itself, says Carl Northrop at Telecommunications Law Professionals.

  • Attorneys Have An Ethical Duty To Protect The Judiciary

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    The tenor of public disagreement and debate has become increasingly hostile against judges, and though the legislative branch is trying to ameliorate this safety gap, lawyers have a moral imperative and professional requirement to stand with judges in defusing attacks against them and their rulings, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • What Cos. Should Know About FTC's Proposed Junk Fee Rule

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    The Federal Trade Commission recently announced a notice of proposed rulemaking targeting junk fees and how businesses may advertise prices to consumers — and since it would give the agency powers to seek monetary penalties against businesses that do not comply, companies should look to get ahead now, say Phyllis Marcus and Nicole Johnson at Hunton Andrews.

  • 9th Circ. ERISA Ruling Informs DOL's New Fiduciary Proposal

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    The Ninth Circuit's reasoning in its recent Bugielski v. AT&T decision illustrates the importance of the U.S. Department of Labor's proposals to expand the reach of Employee Retirement Income Security Act third-party compensation disclosure rules and their effect on investment adviser fiduciaries, says Jeff Mamorsky at Cohen & Buckmann.

  • AI Can Help Lawyers Overcome The Programming Barrier

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    Legal professionals without programming expertise can use generative artificial intelligence to harness the power of automation and other technology solutions to streamline their work, without the steep learning curve traditionally associated with coding, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Why The Effect Of Vivint Has Been Minimal

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    A survey of recent ex parte reexamination decisions since the Federal Circuit’s 2021 In re: Vivint decision appears to support the court’s conclusion that the ruling was limited in scope and would have limited impact, says Yao Wang at Fish & Richardson.

  • Preparing Law Students For A New, AI-Assisted Legal World

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    As artificial intelligence rapidly transforms the legal landscape, law schools must integrate technology and curricula that address AI’s innate challenges — from ethics to data security — to help students stay ahead of the curve, say Daniel Garrie at Law & Forensics, Ryan Abbott at JAMS and Karen Silverman at Cantellus Group.

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