Trials

  • May 01, 2024

    Colo. Toll Lane Venture Says Aecom Can't Get Penalty Interest

    A Colorado joint venture that formed to construct a state toll lanes project has told a federal judge that he erroneously awarded a design firm penalty interest on a $5.2 million judgment, arguing in a motion that the firm doesn't qualify as a subcontractor under Colorado law.

  • May 01, 2024

    Metal Biz Owner Cops To Tax Fraud On $2.8M Income

    The owner of a metal fabrication company admitted to neglecting to report nearly $3 million in business income to the IRS, Connecticut federal prosecutors announced.

  • May 01, 2024

    NBA Vet Eyes Bail As Healthcare Rap Passed To 2nd Circ.

    A former Detroit Pistons point guard is seeking to delay the start of his 18-month prison sentence for his alleged role in a scheme to defraud the NBA's healthcare plan while he argues to the Second Circuit that improper jury instructions tainted his trial.

  • May 01, 2024

    In Trump Staredown With NY Judge, 'Somebody Has To Blink'

    Experts say Donald Trump will likely continue to ignore warnings from the court, and possibly his own attorneys, as his Manhattan hush money trial resumes Thursday with a fresh set of arguments over the presumptive Republican presidential nominee's out-of-court statements.

  • May 01, 2024

    Overtime Theft Scheme Earns Ex-Mass. Trooper 3 Years

    The former second-in-command of a Massachusetts state police traffic safety unit was sentenced to three years in prison for his role in a widespread conspiracy to steal federally funded overtime through no-work shifts.

  • April 30, 2024

    Ex-Autonomy VP Says CEO Lynch Told Him To Lie To Investors

    A former Autonomy business development executive testified Tuesday that CEO Mike Lynch directed him to lie to a hedge fund investor about prepaid royalty deals that boosted the company's upfront revenue numbers, saying at Lynch's criminal fraud trial that it was hard to say no to the "big boss."

  • April 30, 2024

    Chiquita Capitalized On Colombian War, Victims' Families Say

    Attorneys representing the families of 10 men killed during Colombia's civil war told a Florida federal jury Tuesday that the Chiquita banana company is liable for their deaths, saying it knowingly funded a right-wing narcoterrorist group that committed atrocities against its workers as the fruit corporation expanded its business.

  • April 30, 2024

    Justices Told Error Admission Merits Respect In Capital Case

    Attorneys general from across the country implored the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday to give the "utmost" deference to Oklahoma's confession that prosecutorial misconduct led to the wrongful conviction of a death row inmate and to overturn a state court ruling that rebuffed the admission and upheld the conviction.

  • April 30, 2024

    Atty Tells Trump Jury That Hush Money Deal Almost Tanked

    An attorney who previously represented adult film star Stormy Daniels told jurors Tuesday in the New York criminal trial of Donald Trump about how the $130,000 hush money agreement at the heart of the case was nearly derailed after former Trump lawyer Michael Cohen would not close the deal.

  • April 30, 2024

    Detroit Tigers Say Fired Workers Can't Testify At Age Bias Trial

    The Detroit Tigers has told a federal court that a former employee who alleged the club made a habit of letting older workers go to promote younger ones shouldn't be allowed to have eight other departed or demoted staff members testify in an upcoming trial.

  • April 30, 2024

    Truck Driver Wins $12M In Illinois Crash Case

    An Illinois state jury hit a pipeline construction company with a $12 million verdict over claims that one of its drivers rear-ended a semitruck driver, causing a spinal injury and lifelong pain.

  • April 30, 2024

    Where VLSI-Intel's High-Stakes Patent Battle Stands Now

    Intel has managed to turn the tide on litigation where it had faced the daunting possibility of owing VLSI Technology more than $3 billion for infringing microchip patents, with the tech company winning patent invalidations and a large verdict do-over. Here's a look at where the multifaceted litigation between the companies stands.

  • April 30, 2024

    Samsung Gets PTAB To Sink Patent Tied To $142M Verdict

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board has ruled in favor of Samsung Electronics Co. LTD in the company's challenge to LTE technology owned by G+ Communications LLC, invalidating one of the patents involved in a Texas case where G+ won a $142 million verdict against the tech giant.

  • April 30, 2024

    Dust Spray Maker Hit With $7.75M Verdict Over Fatal DUI

    The maker of aerosol dust remover has been ordered by a Minnesota federal jury to pay $7.75 million to the husband of a woman who was killed in a car accident by a truck driver who huffed the spray before getting behind the wheel.

  • April 30, 2024

    Camp Lejeune Litigants Balk At Bellwether Pick Process

    The leadership group for former residents of Camp Lejeune who claim that contaminated drinking water caused their diseases has told the North Carolina federal court overseeing their case that it's too soon to limit trials to just plaintiffs who allege only one disease.

  • April 30, 2024

    1st Circ. Says Flyers' JetBlue-Spirit Deal Challenge Moot

    The First Circuit has tossed an appeal brought by airline customers who had challenged a since-abandoned merger between JetBlue Airways Corp. and Spirit Airlines in light of the government's successful antitrust intervention.

  • April 30, 2024

    Truth Social Investor Had No Criminal Intent, NY Jury Told

    Counsel for a Florida investment pro accused of insider trading on advance knowledge of a deal to take public former President Donald Trump's media concern Truth Social argued to a Manhattan federal jury Tuesday that he acted in good faith.

  • April 30, 2024

    Apple Says Astroworld Trial Is Halted For Pretrial Loss Appeal

    Apple told a state court Monday that the first trial in litigation stemming from the 2021 Astroworld crowd crush is automatically stayed while it appeals a Houston judge's denial of its bid for a pretrial win in a move that the victims called a "bad-faith, desperate attempt" to "derail" the proceedings less than a week before jury selection is set to begin.

  • April 30, 2024

    8th Circ. Orders BASF Damages Trial In Herbicide Row

    An Eighth Circuit panel on Tuesday once again directed a Missouri federal court to hold a trial to assess punitive damages for BASF Corp. in litigation alleging the sale of herbicide-resistant seeds led to the destruction of a farm's peach trees when herbicide drifted from neighboring farms.

  • April 30, 2024

    Trial Set For Lin Wood's Ex-Partners' Defamation Suit

    Controversial attorney Lin Wood will face trial in August in a defamation case brought by his former law partners who say he falsely accused them of trying to extort him, a Georgia federal judge decided Tuesday.

  • April 30, 2024

    Attys, Broker Can't Escape $4M Tax Fraud Convictions

    A North Carolina federal judge has denied acquittal requests from two tax attorneys and an insurance agent who were convicted for their roles in a $4 million tax avoidance scheme, saying he agreed with federal prosecutors who argued there was sufficient evidence for the underlying charges.

  • April 30, 2024

    King & Spalding Adds Miami Atty To Gov't Investigations Team

    A former federal prosecutor who was most recently a partner at Miami boutique Meland Budwick PA has joined King & Spalding LLP's special matters and government investigations practice, the firm announced Tuesday.

  • April 30, 2024

    Jury Convicts Ill. Biz Owner Of $1.3M VA Kickback Scheme

    An Illinois business owner was convicted on Monday of eight counts of wire fraud for paying kickbacks to a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs clerk in exchange for what prosecutors called "bogus" monthly rental fees.

  • April 30, 2024

    Trump Held In Contempt For Trashing Witnesses In NY Trial

    A New York state judge on Tuesday found former President Donald Trump in contempt of court for repeatedly violating a gag order in his criminal hush money case by publicly attacking expected witnesses, including his former attorney Michael Cohen.

  • April 30, 2024

    Coverage Recap: Day 5 Of Trump's NY Hush Money Trial

    Law360 reporters are providing live updates from the Manhattan criminal courthouse as Donald Trump goes on trial for allegedly falsifying business records related to hush money payments ahead of the 2016 election. Here's a recap from day five.

Expert Analysis

  • Lessons From This Year's Landmark Green Energy IP Clash

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    In this year's Siemens v. General Electric wind turbine patent dispute, a Massachusetts federal court offers a cautionary tale against willful infringement, and highlights the balance between innovation, law and ethics, as legal battles like this become more frequent in the renewable energy sector, say John Powell and Andrew Siuta at Sunstein.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • Tips For Defeating Claims Of Willful FLSA Violations

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    As employers increasingly encounter wage and hour complaints under the Fair Labor Standards Act, more companies could face enhanced penalties for violations deemed willful, but defense counsel can use several discovery and trial strategies to instead demonstrate the employer’s commitment to compliance, say Michael Mueller and Evangeline Paschal at Hunton.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • Trump NY Fraud Trial Shows Civil, Criminal Case Differences

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    Former President Donald Trump’s civil fraud trial currently unfolding in New York provides a reminder that civil bench trials can be just as damaging, if not more so, than criminal prosecutions, due to several key elements of civil litigation procedure, says retired attorney David Moskowitz.

  • How New Expert Rules Are Already Changing Court Decisions

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    Though not formally effective until last week, some courts have been relying for several years on amended federal rules clarifying judges’ gatekeeping role, so counsel should be prepared to justify their expert witnesses’ methodologies and expect additional motion practice on expert testimony admissibility, say Colleen Kenney and Daniel Kelly at Sidley.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

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    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

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    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

  • How Color Psychology Can Help Tell Your Trial Narrative

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    Research shows that color is a powerful sensory input that affects memory and perception, so attorneys should understand how, when and why to use certain shades in trial graphics to enhance their narrative and draw jurors’ focus, says Adam Bloomberg at IMS Consulting.

  • Understanding Discovery Obligations In Era Of Generative AI

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Attorneys and businesses must adapt to the unique discovery challenges presented by generative artificial intelligence, such as chatbot content and prompts, while upholding the principles of fairness, transparency and compliance with legal obligations in federal civil litigation, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Asserting 'Presence-Of-Counsel' Defense In Securities Trials

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    As illustrated by the fraud trial of FTX founder Sam Bankman-Fried, defense attorneys in securities trials might consider arguing that counsel had some involvement in the conduct at issue — if the more formal advice-of-counsel defense is unavailable and circumstances allow for a privilege waiver, say Joseph Dever and Matthew Elkin at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Why Criminal No-Poach Cases Can Be Deceptively Complex

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    Mark Rosman at Wilson Sonsini discusses the reasons many criminal no-poach cases that appear simple are actually more complicated than they seem, following several jury trial acquittals and two dismissed cases.

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